Clone Failed-Error 9-Unable To Solve


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Kidderman3
Kidderman3
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I have been trying to clone the hard drive from a laptop onto a new, higher capacity drive which is in an external caddy. Windows recognises the new drive. I have used Reflect successfully for several clones in the past, however on this occasion-despite several attempts-I have been unable to complete the cloning process. I start the process as I have done in the past.
Kidderman3
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Kidderman3 - 5 January 2019 8:14 PM
I have been trying to clone the hard drive from a laptop onto a new, higher capacity drive which is in an external caddy. Windows recognises the new drive, to which I have assigned the letter 'F'. I have used Reflect successfully for several clones in the past, however on this occasion-despite several attempts-I have been unable to complete the cloning process. I start the process as I have done in the past, however when it gets to 1%, I get the message: 'Clone failed. Error 9'. At the same time, I get another message: 'The disk must be formatted before cloning'. I go through the formatting process and am told that the disk has been formatted. When I check the drive's status in Windows, it shows the file system as being RAW. I don't understand what that is, however I'm sure the system should be NTFS. I format again using Windows disk manager. The new disk's file system returns to NTFS. I then try the clone procedure again. I get the same responses as detailed above and find that the file system on the new drive has gone back to RAW. In Reflect's loaderrors notepad, the text reads: 'Error opening directory: F:\ Error: The system cannot find the path specified.'   I'd be very grateful for any advice and guidance which may help me to solve this problem.


Kidderman3
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Kidderman3 - 5 January 2019 8:14 PM
I have been trying to clone the hard drive from a laptop onto a new, higher capacity drive which is in an external caddy. Windows recognises the new drive. I have used Reflect successfully for several clones in the past, however on this occasion-despite several attempts-I have been unable to complete the cloning process. I start the process as I have done in the past.

Sorry, last post went on prematurely. After I select the source and destination drives (I've given the new drive the letter 'F'), I start the cloning process as I usually do. When it reaches 1%, I get the message: Clone failed-Error 9. At the same time, I am advised that the new disk has to be formatted. I've formatted it several times and tried cloning again, but the error message and instruction to format appear again. After attempting to clone, I've found that the file system on the new drive, changes from NTFS to RAW. I don't know what RAW is, however I'm pretty sure that the drive's file system should be NTFS. I change it back to NTFS each time the cloning process fails. There is a loaderror notepad entry in Reflect when the cloning process fails. It reads: 'Error opening directory: F:\  Error: The system cannot find the path specified.' I'm at a loss to figure out why this is happening. I'd be very grateful for any advice and guidance which may help me resolve this issue and clone the drive successfully.
jphughan
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RAW means there's a partition defined but not formatted to any file system.  That happens because part of the clone process involves creating partitions from scratch, so there's no point manually setting anything up on the destination as NTFS before each new attempt.  Anything you do will get overwritten by the clone operation anyway, and the clone doesn't need anything done on the destination first; the disk can be completely unprepped.  Have you tried just using that destination drive normally to see if perhaps the drive is faulty?  Have you tried a different caddy/adapter?  Have you tried capturing an image of the source drive to a file somewhere just to rule out a problem with the source drive causing this issue?

Kidderman3
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Hi, I copied a few files from the laptop onto the destination drive. That was successful, although I’ll run a health check (Seagate has a good free program) to be sure that the destination drive is ok. I have two other caddys, and will try again cloning to the destination drive with each of them tomorrow. I’m not sure how to capture an image of the source drive to a file, however I’ll find out. I’ll post outcomes as soon as I’ve run tests . Thanks for your post.
jphughan
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Kidderman3 - 5 January 2019 11:40 PM
Hi, I copied a few files from the laptop onto the destination drive. That was successful, although I’ll run a health check (Seagate has a good free program) to be sure that the destination drive is ok. I have two other caddys, and will try again cloning to the destination drive with each of them tomorrow. I’m not sure how to capture an image of the source drive to a file, however I’ll find out. I’ll post outcomes as soon as I’ve run tests . Thanks for your post.

