viBoot gives Out of Memory Error


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Goldenbarstewart
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viBoot continues to give out of memory error when attempting to create a virtual machine from a img file- I increased the memory from the default 2 GB to the maximum 6 GB - makes no difference. I am using MS Hyper-v - Windows 10 Pro x64. I have assigned all the cores and set the virtual HDD to 500GB.

The image file contains all the partitions on the windows 8.1 drive imaged.
jphughan
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Any chance the out of memory error refers to the HOST running out of memory to run the VM rather than the guest running out of memory to run itself? In that case, increasing the memory allocation on the guest would be counterproductive.
Goldenbarstewart
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jphughan - 6 August 2018 4:27 PM
Any chance the out of memory error refers to the HOST running out of memory to run the VM rather than the guest running out of memory to run itself? In that case, increasing the memory allocation on the guest would be counterproductive.

thanks - my computer has 8 GB RAM and no other programs are running other than viBoot and Hyper-v so it is unlikely, I would think, that the computer is running out of memory.
jphughan
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Have you gone to Task Manager > Performance tab > Memory to see how much memory is in use before you start the VM? Click More Details in the lower left of Task Manager if you’re not already seeing a multi-tab view. If your system only has 8GB of RAM, you may not be able to run a VM with more than 3-4 GB allocated. You could also try enabling Dynamic Memory for the VM and setting its startup memory to something low, like 1GB.
Edited 6 August 2018 5:25 PM by jphughan
Goldenbarstewart
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jphughan - 6 August 2018 5:23 PM
Have you gone to Task Manager > Performance tab > Memory to see how much memory is in use before you start the VM? Click More Details in the lower left of Task Manager if you’re not already seeing a multi-tab view. If your system only has 8GB of RAM, you may not be able to run a VM with more than 3-4 GB allocated. You could also try enabling Dynamic Memory for the VM and setting its startup memory to something low, like 1GB.

Yes - you identified the problem - it is/was the HOST memory that was the issue.  I added 4 GB additional RAM to the MB to bring the total to 12 GB and was able to start the VM from the Restore Tab of Reflect.

Your speedy and knowledgeable help is greatly appreciated.
Goldenbarstewart
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Another question - as I am new to VM, I notice that the VM is not connected to the internet, even though the HOST is - can VMs connect to the 'net?  And if so, how?
jphughan
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You need to add a virtual network adapter to the VM and connect that adapter to a virtual switch. That should have been presented as an option in the viBoot wizard when you first created the VM, but if you’ve already got the VM created, you’ll have to do it from Hyper-V Manager, or else recreate the VM from scratch in viBoot. If your host is on a sufficiently new release of Windows 10 (I think 1709 or newer), you’ll have a “Default switch” you can attach the guest’s virtual NIC to. That’s a special switch where the host basically acts as a router between any VMs attached to it and the “real” network that the host is attached to. The host assigns IPs to guest VMs via DHCP and routes any traffic bound for the real network out through whatever physical interface the host is using for Internet access at any given time. If you need your VMs to be directly on the “real” network, meaning they need to have an IP on the real network’s subnet rather than being behind a router, then you’ll need to create a new virtual switch in Hyper-V Manager as an “external network” and have it connect out through the appropriate host NIC. However, that can create some additional complications if you connect to your real network via Wi-Fi rather than wired Ethernet or if you switch between different network interfaces for Internet connectivity on the host, and it’s also typically unnecessary unless you’re trying to host services inside the VM for other devices on the real network, so try the “Default switch” option first.
Edited 6 August 2018 8:45 PM by jphughan
Goldenbarstewart
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jphughan - 6 August 2018 8:36 PM
You need to add a virtual network adapter to the VM and connect that adapter to a virtual switch. That should have been presented as an option in the viBoot wizard when you first created the VM, but if you’ve already got the VM created, you’ll have to do it from Hyper-V Manager, or else recreate the VM from scratch in viBoot. If your host is on a sufficiently new release of Windows 10 (I think 1709 or newer), you’ll have a “Default switch” you can attach the guest’s virtual NIC to. That’s a special switch where the host basically acts as a router between any VMs attached to it and the “real” network that the host is attached to. The host assigns IPs to guest VMs via DHCP and routes any traffic bound for the real network out through whatever physical interface the host is using for Internet access at any given time. If you need your VMs to be directly on the “real” network, meaning they need to have an IP on the real network’s subnet rather than being behind a router, then you’ll need to create a new virtual switch in Hyper-V Manager as an “external network” and have it connect out through the appropriate host NIC. However, that can create some additional complications if you connect to your real network via Wi-Fi rather than wired Ethernet or if you switch between different network interfaces for Internet connectivity on the host, and it’s also typically unnecessary unless you’re trying to host services inside the VM for other devices on the real network, so try the “Default switch” option first.

Thank you so much - I set the default switch as advised and was able to connect the VM to the internet.

Another question:  I notice that I am unable to copy/transfer files from the VM to the HOST.  Is it possible to do that?
jphughan
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Yes it is. If the guest is running Windows 8 or newer, switch to Enhanced Session Mode in the Virtual Machine Connection window, and then you can use the copy/paste keyboard shortcuts to copy data between the guest and host in either direction. If you’re running an older version of Windows, you’ll need to set up file sharing and networking between the guest and host just as if the guest was a totally separate system on your network. FYI viBoot is just a mechanism to allow Hyper-V to use Reflect image files as virtual hard drives and also make changes to allow an image to boot as a VM. After that initial setup is complete, it works just like any other Hyper-V VM, so if you’re new to virtualization you may want to look into how to use Hyper-V, because anything you learn there would apply to these viBoot scenarios.
Goldenbarstewart
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jphughan - 6 August 2018 11:48 PM
Yes it is. If the guest is running Windows 8 or newer, switch to Enhanced Session Mode in the Virtual Machine Connection window, and then you can use the copy/paste keyboard shortcuts to copy data between the guest and host in either direction. If you’re running an older version of Windows, you’ll need to set up file sharing and networking between the guest and host just as if the guest was a totally separate system on your network. FYI viBoot is just a mechanism to allow Hyper-V to use Reflect image files as virtual hard drives and also make changes to allow an image to boot as a VM. After that initial setup is complete, it works just like any other Hyper-V VM, so if you’re new to virtualization you may want to look into how to use Hyper-V, because anything you learn there would apply to these viBoot scenarios.

Again, thanks.  I entered Enhanced Session mode but still cannot copy/paste between the HOST and the VM.  I looked into how to use Hyper-V and there is a direction to "Open VMConnect' in order to be able to choose what processes on the HOST one wishes to utilize on the VM.  However, I cannot find VMConnect anywhere in order to open it.
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