PNY Pro Elite 512GB USB 3.0 Premium Flash Drive P-FD512PRO-GE?


Author
Message
dbminter
dbminter
Expert
Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 560, Visits: 4.6K
Does anyone know, from actual experience using one, if the PNY Pro Elite 512GB USB 3.0 Premium Flash Drive P-FD512PRO-GE can be used as a Rescue Media target?  This kind of flash drive:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01E17LOL6?pf_rd_p=c2945051-950f-485c-b4df-15aac5223b10&pf_rd_r=PPG2BNW16PVW8Q503G3Z


I'm thinking of trying one out, but I believe I've had PNY flash drives in that past that could not be used as Rescue Media flash drives with Reflect because it said there were no available partitions for use.  And I know some flash drives, like most SanDisk ones I've had, I've never gotten to work as Rescue Media flash drives for various reasons.  So, I know some flash drives can't be used as Rescue Media.


Thanks!

jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
Subscribing in the hopes of an answer.  Interesting that you've had trouble with SanDisk flash drives.  I use primarily SanDisk flash drives and have never once had a problem booting from any of them on any of the several PCs I've used them with, both Legacy BIOS and UEFI mode.  My current models are the SanDisk Ultra Flair for infrequent, low capacity, and low performance use cases like Rescue Media and the like, and then an Extreme Pro USB 3.1 flash drive for higher capacity and/or higher performance use cases since it's basically an SSD on a stick in terms of performance.  It's physically quite a bit longer than the PNY unit you linked and it tops out at 256GB, but its write speeds are also quite a higher, which seems to be the differentiator for flash drives these days and is what drew me to that model.  Still, $120 for 512GB of storage with high-ish write speeds is a great deal.

Hopefully you get your answer, but if you don't and you don't want to roll the dice, if you can live with "just" 256GB flash drives, those two SanDisk models I mentioned should serve you well.

dbminter
dbminter
Expert
Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 560, Visits: 4.6K
Yes, I don't like SanDisk flash drives because I don't think I ever got one to be recognized by Reflect as a possible candidate for making Rescue Media with.  Even going back to USB 2.0 flash drives.  I got a 128 GB SanDisk Cruzer USB 3.0, I think it was, earlier in the year and Reflect wouldn't accept it for writing the Rescue Media to.  That's why I generally chose Lexar because every single Lexar flash drive bar 1 I threw at Reflect would be accepted.  I generally have been getting the 256 GB S75 USB 3.0 Lexar and had been hoping for them to make a 512 GB model.


This PNY model is the first 512 GB model I've seen from a brand I trust.  PNY have been successful candidates for me for Reflect Rescue Media in the past, so I have hopes for this model.  I just didn't want to put down $100 on a 512 GB USB 3.0 flash drive from a brand I had never used before/never heard of before only to discover it's junk.  And there was a $15 less model, too, from PNY but it had half the maximum supported read and write speeds.  So, I figure, for just $15 more, I can potentially double the maximum read/write speeds.  Might as well go for it.


Still, the point may be moot.  I've been thinking of trying this Samsung SSD HDD.  It's got Type A and Type C USB 3.1 cables so I know I can use it.  And there's the possibility I can get faster USB 3.1 speeds with the Type-C cable.  I just don't know if this one small port on my Dell is a Type C connector or not.  If it's not, I can still use the Type A cable.  I just don't know if I can boot from it/Reflect will format it for booting.  And, of course, I'd have to test that Reflect recognized it, both in Windows and in WinPE.

jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
Very odd.  I've never had an issue with those flash drives being recognized and used directly by the Rescue Media wizard, or any other brand of flash drive I've tried, for that matter -- as long as it's set up using MBR and either FAT32 and NTFS rather than GPT and/or exFAT.  Most flash drive seem to ship pre-formatted for exFAT these days since it's the only file system that's read/write on all reasonably recent OSes without any third-party tools AND supports files larger than 4GB (WinXP doesn't get to join the exFAT party).  The downside is that exFAT isn't bootable in either BIOS or UEFI mode.

The documentation of your system should tell you what your mysterious small port is.  Dell publishes manuals on support.dell.com, complete with step-by-step guides for removing and replacing every component of the system if you ever need to do that.  USB-C won't necessarily be faster than USB-A, though.  Both USB-C and USB-A can support USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps) and USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10 Gbps).  On many systems, USB-C ports tend to support Gen 2 and USB-A ports tend to be limited to Gen 1, but there also examples of USB-C ports that only do Gen 1 and USB-A ports that do Gen 2.  Still, given that SATA itself tops out at 6 Gbps, I doubt the performance difference will be too significant.  Unless of course you get an external SSD that's actually NVMe internally, but those require Thunderbolt 3 rather than regular USB-C.

dbminter
dbminter
Expert
Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 560, Visits: 4.6K
Funny you should mention it, I just looked up the system documentation for what that small port on the front of my Dell XPS 8930 is.  It is a USB 3.1 Type-C port.  There's also a 2nd one in the back.


