Restore image to SSD never moves from Progress 0%


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IanW
IanW
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Hello,

I have a Windows 7/64 and the latest purchased version of MR. I have backed up all my HDs to one mrimg file and now on my 8th incremental to USB3 external drive. My C drive (253Gb) is now giving R/W problems (ran CHKDSK and it is now running OK but lost at least one large file, don't know if I have lost any more files) so I have installed a new 480Gb SSD and am trying to restore the C drive from the 8th incremental to the SSD (in the expectation that I can then get the PC to use this as the C drive from then on.)

The SSD is assigned drive R, simple volume, not formatted (I have previously tried this with a formatted SSD but I had the same problem)

In MR I have selected Restore Image, selected the 8th incremental, dragged the C drive to the SSD (fills about half of it, I assume I can extend this partition later on)

MR displays all the right messages and says it is processing the mrimg file but both progress bars stay at 0%. I have left it running overnight and it still did nothing. Retried today but same problem. Screen grab attached

I am using Win7/64 (not the rescue disk) to run this restore

Please can anyone help me (I am no MR expert)

TIA

Addendum: Put in new 4Gb HD and the restore is running OK. When I formatted the SSD it behaved as a normal disk drive so the OS and hardware seem to accept the SS with no problem. It seems to be a problem with MR restoring to the SSD. 


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Edited 10 May 2016 12:11 PM by IanW
Richard V.
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If the old drive was still in place during your previous attempts, any R/W problems being detected on that drive could adversely affect system behaviour in general as it repeatedly attempts and fails to mount and read the drive's partitions properly.

Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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Edited 10 May 2016 2:21 PM by Arvy
Nick
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Hi Ian

Thanks for posting. Sorry you are having problems. 

The restore process uses the Windows WriteFile API and has no different processing for SSD's, with the exception of Trim.  To eliminate another process interfering with I/O, such as AV software, please try the same restore using the rescue media.  As Arvy suggests, removing the original boot disk, replacing it with your SDD, and restoring it directly may provide a faster restore experience.  In either case, if you cancel the restore process there will be I/O performance figures quoted at the end of the restore window. These will indicate the bottleneck. The Read performance is the read speed of the image source drive and the Write performance is the write speed of the restore target drive. 

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

Edited 10 May 2016 11:21 PM by Nick
IanW
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Thanks for the suggestions.

I have removed the dodgy drive and installed the 480Gb SSD

Tried rescue disk, it was able to see the backups on the external USB drive and the SSD, it all seemed to set up correctly and start to restore the 235Gb out of 253Gb (18Gb free space) C drive from the backup to the SSD (says "attempting trim operation")

But before the 0% moved on the monitor goes blank. It says it is in power saving mode, shouldn't do that so soon, I wonder if the monitor signal has been cut, unable to get the screen back. Now I do not know if anything is happening again. Sometimes the ext drive light is steady and sometimes pulses.

After 4.5 hours I notice the light now always steady but still a blank monitor screen, Reboot computer. Nothing has happened to the SSD. Surely it should have finished restoring by 4.5 hours, I can only assume it it just will not restore to the SSD.

It does restore to the new HD but the partition will not boot. I can't figure out how to make it boot from that partition.

So back to using the dodgy HD for a bit longer, I have now spent 3.5 days and evenings on trying to restore one small C partition!



Richard V.
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Clarification please.  You say that you booted to your rescue media and it all seemed set up correctly to restore the backup image of your "C: drive" to the SSD, but that you rebooted the system after 4.5 hours while the drive light was still lit and that nothing had happened to the SSD during that time.  On the other hand, you also say that you can restore the backup image to "the new HD", but the result isn't bootable.  I'm not really sure, but we seem to be dealing with two entirely different issues with two different ways in which you are attempting to replace your "dodgy" old hard drive.

First of all, is the backup image that you are trying to restore a complete image of the entire drive (all of its partitions) that you want to replace?  If not, if it's only an image of the OS ("C:") partition without the other system partitions required for the start-up process, restoring it will not produce a bootable result regardless of whether the target drive is an SSD or an HDD.

Secondly, before you booted to the rescue media, did you physically replace the old "dodgy" drive with whichever new drive (SSD or HDD) you want to use as its replacement, and was that replacement drive connected on the same internal port as the old one that you removed?  If done that way, any SSD or HDD with sufficient capacity should, unless the target drive itself is faulty, accept a backup image restore operation.

Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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Edited 12 May 2016 8:08 PM by Arvy
IanW
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Hi Richard,

You are correct. I wanted to replace my C drive with the SSD. When that never worked (stuck at "0% progress") I tried doing it to a new 4Tb drive. The latter copied OK but when I try to boot from it it does not work. I guess I need to create some boot files on it but have no idea how (I looked at BCDEdit but I did not know for sure what to do) At least I have a "good" copy of the C drive on the 4Tb in case the dodgy one packs up completely.

