Rescue Media error message


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harrymacrium
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I have a licensed copy of Reflect Home Edition (64 bit) v6.3.1849 on a Windows 7 Pro (64 bit) SP1 computer.
Today I installed a utility that created all kinds of havoc with my system. It took Safe Mode to be able to remove the utility, and even then Windows clearly was not functioning correctly. Due to luck, I had done an Image backup of everything on my C: drive (an SS drive) last night.

Since Reflect is installed on C: (along with my OS, programs and most of my data), I had to reboot from my Rescue CD. Thankfully everything seemed to go just fine, and so far I have not found any problems after I rebooted my computer.

The Restore operation seemed to work OK. But just before it closed, there was a popup window that said something like 'Reflex has discovered a technical problem that needs to be reported to Macrium. Please send us the following file'. And then a file name was listed, which consisted of a series of letters and numbers. But since Windows had not yet rebooted, there was no way I could get an image of the message, so I have no more details than this.

So my 1st question is, where on my computer would I look for such a message or messages? Since I know the date and time I did the Image Restore, I should be able to find it if I know where to look.

Then the 2nd question is, assuming I do find it, where do I send it?

And finally, since I have all of my Operating System, Programs & most data on C;, if this problem occurs again, I will have to again use the Rescue Media. Can I install Reflect on either my D: drive, or on a USB stick, so that the Rescue Media is not required in the future?

Harry

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Hey Harry,

For future reference, if a file name is referenced, there’s a File Explorer application you can launch from the taskbar in the Rescue environment that will allow you to browse to the file location and optionally copy it to a flash drive, for example. In terms of capturing an image of the error, maybe next time take a picture of your display with a smartphone or something? There are also screenshot utilities that will run in Windows PE (which is what the Rescue environment uses), but that’s a bit more work.

Installing Reflect on another drive won’t affect how the Rescue environment works. There is a “boot menu recovery option” you can enable that allows you to boot into the Rescue environment using files stored on your hard drive rather than needing a disc or USB flash drive (assuming the hard drive is intact, which is why it should be considered an additional convenience rather than a substitute for disc/USB Rescue Media), but that uses the exact same files that Reflect uses when creating disc/USB Rescue Media, so it would be unlikely to affect whether you see an error, unless maybe there was a problem loading the files from the disc/flash drive in the first place. Still, you definitely do not want to forego having disc/USB Rescue Media at all. Rescue Media is expressly intended to handle scenarios exactly like the one you encountered.

The only way to install full Reflect itself onto a flash drive would be to have a Technicians License, but that’s quite expensive because of the use cases it is intended to support, and again it wouldn’t affect Rescue environment behavior. However, you could certainly create a Rescue Media USB flash drive rather than a disc if you’d like.

In terms of solving the actual problem, hopefully Macrium staff will be along shortly to suggest where you might find the file in question and where to send it. In the meantime, you might try checking the root of your C drive or the root of the flash drive.
Edited 26 January 2018 2:08 AM by jphughan
harrymacrium
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jphughan - 26 January 2018 1:56 AM
Hey Harry,

For future reference, if a file name is referenced, there’s a File Explorer application you can launch from the taskbar in the Rescue environment that will allow you to browse to the file location and optionally copy it to a flash drive, for example. In terms of capturing an image of the error, maybe next time take a picture of your display with a smartphone or something? There are also screenshot utilities that will run in Windows PE (which is what the Rescue environment uses), but that’s a bit more work.

Installing Reflect on another drive won’t affect how the Rescue environment works. There is a “boot menu recovery option” you can enable that allows you to boot into the Rescue environment using files stored on your hard drive rather than needing a disc or USB flash drive (assuming the hard drive is intact, which is why it should be considered an additional convenience rather than a substitute for disc/USB Rescue Media), but that uses the exact same files that Reflect uses when creating disc/USB Rescue Media, so it would be unlikely to affect whether you see an error, unless maybe there was a problem loading the files from the disc/flash drive in the first place. Still, you definitely do not want to forego having disc/USB Rescue Media at all. Rescue Media is expressly intended to handle scenarios exactly like the one you encountered.