Ah, I was not aware that exFAT is not bootable.  I just checked the File Explorer Properties of my Cruzer and it is formatted as exFAT.  So, that probably explains why that particular 128 GB model is not a candidate in Reflect for creating Rescue Media.


With that new piece of information in mind, I checked the Properties of an S75 Lexar flash drive that I know boots and can be used for Rescue Media.  It is FAT32, hence why it must work.


So, with that in mind, I decided to perform an experiment.  The Cruzer was, currently, an empty flash drive so I decided to try formatting it as a FAT32 and see if Reflect would accept it then.  And that was when I discovered FAT32 wasn't an option for this drive.  Smile  But, NTFS was, which apparently can be booted, so I tried formatting it as NTFS.  Also, what I thought was a Cruzer may be an Ultra, as Reflect is returning it's a SanDiskUltra in the Rescue Media builder.  After a 2nd format, I guess to make it bootable, Reflect created Rescue Media on this same SanDisk which had failed to before earlier in the year.  I haven't tested booting it, but I've learned something, thanks!  Smile


From now on, when I get new flash drives that aren't being accepted by Reflect for Rescue Media, I'll check to see if they're formatted as exFAT, since it does seem to be the default for some flash drives.  It appears to be the default for flash drives according to File Explorer's Format properties.  I can then try formatting them as NTFS.  I've only ever had to change the file system of one flash drive before because it didn't accept files greater than 4 GB and I had to format it as NTFS to store some Reflect backups.  Or maybe it was the long file names I needed NTFS for, I forget.  One of the two reasons.


Actually, the above is not a solution at all!  It creates Rescue Media but formats the entire 128 GB drive as only 0.99 GB.  While that solves the booting problem, it relatively destroys the usefulness of the drive for anything beyond booting as a Rescue Media.  How can I get this flash drive back to 128 GB?  With DiskPart?  File Explorer's Format options are limited to 1.00 GB now for this drive.  I'm not entirely familiar, well, I'm unfamiliar, with DiskPart, but it seems to be the only thing I can think of that might work.  I tried NIBUI Partition Editor but all that's available to that is to format the 0.99 GB partition as 0.99 GB and no other options or functions available.


Never mind.  I figured it out.  I remembered there was a Macrium KB about DiskPart for preparing WinPE sticks.  So, I loaded it and adapted the instructions in it as I needed and got it formatted back to 128 GB.  A little knowledge is a dangerous thing!  Wink

Edited 6 December 2018 2:01 AM by dbminter
dbminter
dbminter
Expert
Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 560, Visits: 4.6K
I just ordered one of these and it's already shipped, I guess to try and make it delivered before Christmas, even though I chose free shipping.  Should arrive on the 19th.  Since you subscribed to this thread for that precise reason, JP, I'll let you know if I can use it for Rescue Media or not.

dbminter
dbminter
Expert
Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)Expert (751 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 560, Visits: 4.6K
jphughan - 5 December 2018 11:24 PM
Very odd.  I've never had an issue with those flash drives being recognized and used directly by the Rescue Media wizard, or any other brand of flash drive I've tried, for that matter -- as long as it's set up using MBR and either FAT32 and NTFS rather than GPT and/or exFAT.  Most flash drive seem to ship pre-formatted for exFAT these days since it's the only file system that's read/write on all reasonably recent OSes without any third-party tools AND supports files larger than 4GB (WinXP doesn't get to join the exFAT party).  The downside is that exFAT isn't bootable in either BIOS or UEFI mode.

The documentation of your system should tell you what your mysterious small port is.  Dell publishes manuals on support.dell.com, complete with step-by-step guides for removing and replacing every component of the system if you ever need to do that.  USB-C won't necessarily be faster than USB-A, though.  Both USB-C and USB-A can support USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps) and USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10 Gbps).  On many systems, USB-C ports tend to support Gen 2 and USB-A ports tend to be limited to Gen 1, but there also examples of USB-C ports that only do Gen 1 and USB-A ports that do Gen 2.  Still, given that SATA itself tops out at 6 Gbps, I doubt the performance difference will be too significant.  Unless of course you get an external SSD that's actually NVMe internally, but those require Thunderbolt 3 rather than regular USB-C.

Ah, I guess that's why adapters for USB 3.1 Type C to Type A work?

jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
Yeah, those adapters are literally just pin remaps because USB-C has all of the same pins you’d find in a USB-A port, in addition to other pins and (optionally) the capability to repurpose the USB 3.1 data pins to carry DisplayPort traffic instead.
Edited 19 December 2018 1:40 AM by jphughan
GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Similar Topics

Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search