The MR backups are images of individual partitions, eg the dodgy 1Tb drive has drive C, S and W on it. I backup C and W separately (S is used as a temp scratch area and does not need backing up.) From what you say it sounds like I should have backed up the complete HD containing all three drives in one go. I didn't know that. I assumed drive C would contain all the necessary boot files. The SSD would not have room anyway to restore the full HD. (BTW I have two other HDs as well and they each get backed up in the same way)

I did reboot the PC after 4.5 hours while the light was on, but then it is always on when connected anyway. I figured it should have done its job by then or it was stuck doing nothing (0% progress still after leaving it running overnight) as before. I couldn't tell as the screen went blank as soon as it started.

I removed the dodgy HD and plugged the SSD onto that same cable. But the OS seems to be a bit random as to which one will be DRIVE 0, which DRIVE 1 etc after such a switch. The 4Tb is on a different plug in the cable (where my drive F was plugged into)

I am figuring if I can get the 4Tb drive booting I can then try the software supplied with the Crucial SSD to copy the new working C drive to the SSD.

I will not be able to get back to this problem for a few days now but hope to get a Win 7 Prof CD and will try running REPAIR against the 4Tb drive to see if that will create the boot files for me.

But if you have any better ideas they would be appreciated. The problem is driving me nuts.

Once again, many thanks for your concern and help.

Regards

Ian


Nick
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Hi Ian

I wanted to replace my C drive with the SSD. When that never worked (stuck at "0% progress") I tried doing it to a new 4Tb drive. The latter copied OK but when I try to boot from it it does not work. I guess I need to create some boot files on it but have no idea how (I looked at BCDEdit but I did not know for sure what to do) At least I have a "good" copy of the C drive on the 4Tb in case the dodgy one packs up completely.

Windows systems contain partitions that do not have drive letters but are required to boot Windows. Please see here:

http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Windows+Partitions

When imaging a system to transfer Windows you should use the 'Create an image of the partitions required to backup and restore Windows' option in Reflect. 

http://forum.macrium.com/uploads/images/831fe2d5-ffad-40f2-8a6d-1b02.png

Please Note: As your system is Windows 7 then it is likely to be MBR. A  4TB disk cannot boot on a legacy MBR system as the maximum disk size for MBR systems is 2TB.

Hope this helps

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

Edited 12 May 2016 9:28 PM by Nick
Richard V.
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=IanW -- Hi Richard, [...] You are correct. I wanted to replace my C drive with the SSD. [...] the dodgy 1Tb drive has drive C, S and W on it.

Ian, what you are actually going to replace is not just your so-called "C drive", but that entire "dodgy 1Tb drive".  The physical drive (the piece of hardware) that is to be replaced has multiple logical partitions on it: "C:", "S:", "W:" and at least one other without any so-called "drive letter" assigned to it.  I know it can be confusing, but so-called "drive letters" are not assigned to physical drives but to the logical partitions on the drives, and some very important partitions required for booting the system have no assigned "drive letter" at all.  Any such "letterless" system partitions must be included in at least one of your backup images and they must be restored along with the OS ("C:") partition to whatever replacement drive you want to use for booting your machine.

It's up to you how you want to accomplish that.  All of the "dodgy" drive's partitions can be included in a single backup image of that entire physical drive as I suggested and then restored from that single image to one new drive or selectively to several, but keeping any "letterless" system partitions together with the OS ("C:") partition on the new SSD, if that's what you want as a bootable replacement.  Or you can follow Nick's suggestion about using Reflect's option to "Create an image of the partitions required to backup and restore Windows" and that will include the partitions necessary for a bootable replacement drive, but only those partitions.  In that case, you'd also need to create and restore one or more additional current backup images for the "S:" and "W:" partitions and anything else you may want to recover from the old drive to any new location.

Whichever route you follow, if the SSD's limited capacity is an issue for including any "letterless" system partition along with the OS ("C:") partition, you can adjust partition sizes on the destination drive as explained in this KB article.


Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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Edited 13 May 2016 2:47 PM by Arvy
IanW
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Many thanks, Richard and Nick, for your explanations. They are both very helpful. With luck I can still "backup" the "boot partition" from the dodgy HD and then start the restore process again.

Hopefully this will avoid having to rebuild Windows from scratch.

I guess this is a case of "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing" and RTFM

It still doesn't explain why MR can see the SSD, can TRIM it, but refuses to write anything to it either using Win7 or the rescue disk. I guess it is something in my hardware that upsets it.

It will be a few days before I can devote any more time to this so I will be offline for a while

Once again many thanks for your generous support, hugely appreciated

Ian








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This is just a FWIW comment. I had a SSD that would not do the trim, it just hung there. I unchecked the "trim on restore"  in the Restore options.

Can't remember what I did exactly but I convinced myself the drive was trimmed using OS commands before starting the no-trim restore.
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