Moving to a larger internal SSD drive ?


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Wayne Powell
Wayne Powell
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Looking for the BEST way to move or migrate my entire Internal magnetic Hard drive to a larger SSD internal Drive. Should I CLONE my disk before upgrading or is a Full Back up sufficient ? Presently a 1TB internal and wishing to move to a 2TB internal Hard Drive. Hope to make it as hassle free as possible. Any help would be much appreciated. I am presently backing up a Full once a month and Differentials once a week. Thanks in advance.
jphughan
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You can do whatever is most convenient.  If you're already capturing backups anyway, you might want to simply swap the drives and then restore that image backup to the new disk right after the backup is performed, which will save you needing to have both the old and new drives connected simultaneously.  Or you can clone one drive straight to the other.  Either way, make sure your Rescue Media works before you do this just in case, because after you perform your clone/restore and try to boot your system from the new drive for the first time, you MIGHT need to boot into Rescue Media and run Fix Boot Problems.  On that subject, even if you intend to keep the 1TB drive installed going forward (perhaps to repurpose it as a data drive?), I would recommend that your first boot attempt from the new drive be performed with the old drive disconnected.

Other than that, the only other suggestion I'll make is to make sure that you "stage" the larger partition sizing as part of your clone/restore.  If you just choose "Copy selected partitions" without making any adjustments, Reflect will maintain all of your current partition sizes, which means you'll end up with a bunch of unallocated space left over on the new disk.  If your Windows partition is NOT the last partition on the disk, you will then have some difficulty expanding that partition to use the extra space.  So it's easier to specify as part of the clone/restore operation itself that you want the destination partition to be created larger than the source.  That process is described as Steps 4 and 5 of this article, which covers a clone operation, but it works the same way for an image restore except the "Cloned Partition Properties" link reads "Restored Partition Properties".  The trick is to avoid using "Copy selected partitions" and instead drag the individual partitions down from the source and destination, working left to right.  When you drag down a partition you want to resize, make sure you change its properties before you continue dragging down subsequent partitions.  Note also that you can define a partition size in terms of how much free space you want to leave, which might be easier to work with in this situation because you can simply add up the total sizes of any remaining partitions on the source disk to figure out how much space needs to be left to allow you to drag those down, and then Reflect will resize your current partition accordingly.  Good luck!

Wayne Powell
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jphughan - 18 January 2019 9:48 PM
You can do whatever is most convenient.  If you're already capturing backups anyway, you might want to simply swap the drives and then restore that image backup to the new disk right after the backup is performed, which will save you needing to have both the old and new drives connected simultaneously.  Or you can clone one drive straight to the other.  Either way, make sure your Rescue Media works before you do this just in case, because after you perform your clone/restore and try to boot your system from the new drive for the first time, you MIGHT need to boot into Rescue Media and run Fix Boot Problems.  On that subject, even if you intend to keep the 1TB drive installed going forward (perhaps to repurpose it as a data drive?), I would recommend that your first boot attempt from the new drive be performed with the old drive disconnected.

Other than that, the only other suggestion I'll make is to make sure that you "stage" the larger partition sizing as part of your clone/restore.  If you just choose "Copy selected partitions" without making any adjustments, Reflect will maintain all of your current partition sizes, which means you'll end up with a bunch of unallocated space left over on the new disk.  If your Windows partition is NOT the last partition on the disk, you will then have some difficulty expanding that partition to use the extra space.  So it's easier to specify as part of the clone/restore operation itself that you want the destination partition to be created larger than the source.  That process is described as Steps 4 and 5 of this article, which covers a clone operation, but it works the same way for an image restore except the "Cloned Partition Properties" link reads "Restored Partition Properties".  The trick is to avoid using "Copy selected partitions" and instead drag the individual partitions down from the source and destination, working left to right.  When you drag down a partition you want to resize, make sure you change its properties before you continue dragging down subsequent partitions.  Note also that you can define a partition size in terms of how much free space you want to leave, which might be easier to work with in this situation because you can simply add up the total sizes of any remaining partitions on the source disk to figure out how much space needs to be left to allow you to drag those down, and then Reflect will resize your current partition accordingly.  Good luck!

