Redploy while the driver INF disk coontains a setup.exe


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Dave5358
Dave5358
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Hi,
I planning to try to transfer a W7 system on a new ASRock Z390 Extreme 4 mobo with an I9 processor that Microsoft never wants to be used with Windows 7 using redeploy.
The main problem I see is that the cd containing the INF drivers uses a setup.exe file rather than separate driver files in a driver sub directory.
Can redeploy deal with this kind of drivers to inject?
Alternatively, could I make a simple raw W10 install, and somehow copy the installed drivers? From what sub directory? And then put this drivers on a CD (or an USB key preferably) to be used by redeploy.
I'm prepared to spend some time and effort to avoid using W10 as along as possible.

jphughan
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ReDeploy needs a "standard" driver file set that includes an INF file.  There's a decent chance the Setup.exe file wouldn't even run in the Windows PE environment that the Rescue Media uses.  Your best bet (of unlikely prospects given your hardware predicament) is to see if the Setup.exe file includes any parameters that will allow it to run in a way that simply extracts the driver package.  Otherwise, sometimes you can launch it and let it sit there at the EULA or whatever, then browse through your Temp folder to find the extracted files.  Last resort would be something along the lines you suggested of actually installing the driver somewhere and then extracting the file set.  I use a utility called Double Driver to do that.  But honestly even if you get the files you need, I really wouldn't bank on having a good experience.  You might find that the drivers don't install on Windows 7, or don't work properly, or you're still missing some drivers -- or you might sort out all the drivers and still find that Windows Update refuses to provide updates for your system because of its unsupported hardware.  If you wanted to stay on Windows 7 as long as possible, your far better bet would have been to get an Intel Core 6th Gen CPU that's actually supported.  But even if you sidestep ALL of that, in case you're not aware, Microsoft will stop providing security updates for Windows 7 in just over a year (January 2020), and if XP is any indication, browser vendors and anti-virus vendors (including Microsoft if you're just using Defender) will stop providing updates shortly thereafter, at which point Windows 7 will arguably be unsafe to use on the Internet.

Edited 4 November 2018 5:03 AM by jphughan
Mustang
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Dave I don't think you're going to have much luck. I went to the ASRock website and looked at the drivers available for your Z390 Extreme4 board. They only list Windows 10 64 bit drivers. When I clicked on the OS box and selected "All", no other drivers showed up. Windows 10 drivers usually don't work in Windows 7. Having said that, the driver you would need (if Windows 7 drivers were available) is listed as SATA Floppy image. That gives you the SATA controller driver in inf format. That would be the only driver you would need to add with ReDeploy to get the OS to boot. Seriously, I think you're looking at upgrading to Windows 10 64 bit with a fresh install and reinstalling all your software with that hardware. You can always use a Macrium image of your Windows 7 system to transfer over all your data files.

If you already have the motherboard, take a look at the support DVD and see if you can find a make floppy option. If you do find it, look at the folder structure and see if by any chance there is a Win7 folder. That should be the SATA controller driver you need to add with ReDeploy.
Dave5358
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Thanks for these very comprehensive and fast answers.
I guess what W7 days are numbered, which is a shame considering the horrible mess W10 is.
But Double Driver after a dummy install looks like it's worth at least a try. Gen 6 procs are way below in terms of performance compared to the last 8-core I9, I would have no use in upgrading my current  6-core I7. I"ll try the floppy method too, thanks.
I'm not too concerned about security yet. I'm sure that Malwarebytes for example will take time to drop W7 (too many customers), and I use Waterfox also dedicated to maintain legacy stuff. And I apply MIcrosoft upgrades only once a year, they have a tendency to break things, and I have never been infected in 20 years!

Mustang
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Here's a link to an older version of the Intel IRST driver from Intel's website that supports Windows 7:
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/22271/Intel-Rapid-Storage-Technology-AHCI-for-Windows-7-8-on-Intel-Desktop-Boards
Choose one of the floppy choices (x86 or x64) based on your Windows 7 system. Using that driver with ReDeploy should get Windows 7 to boot. After you get it booting, you'll need to find all the other drivers that Device Manager complains about. They will need to be Windows 7 versions. You'll need to find them from the OEM's of the components as ASRock won't be of any help. Good luck.
Also, you'll need to set the SATA mode in your BIOS to AHCI even if your old computer was not set that way. And, I hope your Windows 7 system is 64 bit. If it's 32 bit you're in an even deeper hole. The built-in video on the new motherboard will not work in 32 bit systems. You'll need to add a video card to make 32 bit work.

Edited 4 November 2018 6:38 PM by Mustang
Dave5358
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I tested a the Asrock INF SetupChipset.exe on a W7 virtual machine,and it does run without complaining it's not W10, so I will try it first in the Reflect Windows PE environment. As soon as all the hardware is on Amazon, so that I can return it if it does not work at all...
Is there a tutorial about how to do that, or is it as simple as pointing it on an USB key or a cdrom?
Thanks!

jphughan
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Dave5358 - 4 November 2018 6:43 PM
I tested a the Asrock INF SetupChipset.exe on a W7 virtual machine,and it does run without complaining it's not W10, so I will try it first in the Reflect Windows PE environment. As soon as all the hardware is on Amazon, so that I can return it if it does not work at all...
Is there a tutorial about how to do that, or is it as simple as pointing it on an USB key or a cdrom?
Thanks!

If you want to try to run an application in WinPE, your best bet is to either use Command Prompt or browse to it using the PE Explorer application -- and yes it can be stored on a flash drive, disc, whatever.  Both of those applicationsare available in the taskbar in the Rescue environment.  But WinPE is a much more restrictive environment than any "regular" Windows OS.  The vast majority of Windows applications do not launch under WinPE, and an installer would be even less likely to operate in any useful way, if it does at all.

Edited 4 November 2018 6:52 PM by jphughan
Dave5358
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Thanks for the IRST link, and yes, I'm using W7 64 bit fortunately.

jphughan
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In case this wasn't obvious, you don't have to load ALL of the drivers for your new hardware using ReDeploy. That wizard is only meant to get your system booting, and the expectation is that you'd install any additional drivers within real Windows once it starts. ReDeploy might not even ask for your chipset drivers to do its thing if it decides that they're not essential for getting the system to boot. So if you haven't already tried ReDeploying, give it a shot. You might get lucky.  The Intel RST driver should only be required if your new motherboard is set to "Intel Rapid Storage/RAID/RST" mode rather than AHCI mode. Note however that if you'll be using an NVMe SSD, you'll need to set it into that RAID/RST mode, because Windows 7 does not natively support NVMe, so it can't use AHCI mode with an NVMe SSD.

Edited 4 November 2018 6:54 PM by jphughan
Dave5358
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I'll stick to standard SSDs for my tests, thanks for the reminder.

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