Cloning to GPT- proper structure?


Author
Message
Justin42
Justin42
New Member
New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5, Visits: 14
I've been trying to figure out the proper terminology to search about this and haven't had much luck, sorry if this is a silly question.
I have a 2TB HD set up as a dynamic drive in my system that I am trying to move to a 4TB drive. (doesn't need to be dynamic) I initially formatted/initialized the drive in Windows 10 (64bit) to have it show up and make sure the drive was working. Windows set it up as a small initial partition and then the 4TB partition-- my understanding is this is how GPT works (using that initial partition to hold the drive partitioning info).

Then I used Reflect to clone the drive. I misunderstood the process a bit and deleted that small initial GPT partition, and told it to clone the data. I expected it would rebuild the GPT partition based on the cloned partition (expanded to 4TB) but when I check there is only the 4TB data partition, nothing else. Reflect did exactly what I asked it to, but my question is is this a valid partition structure? It is seen properly in Windows, but I know from experience this could be the kind of thing that 2-3 years down the line might be seen as "non-standard" by some other utility and choke, leaving me to re-do it at that point.

If it's valid to have a GPT drive without that initial partion (since it only will ever have 1 partition), that's cool, otherwise I am thinking I should re-do the clone now instead of waiting to see what happens. Would the proper steps be to format/initialize the drive, delete the data partition, leave the initial GPT partition, and then just clone the data (expanding it to take up the full space)?

Thanks!
Edited 14 February 2018 10:57 PM by Justin42
jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3.4K, Visits: 25K
Just to clarify, the 2TB drive is not home to an OS partition, correct?  It's just used for data?  If so, then yes it's normal for a disk using the GPT layout to have a small reserved partition at the front, and that definitely should be there.  The exception is for disks that hold a Windows OS, in which case there's an MSR partition placed later in the partition sequence that serves the same purpose.

The dynamic disk as the source is the twist.  Basic disks are much less of a headache for a lot of reasons, so I recommend using dynamic disks only if you absolutely need them.  If you don't, then it should be possible to keep your 4TB disk as a basic disk.  I'll see if I can test this to confirm and report back with a step-by-step.

EDIT: See next post for solution

Edited 15 February 2018 12:27 AM by jphughan
jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3.4K, Visits: 25K
Well I wasn't able to test your scenario because apparently dynamic disks are not allowed on "portable computers", and I use a laptop.  They may also not be allowed on VHDX-hosted disks as I had hoped to test with, and I don't have a VM handy right at the moment.  However, this KB article, while not your exact use case, gives some insight.  It covers how to restore an image of a dynamic disk, and the steps explain that partitions from dynamic disks can be restored to a basic disk, which means they can also be cloned to a basic disk -- but when doing so, you have to drag the individual source partitions down to the target .  So in your case, I would use the "clean" command in Diskpart to wipe your new 4TB disk, then initialize it as GPT and create a new partition on it, which will also automatically create the small initial partition.  Then go into Reflect and start the clone wizard.  At the first step, rather than just selecting the entire disk, drag your source partition(s) down to the destination, making sure to leave that initial small partition alone.  Based on the KB article, the clone should run, and your 4TB disk should remain a basic disk.

Edited 15 February 2018 12:28 AM by jphughan
Justin42
Justin42
New Member
New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)New Member (7 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5, Visits: 14
Thank you so much for your help and going through all of this! The source drive is actually the remaining drive from a software RAID array (the other drive failed) and I've found software RAID to be a bit touchy for my liking, so I'm just going back to basic disks for now (and heavy backups with Reflect!). And yes, this drive is just used for data, no OS or anything installed on it.

I'll try it again tonight and hopefully not destroy the initial partition this time. Thank you again!
GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Similar Topics

Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search