To capture an image of the drive, from the Create a Backup tab in Reflect, select the drive you're trying to clone, and click "Image this drive" rather than "Clone this drive".  Then just choose a location to store the image.  Technically you could temporarily format your intended clone destination as NTFS and use that as the image target, but since the purpose is to isolate variables here, it would be better to use some other drive as the image destination.  Do you perhaps have a general purpose external hard drive with sufficient capacity to store a compressed image of that source drive?  Expect the image file size to be roughly 50-60% of the amount of data on the drive using Reflect's default compression.

Kidderman3
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I do have another external drive with sufficient capacity to store an image of the source drive. I will follow your instructions and post the outcome as soon as it is done. Thanks.
Kidderman3
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Kidderman3 - 6 January 2019 12:12 AM
I do have another external drive with sufficient capacity to store an image of the source drive. I will follow your instructions and post the outcome as soon as it is done. Thanks.

Ok, imaging of the source drive onto an external drive was completed successfully (using the same caddy where I'd installed the new destination drive for cloning). I tried two other caddy's and attempted the clone. I got the same error message  (Clone failed-error 9) Idid a Windows disk check on the new destination drive. No problems were found. I downloaded Seagate Seatools and ran both short and long tests on the new drive. All tests resulted in a Pass. Each time I attempt the clone, a window appears saying: 'You need to format this drive before you can use it'. I format the drive successfully'. The formatting works every time, however the error message appears again after attempting to clone. After each attempt and the 'Clone failed-error 9' message, I see the following message--in red--on the Macrium page: 'Clone failed-Error 9-Read failed-1117-The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error'. It's all pretty confusing, to say the least. I opened a support ticket and sent the Log information as requested. I had a response which was a .zip file containing Log information which I don't understand.I'm unable to see any advice or guidance in the file's contents which would help me in solving the problem. This is so strange and frustrating as I have successfully cloned drives on at least four occasions in the past using Reflect, two of which involved the use of the laptop from which I'm attempting to clone on this occasion. If the information above rings a bell with any members, I'd welcome further advice.
jphughan
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Very strange. This is a long shot, but if you still have that image backup, try restoring that image backup onto the intended clone destination drive. That achieves the same end result as if you had cloned the drive at the time of the image. I admit I’m not optimistic this will work if your clone attempts to that destination consistently fail and you’ve confirmed the source can be imaged successfully, but since I also can’t account for why the clone is failing if the destination seems ok, I figured it may be worth trying.

You don’t have to format the drive beforehand. Windows just pops that dialog up when it sees an unformatted partition, since those aren’t usable for “normal” operations, but that doesn’t stop Reflect from working with the disk.
Kidderman3
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jphughan - 7 January 2019 3:05 PM
Very strange. This is a long shot, but if you still have that image backup, try restoring that image backup onto the intended clone destination drive. That achieves the same end result as if you had cloned the drive at the time of the image. I admit I’m not optimistic this will work if your clone attempts to that destination consistently fail and you’ve confirmed the source can be imaged successfully, but since I also can’t account for why the clone is failing if the destination seems ok, I figured it may be worth trying.You don’t have to format the drive beforehand. Windows just pops that dialog up when it sees an unformatted partition, since those aren’t usable for “normal” operations, but that doesn’t stop Reflect from working with the disk.

Thanks again. Is restoring the image backup the same as copying and pasting? I haven't done that before. I've also heard from Tech. Support, who tell me that the logs indicate that the source drive may be preventing the clone from happening by preventing Reflect from being able to read it in order to clone to the destination. I've run windows chkdsk on the source, which hasn't thrown up any problems with the drive. However, The Seagate Seatools program has failed the source drive on three tests, indicating that it may indeed be a problem with the source drive (the C: drive in the laptop). The laptop works fine with whatever I do, but there seems to be some kind of issue which is preventing a successful clone from it. Not sure where to go from here. I need to increase capacity in the laptop, but really don't want to contemplate starting from scratch by installing the larger drive, installing Windows and having to lose everything and find and install all my programs and data again. It would take forever. Unless there's a way of backing up the entire contents of the source drive and transferring them back to the replacement drive after installing Windows.
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