Dual Boot - Windows and Linux ?


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Don90630
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I would like to create use a new hard drive to create a dual boot for Windows 10 and Linux.
If I first create the partitions using a Linux distribution, can I then use my Windows 10 Macrium Rescue Media and backups to restore to the Windows Partition?

jphughan
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Linux is typically "nicer" about setting up dual boot than Windows, so you may actually find it easier to install Windows 10 first and then install Linux, since in that case Linux will detect the Windows partition and ask if you want to set it up for dual boot.  That said, Windows 10 is probably going to create an ongoing problem.  Microsoft intends to release new Windows 10 builds every March and September going forward, and with each of those, there's a decent chance that the update will break your dual boot setup -- so be prepared for some aggravation there.  But either way, whenever you get your desired arrangement, Reflect actually supports capturing images of both Windows and Linux partitions even though Reflect itself doesn't run within Linux.  As for restoring, I can't comment on that since I don't run a Windows/Linux dual boot setup, so hopefully someone else more experienced there will be able to chime in, but I would imagine it should work just fine.  Note that if your system uses UEFI booting, the bootloader will be located on the EFI/System partition (usually about 100 MB), so if you encounter boot problems when restoring just your Windows/Linux partition, restoring that partition may help.  Lastly, I don't know if the "Fix Boot Problems" feature within the Rescue environment will be able to handle dual boot setups since again I've never tested it

Don90630
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jphughan - 6 May 2018 8:00 PM
Linux is typically "nicer" about setting up dual boot than Windows, so you may actually find it easier to install Windows 10 first and then install Linux, since in that case Linux will detect the Windows partition and ask if you want to set it up for dual boot.  That said, Windows 10 is probably going to create an ongoing problem.  Microsoft intends to release new Windows 10 builds every March and September going forward, and with each of those, there's a decent chance that the update will break your dual boot setup -- so be prepared for some aggravation there.  But either way, whenever you get your desired arrangement, Reflect actually supports capturing images of both Windows and Linux partitions even though Reflect itself doesn't run within Linux.  As for restoring, I can't comment on that since I don't run a Windows/Linux dual boot setup, so hopefully someone else more experienced there will be able to chime in, but I would imagine it should work just fine.  Note that if your system uses UEFI booting, the bootloader will be located on the EFI/System partition (usually about 100 MB), so if you encounter boot problems when restoring just your Windows/Linux partition, restoring that partition may help.  Lastly, I don't know if the "Fix Boot Problems" feature within the Rescue environment will be able to handle dual boot setups since again I've never tested it

Thank you. Since I have a stable Windows 10 on my working drive, I will go ahead and try the dual boot on my new drive. Windows 10 is rolling out yet another build - #1803. So I will soon find out how the new build co-operates with my dual boot with LInux and Windows 10 build #1709. The time I spend might not be worth the effort. It might be some time before I get to it, but I post the results here.
Don

jphughan
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Good luck! Fortunately since you have Reflect, if the dual boot attempt goes south, then rollback should be simple. Smile And for what it’s worth, the dual boot wizard I referred to above was in Ubuntu, which I tested in a VM. I can’t speak to how easy other distros make it.
Don90630
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Don90630 - 6 May 2018 11:03 PM
jphughan - 6 May 2018 8:00 PM
Linux is typically "nicer" about setting up dual boot than Windows, so you may actually find it easier to install Windows 10 first and then install Linux, since in that case Linux will detect the Windows partition and ask if you want to set it up for dual boot.  That said, Windows 10 is probably going to create an ongoing problem.  Microsoft intends to release new Windows 10 builds every March and September going forward, and with each of those, there's a decent chance that the update will break your dual boot setup -- so be prepared for some aggravation there.  But either way, whenever you get your desired arrangement, Reflect actually supports capturing images of both Windows and Linux partitions even though Reflect itself doesn't run within Linux.  As for restoring, I can't comment on that since I don't run a Windows/Linux dual boot setup, so hopefully someone else more experienced there will be able to chime in, but I would imagine it should work just fine.  Note that if your system uses UEFI booting, the bootloader will be located on the EFI/System partition (usually about 100 MB), so if you encounter boot problems when restoring just your Windows/Linux partition, restoring that partition may help.  Lastly, I don't know if the "Fix Boot Problems" feature within the Rescue environment will be able to handle dual boot setups since again I've never tested it

Thank you. Since I have a stable Windows 10 on my working drive, I will go ahead and try the dual boot on my new drive. Windows 10 is rolling out yet another build - #1803. So I will soon find out how the new build co-operates with my dual boot with LInux and Windows 10 build #1709. The time I spend might not be worth the effort. It might be some time before I get to it, but I post the results here.
Don

I was able to dual-boot Windows 10 build 1803 and Solus-3. I installed Windows 10 using the entire drive. The installation of Solus did the partition reduction and the dual boot. After a few weeks of testing and another Windows update, I will report back.
Hendrick99
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Concerning dual-boot restore: This works great and very fast. I've been using this for a couple of years already.
When restoring the entire Windows partition, you must do this stand-alone by booting from a rescue USB stick
or a rescue CD or DVD.
However, restoring the Linux partition normally can be done via a live Windows system.

Good luck!
Don90630
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Thanks to all your responses. I will save them for future reference. Hopefully, I will not have the occasion to restore my entire system! But it's great to know we have a safety net backup system in place.

GO

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