Macrium Workstation Drive Order


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khiatt
khiatt
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On 99% of our Macrium installations, the "Source" SSD drive appears at the top of the list on the Create A Backup tab, and the "Destination" HDD drive appears underneath it...very consistent.

Lately we are having issues with the Destination HDD drive appearing at the top, and the Source SSD drive underneath; not a problem for us, but it is causing a lot of confusion for some users. ALL of the computers are wired exactly the same with regard to SATA ports. It appears to be an issue with how Macrium interacts with the Windows 7 O/S. Maybe Windows is assigning different device properties to SSD and HDD drives, which is causing them to swap orders?

Anyone seen this, or have any ideas on what might be happening?
jphughan
jphughan
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Reflect sorts the "Create a Backup" tab by disk number, and its disk numbers are based on disk numbering assigned by Windows, which you can view in Disk Management.  The only difference is that Reflect starts its numbering at 1, whereas Windows starts at 0, so all of Reflect's numbers will be offset relative to Windows, but the sequence should still match.  How are the destination HDD and source SSD listed in Disk Management?  If the destination HDD is listed above the source SSD, i.e. it has a lower number, then Reflect isn't doing anything odd itself.  In fact, I don't even think Windows is the culprit in your anomalous cases.  I just did some experimentation in a VM I happened to have that I thought would be useful for this situation.  In my VM, virtual IDE Controller #0, Location #0 has a virtual disk that contains a Windows 7 installation, and IDE Controller #0, Location #1 has a virtual disk that contains a Windows 10 installation.  When I boot into Windows 7 and check Disk Management, the Windows 7 disk appears as Disk 0 and the Windows 10 disk appears as Disk 1.  When I boot into Windows 10, I see the exact same numbering.  So if you've already made absolutely certain that the wiring on the affected 1% matches the other 99%, I don't have any immediate theories to account for the behavior, but it doesn't seem to be a Reflect issue, or even likely a Windows issue.

khiatt
khiatt
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jphughan - 5 December 2018 10:35 PM
Reflect sorts the "Create a Backup" tab by disk number, and its disk numbers are based on disk numbering assigned by Windows, which you can view in Disk Management.  The only difference is that Reflect starts its numbering at 1, whereas Windows starts at 0, so all of Reflect's numbers will be offset relative to Windows, but the sequence should still match.  How are the destination HDD and source SSD listed in Disk Management?  If the destination HDD is listed above the source SSD, i.e. it has a lower number, then Reflect isn't doing anything odd itself.  In fact, I don't even think Windows is the culprit in your anomalous cases.  I just did some experimentation in a VM I happened to have that I thought would be useful for this situation.  In my VM, virtual IDE Controller #0, Location #0 has a virtual disk that contains a Windows 7 installation, and IDE Controller #0, Location #1 has a virtual disk that contains a Windows 10 installation.  When I boot into Windows 7 and check Disk Management, the Windows 7 disk appears as Disk 0 and the Windows 10 disk appears as Disk 1.  When I boot into Windows 10, I see the exact same numbering.  So if you've already made absolutely certain that the wiring on the affected 1% matches the other 99%, I don't have any immediate theories to account for the behavior, but it doesn't seem to be a Reflect issue, or even likely a Windows issue.

The Windows Partition Manager and the diskpart DOS utility both report the RAID Array (C drive) as Disk 1, even though the drives are plugged into SATA ports 1 & 2 on the motherboard (there is no Port 0 on the motherboard). The backup drive is reported as Disk 0, even though it is plugged into SATA port 3. Windows evidently gets its drive order from the order in which the BIOS enumerates the ports, so it appears that the only way to fix this would be to change the BIOS enumeration order. You can change the boot order in a BIOS, but not the enumeration order, so I think we'll have to test other motherboard/BIOS combos or just work around this...
jphughan
jphughan
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Strange that the BIOS doesn't enumerate them in ascending order according to how the ports are labeled, but could you simply rearrange the cables to connect to different SATA ports, i.e. plug the backup disk into Port 1 and the RAID array disks into 2 and 3?  In most cases, the RAID controller will have no problem with the disks being moved around because the disks themselves are tagged with data so they can be tracked.  Alternatively, you might have to go into the RAID management interface where you'll see a "foreign array" listed that you'd have to import, but that should be it.  Would be a lot easier than messing around with different motherboard and BIOS revisions

khiatt
khiatt
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jphughan - 5 December 2018 11:06 PM
Strange that the BIOS doesn't enumerate them in ascending order according to how the ports are labeled, but could you simply rearrange the cables to connect to different SATA ports, i.e. plug the backup disk into Port 1 and the RAID array disks into 2 and 3?  In most cases, the RAID controller will have no problem with the disks being moved around because the disks themselves are tagged with data so they can be tracked.  Alternatively, you might have to go into the RAID management interface where you'll see a "foreign array" listed that you'd have to import, but that should be it.  Would be a lot easier than messing around with different motherboard and BIOS revisions

We could connect to whichever port would enumerate correctly, but then the Intel RST RAID software would list the RAID and backup drives in the wrong order. We're trying to keep the configuration as standardized and consistent as possible, because the servers are installed on ships with little or no IT support on board, and our techs may get a 3 AM call to login to the server remotely. We've had no trouble maintaining consistency until we had to move to a newer ASUS motherboard.
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