Unable to boot USB rescue disk


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JABF9977
JABF9977
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I have a dual boot EUFI laptop with 2 SSD drives.  GPT disk 1 has Linux Mint 19 installed.  GPT disk 2 has an OEM installation of Windows 10 Pro.  I purchased Macrium Reflect 7 Home Edition (version 7.2, 64 bit UEFI, build: 3957).  I successfully used this to create a disk mage of each drive.  

My hope was to have a backup and restore plan that could deal with a worst case scenario of having to do a bare metal restore on replacement drives (I know, I'm a worrier).  So, next I attempted to use the Macrium Rescue Media Builder to create a boot USB flash drive so I could do a bare metal restore if I ever needed to do that.  After running the software to create the USB flash drive with the Rescue Media setup, I rebooted the machine.  When I did this, I could see a menu with boot options of the Linux Mint and then the OEM Windows, but when I choose any of these I am presented with the Mint splash screen that normally appears when booting into Mint - however, it hangs there.  And none of those options produce a Windows login.  

What am I doing wrong?  Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.  I'm probably doing something really stupid :-)

In case it is needed, here are some of the computer specs:

Lenovo ThinkPad-X1-Extreme
Model: 20MF000CUS v: SDK0J40697 WIN
Linux Kernel: 4.18.0-13-generic x86_64 bits
Desktop: Cinnamon 3.8.9 Distro: Linux Mint 19 Tara

Drives: HDD Total Size: 1024.2GB (1.5% used)
ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 model: Samsung_SSD_970_PRO_1TB size: 1024.2GB (Desktop: Cinnamon 3.8.9 Distro: Linux Mint 19 Tara)
ID-2: /dev/nvme1n1 model: SAMSUNG_MZVLB512HAJQ size: 512.1GB (Windows 10 Pro, Lenovo OEM installation)
Mobo: LENOVO model: 20MF000CUS v: SDK0J40697 WIN serial: N/A
UEFI: LENOVO v: N2EET35W (1.17 ) date: 12/21/2018
Battery BAT0: charge: 77.0 Wh 99.9% condition: 77.0/80.4 Wh (96%)
CPU: 6 core Intel Core i7-8850H (-MT-MCP-) cache: 9216 KB
clock speeds: max: 4300 MHz 1: 1392 MHz 2: 4003 MHz 3: 3699 MHz
4: 3822 MHz 5: 4007 MHz 6: 3832 MHz 7: 3795 MHz 8: 3941 MHz
9: 3910 MHz 10: 3875 MHz 11: 3921 MHz 12: 3779 MHz
Graphics: Card: NVIDIA GP107M [GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Mobile]
Display Server: x11 (X.Org 1.19.6 )
drivers: nouveau (unloaded: modesetting,fbdev,vesa)
Resolution: 3840x2160@60.00hz
OpenGL: renderer: NV137 version: 4.3 Mesa 18.0.5
Audio: Card-1 Intel Device a348 driver: snd_hda_intel
Card-2 NVIDIA GP107GL High Def. Audio Controller
driver: snd_hda_intel
Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.18.0-13-generic
Network: Card-1: Intel Device a370 driver: iwlwifi
IF: wlp0s20f3 state: up speed: N/A duplex: N/A
mac: 34:e1:2d:e8:2c:63
Card-2: Intel Ethernet Connection (7) I219-LM driver: e1000e
IF: enp0s31f6 state: down mac: 48:2a:e3:0d:48:54
Drives: HDD Total Size: 1024.2GB (1.5% used)
ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 model: Samsung_SSD_970_PRO_1TB size: 1024.2GB
ID-2: /dev/nvme1n1 model: SAMSUNG_MZVLB512HAJQ size: 512.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 720G used: 15G (3%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/nvme0n1p1
RAID: No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Edited 12 January 2019 5:31 PM by JABF9977
JABF9977
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Or, would I just be better off running an open source software product like Clonezilla and just get my money back for the Macrium product if it won't work?  I have a bootable Linux Mint USB stick to boot up and restore from Clonezilla.  Sometimes the open source software is a better solution... maybe that is true here also.
Edited 12 January 2019 11:22 PM by JABF9977
Flyer
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Have you tried to change your BIOS to Legacy mode and boot from that? UEFI safe mode should prevent you from booting from a USB if I remember correctly.
jphughan
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Flyer - 13 January 2019 1:25 AM
Have you tried to change your BIOS to Legacy mode and boot from that? UEFI safe mode should prevent you from booting from a USB if I remember correctly.

