Creating Oracle VirtualBox snapshot (P2V)


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andrewc
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We are creating a process such that we want to have a bootable VirtualBox snapshot of a physical machine at the end of development cycle. This snapshot will then be archived on a USB disk.
I am of course using Reflect to create "images" of the drives of the physical machine on the recommended  backup schedule to an external disk.
But I am unclear as to the best practice to create the bootable Virtual Machine?
Should I
a) use "Macrium ReDeploy"
or
b) Convert the "images" to VHD's and then boot the VM from the VHD.

Since I am working with about 2TB of disk usage, I want to get this right....

Thanks.
Andrew



Stephen
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Hi AndrewC

Thanks for posting.

You may restore your image to VHD as described in this article:

http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Restore+to+VHD

Alternatively you can create a vm guest, boot into a rescue media ISO, perform a restore and then run ReDeploy.

http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Re-deploying+Windows+to+new+hardware+using+Macrium+ReDeploy



Kind regards

Stephen - Macrium Support


andrewc
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Yup, got it, I realise there are two approaches but my original question stands.

What method of the two is more likely to be most efficient, or faster, or less likely to give problems?

Stephen
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As you are restoring an image to a virtual disk in both cases it would take roughly the same amount of time to complete and should not cause problems using either option. It comes down to personal preference.

If it help to know, I prefer restoring images to a virtual machine.




Kind regards

Stephen - Macrium Support


johnmsch
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Curious as to what the originator of this thread ended up doing and how it worked.

I'm about to tackle this issue myself.  I have a full backup of a Windows 10 machine that I want to virtualize and have been reading through posts here and the documentation to familiarize myself with the process.  In my case, there was a major malfunction of the motherboard of the machine Win 10 was running on.  As I understand it, the steps would be:
1) Create a virtual disk on another machine
2) Restore the backup image to it
3) Run redeploy on it
4) Create a virtual machine using that virtual disk (I'm using VirtualBox)
5) Cross my fingers and boot up the VM

BTW, I'm on Reflect v7


Edited 21 July 2017 4:33 AM by johnmsch
jphughan
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Yes the above process would work. You could also create the VM with its virtual disk first, boot the VM into Rescue Media using the Rescue ISO, and then just run the restore and ReDeploy in the same "session".

Alternatively, users on Reflect V7 could use Macrium's own viBoot technology, which is explicitly designed for this purpose and would be much faster since you wouldn't even have to perform a restore into a VM at all, never mind running ReDeploy; instead, you can just boot the Reflect image directly.  The catch is that you would have to switch from VirtualBox to Hyper-V, which is only available on the Pro versions of Windows 8 and above, although it's also usually a lot faster than other virtualization platforms since it's a Type 1 hypervisor, whereas everything else on Windows is necessarily a Type 2 hypervisor. More info about viBoot here, though you can skip the section on downloading and installing since it's now built into V7: http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Macrium+viBoot

Edited 21 July 2017 4:57 AM by jphughan
jphughan
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One additional note: If the host you intend to virtualize is running Windows 7 AND is set up for UEFI booting, i.e. its system disk uses GPT rather than MBR partition layout, then you'll have to restore the image to an MBR disk following this guide, since hypervisors seem not to support booting Windows 7 guests in UEFI mode. More info about that here. Other than that specific combination though, you shouldn't have any issues or extra steps required.

Edited 21 July 2017 3:53 PM by jphughan
andrewc
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johnmsch - 21 July 2017 4:32 AM
Curious as to what the originator of this thread ended up doing and how it worked.

I'm about to tackle this issue myself.  I have a full backup of a Windows 10 machine that I want to virtualize and have been reading through posts here and the documentation to familiarize myself with the process.  In my case, there was a major malfunction of the motherboard of the machine Win 10 was running on.  As I understand it, the steps would be:
1) Create a virtual disk on another machine
2) Restore the backup image to it
3) Run redeploy on it
4) Create a virtual machine using that virtual disk (I'm using VirtualBox)
5) Cross my fingers and boot up the VM

BTW, I'm on Reflect v7

Fortunately I never needed to do this....I have not had the machine go down.
 As an aside, I have been using VMWare vCenter standalone converter to take a snapshot of the machine ( creating a bootable VMWare VM) at the end of a development cycle and archiving that on an external disk as a 'snapshot in time' VM. I must say the vCenter converter is quite impressive as you can create the VM while the machine is running.


johnmsch
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jphughan - 21 July 2017 4:35 AM
Yes the above process would work. You could also create the VM with its virtual disk first, boot the VM into Rescue Media using the Rescue ISO, and then just run the restore and ReDeploy in the same "session".

Alternatively, users on Reflect V7 could use Macrium's own viBoot technology, which is explicitly designed for this purpose and would be much faster since you wouldn't even have to perform a restore into a VM at all, never mind running ReDeploy; instead, you can just boot the Reflect image directly.  The catch is that you would have to switch from VirtualBox to Hyper-V, which is only available on the Pro versions of Windows 8 and above, although it's also usually a lot faster than other virtualization platforms since it's a Type 1 hypervisor, whereas everything else on Windows is necessarily a Type 2 hypervisor. More info about viBoot here, though you can skip the section on downloading and installing since it's now built into V7: http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Macrium+viBoot

Ah, ok, I'm going to go that route (boot the VM into Rescue Media...).  Sounds like the way to go for me.

I had considered using HyperV, since I've been working with it at work for years.  However, I'm running Win 7 Ultimate x64 on my new build.  Never liked Win 8, and absolutely despise Win 10.  Not really worried about speed, as my new rig is a Ryzen screamer.  The VirtualBox VMs I've been testing on this new rig run really fast!

Thanks again for all the great responses.


johnmsch
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andrewc - 21 July 2017 3:32 PM
johnmsch - 21 July 2017 4:32 AM
Curious as to what the originator of this thread ended up doing and how it worked.

I'm about to tackle this issue myself.  I have a full backup of a Windows 10 machine that I want to virtualize and have been reading through posts here and the documentation to familiarize myself with the process.  In my case, there was a major malfunction of the motherboard of the machine Win 10 was running on.  As I understand it, the steps would be:
1) Create a virtual disk on another machine
2) Restore the backup image to it
3) Run redeploy on it
4) Create a virtual machine using that virtual disk (I'm using VirtualBox)
5) Cross my fingers and boot up the VM

BTW, I'm on Reflect v7

Fortunately I never needed to do this....I have not had the machine go down.
 As an aside, I have been using VMWare vCenter standalone converter to take a snapshot of the machine ( creating a bootable VMWare VM) at the end of a development cycle and archiving that on an external disk as a 'snapshot in time' VM. I must say the vCenter converter is quite impressive as you can create the VM while the machine is running.


I did read a lot about that standalone converter.  May give it a shot at a later date, ,but for this project, where the Win10 machine died, I don't really have that option.

Thanks

GO

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