The only way to install full Reflect itself onto a flash drive would be to have a Technicians License, but that’s quite expensive because of the use cases it is intended to support, and again it wouldn’t affect Rescue environment behavior. However, you could certainly create a Rescue Media USB flash drive rather than a disc if you’d like.

In terms of solving the actual problem, hopefully Macrium staff will be along shortly to suggest where you might find the file in question and where to send it. In the meantime, you might try checking the root of your C drive or the root of the flash drive.

jp:

Thanks for the prompt reply. I never knew about a File Explorer application. I'll search for it. I do have a camera right here on my desk, and I have taken screen shots in the past with it, but I was so frustrated at the time, I didn't think to use it.

Thanks for the tip on the 'boot memory recovery option'. I just created it. I read the Reflex Instructions, but they didn't say much. I assume that this option appears as one of the Boot Options when I start in Safe Mode. The way things have gone today, I did not want to try it <g>.

I found this file in C:.  reflectv6.1-1023-x64-15.dmp. It has about the right time today when I ran the Rescue CD. I have a utility called Blue Screen View which opened the .dmp file, but there was nothing there I understood. As you said, perhaps the Macrium techs will know if that might be the correct file.

Harry

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Happy to help! The File Explorer icon is just in the lower-left corner next to the shutdown and Commamd Prompt buttons.

Unless you had another Reflect crash recently, that DMP file is definitely what you want. I got one while working on something else within Reflect recently. You can probably email it to support at macrium dot com and include a link to this thread since you’ve already described the circumstances just before the issue here.

The boot menu option can actually give you a choice between Windows and the Rescue environment on EVERY boot if you want. After you enable it, you can use the Windows tool called “msconfig” to customize how long the boot menu is presented before it boots into Windows by default or specify that the menu should not be shown at all during general boots and instead only as part of the Safe Mode and other “Advanced Startup” options.
Edited 26 January 2018 1:03 PM by jphughan
harrymacrium
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jphughan - 26 January 2018 12:25 PM
Happy to help! The File Explorer icon is just in the lower-left corner next to the shutdown and Commamd Prompt buttons.

Unless you had another Reflect crash recently, that DMP file is definitely what you want. I got one while working on something else within Reflect recently. You can probably email it to support at macrium dot com and include a link to this thread since you’ve already described the circumstances just before the issue here.

The boot menu option can actually give you a choice between Windows and the Rescue environment on EVERY boot if you want. After you enable it, you can use the Windows tool called “msconfig” to customize how long the boot menu is presented before it boots into Windows by default or specify that the menu should not be shown at all during general boots and instead only as part of the Safe Mode and other “Advanced Startup” options.

jp:

Thanks for the additional info. I have Win 7, so still called Windows Explorer, but I know where the icon is.

I will mail the DMPfile to support as you suggested and reference this thread.

I like your suggestion of modifying the boot option to only show the menu as part of Safe Mode. But I can only find the 'Timeout' setting. I have attached what my 'msconfig' menu looks like.

But I had a very strange occurrence today. I thought I would see where Macrum placed the System Recovery File you showed me how to create. So when I got ready to boot today, I selected F12. That got me the screen shown in F12BootMenuE, attached. I had no idea what most of these were, so I selected ESC (underlined in red). That opened what I named UnknownBootMenuE, also attached. Here I chose 'Start Windows Normally.

Unfortunately, what opened was the 'defective'  Windows that started the whole thread!!! So then I rebooted choosing F8. The screen I got was F8BootMenuE, also attached. This screen now shows the Reflect System Recovery option, which is what I selected (underlined in red). Then that opened the same Reflex recovery that I had gotten previously with my CD. This time it all went well, and no error message.