If you're referring to UEFI Secure Boot, that does NOT prevent booting from USB media as long as the bootloader file on that media is signed, which it would be as long as the OP used WinPE 5 or newer.  And even if the bootloader weren’t signed, switching all the way to Legacy (as opposed to UEFI without Secure Boot enabled) just to boot Rescue Media if your system normally boots in UEFI mode isn't a good idea anyway.  Not only is it inconvenient, but booting Rescue Media in Legacy mode when your system normally boots in UEFI mode (or vice versa) will cause the Fix Boot Problems function not to work properly, because the fixes the Rescue environment attempts are based on how the Rescue Media itself was booted, and if you booted it in a different mechanism than you normally use, then it will attempt the wrong fixes.  It also sounds like the OP's issue at the moment isn't that he can't get the Rescue Media to boot, but rather that his system is no longer booting normally at all.

@JABF9977, when you created the Rescue Media, did you do anything with the Windows Boot Menu option at the same time?  If not and you only used Rescue Media Builder to create a bootable flash drive, that wouldn't have affected how your PC boots into Linux or Windows.  It just copies files onto a flash drive.  Is there any chance that some sort of pending Windows update installed when you rebooted that might have created an issue?  I know that occasionally those updates include changes to the EFI bootloader, and Windows has never been particularly accommodating of multi-boot configurations unless all boot options are Windows, so I'm wondering if an update may have clobbered whatever bootloader configuration you had.  If I'm misunderstanding the issue and you simply want to verify that your Rescue Media boots, make sure you use the one-time boot menu to boot from a USB device.  Lastly, in a full bare metal recovery scenario, I'm not sure how/whether the Rescue environment and its Fix Boot Problems function would handle setting up your bootloader again.  That might still involve some manual work, although I'm not sure about that since I've never tested your type of setup.

As for CloneZilla, looking over the Limitations section of their homepage, none of those limitations exist with Reflect, and several of those sound like they could be significant limitations depending on your use case.  The inability to mount an image to recover individual files seems like it could be especially problematic, although not being able to clone to a smaller partition than the source and not being able to do online cloning/imaging both seem like they could be annoying too.  Linux doesn't allow online cloning/imaging at all since it doesn't have an equivalent to VSS, but Windows allows that, and having to restart your PC into a Rescue environment every time you wanted to perform an image/clone job and then wait for it to complete before you use your PC again seems like it would get old fast

Edited 13 January 2019 2:47 AM by jphughan
JABF9977
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jphughan - 13 January 2019 2:40 AM
Flyer - 13 January 2019 1:25 AM
Have you tried to change your BIOS to Legacy mode and boot from that? UEFI safe mode should prevent you from booting from a USB if I remember correctly.

If you're referring to UEFI Secure Boot, that does NOT prevent booting from USB media as long as the bootloader file on that media is signed, which it would be as long as the OP used WinPE 5 or newer.  And even if the bootloader weren’t signed, switching all the way to Legacy (as opposed to UEFI without Secure Boot enabled) just to boot Rescue Media if your system normally boots in UEFI mode isn't a good idea anyway.  Not only is it inconvenient, but booting Rescue Media in Legacy mode when your system normally boots in UEFI mode (or vice versa) will cause the Fix Boot Problems function not to work properly, because the fixes the Rescue environment attempts are based on how the Rescue Media itself was booted, and if you booted it in a different mechanism than you normally use, then it will attempt the wrong fixes.  It also sounds like the OP's issue at the moment isn't that he can't get the Rescue Media to boot, but rather that his system is no longer booting normally at all.