OK, So I am liking the clone option that you describe. I am having a brain fog moment. I have my back ups on an external USB hard drive and as I understand it windows cannot be booted from such a device. So If I were to wish to clone from my USB Back Up to the Newer and larger internal SSD drive would I have to remove the existing Hard drive after windows booted up ( like a hot swap ) or would I use rescue media to boot and clone after changing to the new SSD ? Just a little foggy area here ( I am getting old ). I would like to clone from BU disk to New disk with out having both internal drives installed at the same time. This way I only have to remove the tower once rather than twice as they are not user friendly in moving them. Hope I have made this clear ? And as always many thanks to you.
jphughan
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I think you're mixing up terms here.  A clone operation is defined as copying directly from a source drive to the destination drive, so in a clone situation, your backup hard drive would not be involved.  If you're talking about using a backup stored on your USB backup drive to set up your new hard drive, that would be an image restore operation, not a clone.  But you're correct that you can't boot from a drive that just has backups stored on it -- but that's exactly why bootable Rescue Media exists.  You absolutely CANNOT simply boot Windows from your existing hard drive and then disconnect it.  Windows would immediately blue screen if you tried that.  But again, that's why Rescue Media exists.

If you don't want to have your current and new drives connected at the same time, then here's what you'd do:

1. Run a backup of your existing drive to your USB drive.
2. Create Rescue Media onto a disc or USB flash drive if you haven't already, and verify that you can boot your PC from it.
3. Shut down your PC, remove your current drive, install the new one, and boot your PC from your Rescue Media.
4. In the Rescue environment, perform an image restore from the appropriate backup on your USB backup drive onto your new hard drive, making sure to change the partition size as I described above.
5. Reboot your PC.  If it doesn't immediately boot up as normal, boot your PC from Rescue Media again and run Fix Boot Problems.  Then restart it again and see if it boots normally

Edited 19 January 2019 3:00 AM by jphughan
Wayne Powell
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jphughan - 19 January 2019 2:56 AM
I think you're mixing up terms here.  A clone operation is defined as copying directly from a source drive to the destination drive, so in a clone situation, your backup hard drive would not be involved.  If you're talking about using a backup stored on your USB backup drive to set up your new hard drive, that would be an image restore operation, not a clone.  But you're correct that you can't boot from a drive that just has backups stored on it -- but that's exactly why bootable Rescue Media exists.  You absolutely CANNOT simply boot Windows from your existing hard drive and then disconnect it.  Windows would immediately blue screen if you tried that.  But again, that's why Rescue Media exists.

If you don't want to have your current and new drives connected at the same time, then here's what you'd do:

1. Run a backup of your existing drive to your USB drive.
2. Create Rescue Media onto a disc or USB flash drive if you haven't already, and verify that you can boot your PC from it.
3. Shut down your PC, remove your current drive, install the new one, and boot your PC from your Rescue Media.
4. In the Rescue environment, perform an image restore from the appropriate backup on your USB backup drive onto your new hard drive, making sure to change the partition size as I described above.
5. Reboot your PC.  If it doesn't immediately boot up as normal, boot your PC from Rescue Media again and run Fix Boot Problems.  Then restart it again and see if it boots normally

Yes, OK I get that and yes I was confusing terms for sure. This is the option I would like to do. I have my Rescue media on a flash drive (As you so aptly told me about awhile back) and I made sure it booted then , about 6 months ago. Should I update that rescue media or should that be fine? I think I am on Win 10 1803 64 bit. You have been a real life saver by breaking things down to an understandable and usable level . Thank You.

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Happy to help! Chances are the Rescue Media you have would work fine, but updating occasionally is generally a good idea because sometimes Reflect updates have fixes or enhancements that pertain to the Rescue environment. Good luck! Smile
Edited 19 January 2019 3:49 AM by jphughan
Wayne Powell
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jphughan - 19 January 2019 3:48 AM
Happy to help! Chances are the Rescue Media you have would work fine, but updating occasionally is generally a good idea because sometimes Reflect updates have fixes or enhancements that pertain to the Rescue environment. Good luck! Smile

Yes. I know that Macrium made it easier to create that media through updates. Thanks so much again. I truly appreciate the clarifications.
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jphughan - 19 January 2019 2:56 AM
I think you're mixing up terms here.  A clone operation is defined as copying directly from a source drive to the destination drive, so in a clone situation, your backup hard drive would not be involved.  If you're talking about using a backup stored on your USB backup drive to set up your new hard drive, that would be an image restore operation, not a clone.  But you're correct that you can't boot from a drive that just has backups stored on it -- but that's exactly why bootable Rescue Media exists.  You absolutely CANNOT simply boot Windows from your existing hard drive and then disconnect it.  Windows would immediately blue screen if you tried that.  But again, that's why Rescue Media exists.