But when I now shut down my computer, and reboot, I am back to the 'defective' Windows again! And this time I cannot access what I noted above as FxBootMenuE. I have to reboot from the CD. But no error message.

Any idea what might be going on here, and why after Reflex successfully loads my 'good' Windows, when I shut it down and reboot, it continues to revert to 'defective' Windows?

Harry



Attachments
SystemConfig_1_26_2018E.png (6 views, 12.00 KB)
F12BootMenuE.jpg (8 views, 76.00 KB)
UnknownBootMenuE.jpg (7 views, 58.00 KB)
F8_BootMenuE.jpg (6 views, 41.00 KB)
jphughan
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Sorry, I wasn’t clear. The Rescue environment contains an application called File Explorer. That is completely unrelated to Windows Explorer since Windows PE does not have a native Windows Explorer interface, so Macrium added a File Explorer application instead — and you only see it while booted into the Rescue environment. It’s in the very lower-left corner of the interface and has the icon of a folder, next to the shutdown button or the Command Prompt button.

To make the boot menu recovery option available but not shown at all, I think you have to set the timeout to 0 in msconfig, but the fact that you have a boot menu recovery option created in the Windows BCD (Boot Configuration Database) means it will still be available during special boot cases, as you already now see in your F8 boot menu. On Win8 and above you would select “Boot a different operating system” through a different mechanism since the F8 mechanism doesn’t exist anymore. However, you won’t ever see the Rescue boot option in the F12 menu since it’s not on a separate partition. Basically, your F12 menu chooses a bootloader file (or active boot partition, depending on the system), which in either case loads the Windows BCD on your hard drive, and THAT then contains the option to boot the Rescue environment, or of course regular Windows. Booting can be complicated. Smile

Not knowing anything about your system, Windows installation, or this utility that created the mess in the first place, I’m not sure what to tell you about that “defective” installation. It does look like there’s only one Windows installation on the system though, which is expected. However, that F12 menu is a little strange. I have a theory, but to test it, see if using F12 to boot the “Windows Boot Manager” entry consistently behaves differently from the other Samsung SSD option higher in the list. If so, I may have an idea. But it would also be nice to know more about that utility given that it apparently caused the problem.
Edited 26 January 2018 8:52 PM by jphughan
harrymacrium
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jphughan - 26 January 2018 8:44 PM
Sorry, I wasn’t clear. The Rescue environment contains an application called File Explorer. That is completely unrelated to Windows Explorer since Windows PE does not have a native Windows Explorer interface, so Macrium added a File Explorer application instead — and you only see it while booted into the Rescue environment. It’s in the very lower-left corner of the interface and has the icon of a folder, next to the shutdown button or the Command Prompt button.

To make the boot menu recovery option available but not shown at all, I think you have to set the timeout to 0 in msconfig, but the fact that you have a boot menu recovery option created in the Windows BCD (Boot Configuration Database) means it will still be available during special boot cases, as you already now see in your F8 boot menu. On Win8 and above you would select “Boot a different operating system” through a different mechanism since the F8 mechanism doesn’t exist anymore. However, you won’t ever see the Rescue boot option in the F12 menu since it’s not on a separate partition. Basically, your F12 menu chooses a bootloader file (or active boot partition, depending on the system), which in either case loads the Windows BCD on your hard drive, and THAT then contains the option to boot the Rescue environment, or of course regular Windows. Booting can be complicated. Smile

Not knowing anything about your system, Windows installation, or this utility that created the mess in the first place, I’m not sure what to tell you about that “defective” installation. It does look like there’s only one Windows installation on the system though, which is expected. However, that F12 menu is a little strange. I have a theory, but to test it, see if using F12 to boot the “Windows Boot Manager” entry consistently behaves differently from the other Samsung SSD option higher in the list. If so, I may have an idea. But it would also be nice to know more about that utility given that it apparently caused the problem.

jp:

Thanks for explaining where to find File Explorer. When I next boot into Rescue, I will look for it. Also, I will try, using F12, to boot using the 'Windows Boot Manager' option. I'll leave changing the timeout option for later.

