Keeping Existing Backups before new PC Build


Author
Message
Wanderer189
Wanderer189
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 10
I am about to build a new system. My current system is a dual boot with Win7 and Win 10. I am using a 4TB HDD that is partitioned into 6 partitions. I am doing away with Win7 and all the partitions but 1-2, one for Win10 and maybe one for data (will be using optane with this drive in new build). All my backups are wrote to a 2TB external HDD. Currently there are 15 backup files totaling 1.5tb.

I am backing up like this:
Full Backup every month
Differential every week
Incremental daily (everyday)

1. I want to move these to a folder elsewhere or a 1TB external drive, in case I need them to use to do a full restore if something goes wrong with me re-doing the HDD for new build or if I forgot something before deleting the partitions I am doing away with. Can I delete some of them or do I have to keep them all?

jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
You can delete some of them, but you’ll have to be careful not to break any chains. The best way to do the deletions world be through Reflect, because if you select any given backup for deletion, it will also automatically select any “child” backups for deletion that would have been rendered useless by your original selection. This gives you a chance to see the scope of your deletion before committing and also avoids leaving useless backups on your disk taking up space. It’s also the only way to delete backups while Macrium Image Guardian is enabled. To do this, open Reflect, go to the Restore tab, and make sure the folder containing your backups is listed in the “Folders to search” list (click the link with that name at the top). Then for any backup you might want to delete, click Other Actions > Delete.

FYI though you may not be able to boot Windows 10 if you restore only its OS partition. You might need the Recovery partition and/or something else, especially considering you have a dual boot setup. And if your new PC supports UEFI booting, you might want to perform a customized restore setup that will allow your restored Windows 10 environment to boot in UEFI mode on the new PC.
Edited 14 November 2018 2:37 PM by jphughan
Wanderer189
Wanderer189
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 10
jphughan - 14 November 2018 2:35 PM
You can delete some of them, but you’ll have to be careful not to break any chains. The best way to do the deletions world be through Reflect, because if you select any given backup for deletion, it will also automatically select any “child” backups for deletion that would have been rendered useless by your original selection. This gives you a chance to see the scope of your deletion before committing and also avoids leaving useless backups on your disk taking up space. It’s also the only way to delete backups while Macrium Image Guardian is enabled. To do this, open Reflect, go to the Restore tab, and make sure the folder containing your backups is listed in the “Folders to search” list (click the link with that name at the top). Then for any backup you might want to delete, click Other Actions > Delete.

FYI though you may not be able to boot Windows 10 if you restore only its OS partition. You might need the Recovery partition and/or something else, especially considering you have a dual boot setup. And if your new PC supports UEFI booting, you might want to perform a customized restore setup that will allow your restored Windows 10 environment to boot in UEFI mode on the new PC.

Thank you for the reply. I think I am just going to keep all the existing backups on the drive they are on for now.

I am still moving data around and removing partitions. Once I get all that done, I was going to create a new backup of the old system with everything working without the dual boot and less partitions to a different external HDD. I hope to use that backup to migrate it to the new build that will be using the same HDD for booting. If all that goes well and I get all that up and running on new build, I will back that up as well.

Then I will then install the optane and if that goes well, will start out with a fresh new backup of new system. I just want to make sure if something goes wrong with anything, I can at least put everything back like before I started with the PC that I am currently using. If you have any more suggestions, sure love to hear them...
jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
It sounds like you'll already have this, but make sure you have a backup of your system from immediately BEFORE you start deleting partitions.  But if after that you manage to keep your existing system working even after deleting all of the partitions you no longer want, then yes I would expect that would migrate over to the new PC just fine, as long as you run ReDeploy after performing the restore on that system.  But again if your new system supports UEFI and your existing system is Legacy BIOS, you may also want to consider restoring in a way that will allow your new system to boot your restored Windows 10 environment in UEFI mode.  Macrium has a KB article for this purpose here.

Wanderer189
Wanderer189
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 10
jphughan - 14 November 2018 3:35 PM
It sounds like you'll already have this, but make sure you have a backup of your system from immediately BEFORE you start deleting partitions.  But if after that you manage to keep your existing system working even after deleting all of the partitions you no longer want, then yes I would expect that would migrate over to the new PC just fine, as long as you run ReDeploy after performing the restore on that system.  But again if your new system supports UEFI and your existing system is Legacy BIOS, you may also want to consider restoring in a way that will allow your new system to boot your restored Windows 10 environment in UEFI mode.  Macrium has a KB article for this purpose here.

Had already done as you suggested with backup immediately before deleting partitions, so good there. Current system is using UEFI so it should be good there as well. Always get nervous and like to make sure I am not missing things when doing something like this.

Things so far are going well, my biggest worry is the ReDeploy working enough to get it booted up. I am going from old Dell optiplex 7010 with HDD's and GPU sticking out of it, it's using 3470 CPU, DDR3 ram, 1050ti GPU, to my new build that has z390 motherboard, DDR4 ram, i8086k CPU, 1080ti GPU, etc. 

Do you see anything that I might watch for as far as the ReDeploy with the difference in CPU or RAM, board architecture, etc.?
jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (5.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 4K, Visits: 29K
Wow, it's pretty unusual to see a Windows 7 system using UEFI since Windows 7 doesn't fully support UEFI; you have to keep Legacy capabilities enabled even if you set it up on a GPT disk.  But if you are in fact running a UEFI system, i.e. your Windows disk uses GPT rather than MBR, then you'll need to keep the EFI and MSR partitions in addition to the Windows 10 partition, so that's at least 3.  And then default Windows installations include a Recovery partition, but if you have a dual boot system where Windows 7 came first, I don't think Windows 10 adds its own Recovery partition.

My guess is that ReDeploy will get your new system to boot and won't even need you to supply any boot-critical drivers manually during its routine, and then you'll simply need to install the appropriate drivers for your new system within Windows afterward.  Good luck!

Edited 14 November 2018 4:05 PM by jphughan
GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Similar Topics

Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search