If you don't want to have your current and new drives connected at the same time, then here's what you'd do:

1. Run a backup of your existing drive to your USB drive.
2. Create Rescue Media onto a disc or USB flash drive if you haven't already, and verify that you can boot your PC from it.
3. Shut down your PC, remove your current drive, install the new one, and boot your PC from your Rescue Media.
4. In the Rescue environment, perform an image restore from the appropriate backup on your USB backup drive onto your new hard drive, making sure to change the partition size as I described above.
5. Reboot your PC
.  If it doesn't immediately boot up as normal, boot your PC from Rescue Media again and run Fix Boot Problems.  Then restart it again and see if it boots normally
https://forum.macrium.com/Topic24497.aspx
This earlier Thread above and here involve using Restore to a New Drive ( or computer) via Ext Rescue Media AND Ext Drive Image but your similar Step 4 prior (minus a Partition size chg here) was followed by .............
#5: After the restore completes, but before you reboot, run ReDeploy according to the steps outlined in the link I posted. (my edit: Macrium ReDeploy overcomes issues with Windows boot processes to run a Windows installation on new hardware.......)
Why was ReDeploy needed there and Not Here?
Contemplating an equal Replacement of 6.5 Yr Old Drive B4 it tanks. Thanks as always.


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jphughan
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^ Because this thread involves a drive swap in the same system. ReDeploy is used when you’re restoring/cloning your drive with the intent of using it in a different system with different hardware, as was the case with the thread you linked above. ReDeploy could technically also be used WITHOUT a clone/restore operation beforehand if you wanted to replace certain components of your existing system, particularly the motherboard or RAID controller.

The reason ReDeploy exists is because in order to shorten boot time, Windows makes certain assumptions about what hardware exists on the system based on what was there last time it booted, because rediscovering all of your hardware for every boot would take quite a bit of time, as you might have seen when Windows does this the first time it boots after a clean install. And in 99.99999% of cases, that discovery would be totally pointless because boot-critical hardware doesn’t change often. The problem the assumption model creates is that if you DO change boot-critical hardware, those stored assumptions are no longer valid, and Windows therefore loads the wrong drivers (or not enough drivers), and then it simply fails to boot. ReDeploy is able to scan your system’s hardware and then reconfigure Windows and if necessary inject additional necessary drivers so that Windows can still boot correctly even after boot-critical hardware has changed. But the hard drive is generally not a boot-critical device from a driver standpoint, so ReDeploy is unnecessary for a drive swap in an existing system. The only exception would be if you’re switching from a SATA to NVMe SSD or vice versa, in which case you will need ReDeploy if your system is in AHCI mode — but not if you have a RAID controller enabled, including Intel’s Rapid Storage controller that’s available on many systems, since in that case the RAID controller abstracts the storage interface from the OS, which means the OS doesn’t have to worry about it.
Edited 19 January 2019 5:16 PM by jphughan
Wayne Powell
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jphughan - 19 January 2019 5:16 PM
^ Because this thread involves a drive swap in the same system. ReDeploy is used when you’re restoring/cloning your drive with the intent of using it in a different system with different hardware, as was the case with the thread you linked above. ReDeploy could technically also be used WITHOUT a clone/restore operation beforehand if you wanted to replace certain components of your existing system, particularly the motherboard or RAID controller.

The reason ReDeploy exists is because in order to shorten boot time, Windows makes certain assumptions about what hardware exists on the system based on what was there last time it booted, because rediscovering all of your hardware for every boot would take quite a bit of time, as you might have seen when Windows does this the first time it boots after a clean install. And in 99.99999% of cases, that discovery would be totally pointless because boot-critical hardware doesn’t change often. The problem the assumption model creates is that if you DO change boot-critical hardware, those stored assumptions are no longer valid, and Windows therefore loads the wrong drivers (or not enough drivers), and then it simply fails to boot. ReDeploy is able to scan your system’s hardware and then reconfigure Windows and if necessary inject additional necessary drivers so that Windows can still boot correctly even after boot-critical hardware has changed. But the hard drive is generally not a boot-critical device from a driver standpoint, so ReDeploy is unnecessary for a drive swap in an existing system. The only exception would be if you’re switching from a SATA to NVMe SSD or vice versa, in which case you will need ReDeploy if your system is in AHCI mode — but not if you have a RAID controller enabled, including Intel’s Rapid Storage controller that’s available on many systems, since in that case the RAID controller abstracts the storage interface from the OS, which means the OS doesn’t have to worry about it.

So what you are saying is that I WOULD need to use a ReDeploy because I am going to a SSD even when using it in the same system ? Am I correct in this scenario ? Not sure what AHCI is ??

GO

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