@JABF9977, when you created the Rescue Media, did you do anything with the Windows Boot Menu option at the same time?  If not and you only used Rescue Media Builder to create a bootable flash drive, that wouldn't have affected how your PC boots into Linux or Windows.  It just copies files onto a flash drive.  Is there any chance that some sort of pending Windows update installed when you rebooted that might have created an issue?  I know that occasionally those updates include changes to the EFI bootloader, and Windows has never been particularly accommodating of multi-boot configurations unless all boot options are Windows, so I'm wondering if an update may have clobbered whatever bootloader configuration you had.  If I'm misunderstanding the issue and you simply want to verify that your Rescue Media boots, make sure you use the one-time boot menu to boot from a USB device.  Lastly, in a full bare metal recovery scenario, I'm not sure how/whether the Rescue environment and its Fix Boot Problems function would handle setting up your bootloader again.  That might still involve some manual work, although I'm not sure about that since I've never tested your type of setup.

As for CloneZilla, looking over the Limitations section of their homepage, none of those limitations exist with Reflect, and several of those sound like they could be significant limitations depending on your use case.  The inability to mount an image to recover individual files seems like it could be especially problematic, although not being able to clone to a smaller partition than the source and not being able to do online cloning/imaging both seem like they could be annoying too.  Linux doesn't allow online cloning/imaging at all since it doesn't have an equivalent to VSS, but Windows allows that, and having to restart your PC into a Rescue environment every time you wanted to perform an image/clone job and then wait for it to complete before you use your PC again seems like it would get old fast

Thank you very much for your help.  My computer is EUFI but has never had secure boot enabled.  I was told that it is best to disable it prior to setting up Linux Mint in a dual-boot system with Windows 10.  You're correct in that I simply want to verify that the Rescue Media boots.  I will try the USB setup again and then check to use the one-time boot menu
to boot from the USB device. 

I already have Macrium Reflect set up to keep an image of each drive on a partition dedicated on one of the SSDs for this purpose.  This is working great, and I have no issues with that.  My concern is that if that drive itself would die and need to be replaced, I would ideally like to have a way of installing a new SSD and recovering my entire setup for this computer (it took a great deal of effort and time to get this dual-boot system working exactly the way I wanted it).  My data files are always backed up to a cloud drive, so no worries about my data files.  It's the system setup I don't want to lose.  I'm trying with my limited computer skills to understand if there is a way to have Macrium help me in a worse case scenario of having to install a new SSD and recovering my entire dual boot setup/system from there.  I'd really like to avoid setting this thing up from scratch again.  I think I'd lose my mind.

I am just not understanding how to back up a system so that once I boot from a USB, is there a way to image the new installed SSD so that the 2-drive dual boot system is working again.  Thanks in advance for your patience with me.  I'm a newbie at this for sure :-)
jphughan
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Unfortunately I'm not the right person to ask about how easy it would be to recover your specific setup, and yours is indeed more complex, because not only do you have a dual boot setup, you've got your OSes split across physically separate SSDs rather than having both OSes on a single SSD that's split into multiple partitions.  UEFI booting makes things even more interesting here because unlike Legacy BIOS booting where you simply choose a physical device to boot from, UEFI booting from storage devices involves specifying an actual bootloader file on a specific partition of a specific disk, and that boot entry has to actually be registered into the UEFI firmware.  So there are cases where you might completely restore everything that was on the drive, but if the restored bootloader file isn't registered into the system's UEFI firmware, it won't boot normally.  The Fix Boot Problems mechanism on Reflect Rescue Media can normally fix that, but the additional wrinkle in your case is that I'm guessing you're using a Linux-based bootloader to handle your multi-boot setup (because Windows Boot Manager doesn't support pointing to Linux), and I have no idea how or whether the Fix Boot Problems routine in Rescue Media would interact with that in terms of seeing it and getting the path to that bootloader registered into the UEFI firmware.  And then if you ever had to replace the SSD that contains your Windows environment, the bootloader entry for Windows located within your Linux bootloader might break, and once again I don't know whether Fix Boot Problems would handle updating a Linux-based bootloader to add/fix a pointer to a Windows partition.  My guess is that you'd probably end up with a boot configuration that points directly to Windows Boot Manager, meaning you'd only be able to boot into Windows.

@Froggie, do you have any insight here?  I know you've dabbled in multi-boot setups like this.

Chris
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Hi @JABF9977

Thanks for posting. Please see the following KB on further help with the creation of rescue media:
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW72/Creating+rescue+media

When creating USB based media on an EFI system the ​'Enable Multi Boot (MBR/UEFI)' option should be selected by default, if it isn't please ensure that it is selected before the build process. In addition you will also need to ensure the BIOS settings have USB booting as higher order than any SATA ports. It has also been reported that you may need to press a key (F2 or F12) to present the BIOS boot menu on some systems. For all BIOS related settings please consult your motherboard manual.

The BCD (Boot Configu​​​​​ration Database) will most definitely not be affected by the creation of USB rescue media. The only time this occurs as @jphughan has mentioned, is when you create a boot menu entry. But, this will leave other boot menu entries unaffected, the add of a new entry is a non destructive process.

Kind regards.​​

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Macrium Reflect Development & Support
KnowledgeBase: http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/
YouTube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Macrium

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JABF9977
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Chris - 14 January 2019 6:59 AM
Hi @JABF9977

Thanks for posting. Please see the following KB on further help with the creation of rescue media:
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW72/Creating+rescue+media

When creating USB based media on an EFI system the 'Enable Multi Boot (MBR/UEFI)' option should be selected by default, if it isn't please ensure that it is selected before the build process. In addition you will also need to ensure the BIOS settings have USB booting as higher order than any SATA ports. It has also been reported that you may need to press a key (F2 or F12) to present the BIOS boot menu on some systems. For all BIOS related settings please consult your motherboard manual.

The BCD (Boot Configuration Database) will most definitely not be affected by the creation of USB rescue media. The only time this occurs as @jphughan has mentioned, is when you create a boot menu entry. But, this will leave other boot menu entries unaffected, the add of a new entry is a non destructive process.

Kind regards.

I tried to get it to work and somehow my Grub2 menu was damaged.  Then, thinking I was okay because I had the Macrium image I attempted to restore the drive image in hopes that this would fix that.  Now I have an older image on the SSD but it totally borked my computer.  I am going to have to reinstall Windows 10 and also my Linux Mint.  I purchased this product as a safety net so I would never have to do something like this from scratch again.  It takes a long long time to configure something like this and is a living nightmare. 

This Marcrium product is probably great for 98% of the people who buy it.  For me though, it destroyed countless hours of work.  I would like to get my money back though.  Paying for a product that did this to my computer just adds to the misery :-(
Edited 14 January 2019 7:51 PM by JABF9977
Chris
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JABF9977 - 14 January 2019 7:50 PM
Chris - 14 January 2019 6:59 AM
Hi @JABF9977

Thanks for posting. Please see the following KB on further help with the creation of rescue media:
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW72/Creating+rescue+media

When creating USB based media on an EFI system the 'Enable Multi Boot (MBR/UEFI)' option should be selected by default, if it isn't please ensure that it is selected before the build process. In addition you will also need to ensure the BIOS settings have USB booting as higher order than any SATA ports. It has also been reported that you may need to press a key (F2 or F12) to present the BIOS boot menu on some systems. For all BIOS related settings please consult your motherboard manual.

The BCD (Boot Configuration Database) will most definitely not be affected by the creation of USB rescue media. The only time this occurs as @jphughan has mentioned, is when you create a boot menu entry. But, this will leave other boot menu entries unaffected, the add of a new entry is a non destructive process.

Kind regards.

I tried to get it to work and somehow my Grub2 menu was damaged.  Then, thinking I was okay because I had the Macrium image I attempted to restore the drive image in hopes that this would fix that.  Now I have an older image on the SSD but it totally borked my computer.  I am going to have to reinstall Windows 10 and also my Linux Mint.  I purchased this product as a safety net so I would never have to do something like this from scratch again.  It takes a long long time to configure something like this and is a living nightmare. 

This Marcrium product is probably great for 98% of the people who buy it.  For me though, it destroyed countless hours of work.  I would like to get my money back though.  Paying for a product that did this to my computer just adds to the misery :-(

HI @JABF9977

Thanks for posting back and apologies for the delay in replying to your post. The GRUB2 boot loader will try and occupy NVRAM as part of the EFI booting system​ and it appears that this has been affected. Please can you raise a support ticket by visiting https://www.macrium.com/support or email support (at) macrium (dot) com so that we can investigate further.

Kind regards.​​

--
Chris Bamford
Macrium Reflect Development & Support
KnowledgeBase: http://knowledgebase.macrium.com/
YouTube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Macrium

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