When I booted for the 2nd time today (before I sent my last post), the F12 menu was reduced from what I sent you. (Of course I forgot to take a picture of it). I think most (or all) of the Generic USB Reader entries were not there. But just my memory.

My system. As I said in my 1st post, I have a licensed copy of Reflect Home Edition (64 bit) v6.3.1849 on a Windows 7 Pro (64 bit) SP1 desktop computer. C: drive is an SSD. That is where my OS, programs, most of my data, etc. is stored. Reflex images my C: drive. I also have a conventional D: hard drive. I back up most everything to it (I have a program called Second Copy which automatically backs up Word, Excel, etc. files every few minutes to DSmile, and I also store 'stuff' on D: that I don't think I will access enough to put on my C: drive.

I also have a Lenovo Laptop, also running Windows 7 Pro (64 bit) SP1. It is set up almost the same as my desktop, except I don't put programs infrequently used on the laptop. There I run a free version of Reflect (v7.1.2833). The laptop only has a C: drive (their Q: Recovery drive is not accessible my the user), so I back up C: over my network to a hard drive I have in an XP computer. The laptop is what I am using these last few days to do most of my communication with the outside world.

Also, I have Windows set so I receive a notice when there are updates. I do NOT allow automatic updating. I subscribe to a newsletter called Windows Secrets, and Susan Bradley writes a column about all the patches that Microsoft releases, and whether they should be installed or not. She has recently written 2 columns about the Spectre & Meltdown potential vulnerabilities, and the havoc that the Windows and Intel 'fixes' have caused on some machines. I have not installed ANY of these.

On Jan. 24, I did install 7 or 8 Office updates to fix various problems. That is why I did a Macrium Image that evening. When I booted Jan. 25, everything was fine, until I installed a calculator utility later in the day. Then I began to see programs not acting correctly, so that is when I rebooted and subsequently noticed all of the problems. The same Office updates were installed on my laptop (but not the calculator utility), and it has no problems.

The utility is called Mottsoft Free Calc. For simple calculations, it is much more flexible than the calculator that comes with Windows 7. You can learn about the program here: http://www.moffsoft.com/freecalc.htm
And it can be downloaded here: http://www.moffsoft.com/downloads.htm
I downloaded it from Site1 (Mottsoft). The filename is: MottFreeCalcSetup.exe. Running the .exe file will install it. BE CAREFUL!!

I have two anti-virus type programs on my desktop. Today, after I used Reflex to restore my desktop, I ran the free version of Malware bytes (updates are current) and no problems were found. I also have Microsoft Security Essentials. I am running a Full Scan now, which may take an hour or so. If it finds any problems, I will post about it Saturday.

I plan to run another Image backup tonight (so I don't have to go back and update individual files I have created). But I am NOT going to shut down my computer. I'll go back to work on it this weekend sometime.

Harry


Edited 27 January 2018 5:20 AM by harrymacrium
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harrymacrium - 27 January 2018 5:18 AM
jphughan - 26 January 2018 8:44 PM
Sorry, I wasn’t clear. The Rescue environment contains an application called File Explorer. That is completely unrelated to Windows Explorer since Windows PE does not have a native Windows Explorer interface, so Macrium added a File Explorer application instead — and you only see it while booted into the Rescue environment. It’s in the very lower-left corner of the interface and has the icon of a folder, next to the shutdown button or the Command Prompt button.

To make the boot menu recovery option available but not shown at all, I think you have to set the timeout to 0 in msconfig, but the fact that you have a boot menu recovery option created in the Windows BCD (Boot Configuration Database) means it will still be available during special boot cases, as you already now see in your F8 boot menu. On Win8 and above you would select “Boot a different operating system” through a different mechanism since the F8 mechanism doesn’t exist anymore. However, you won’t ever see the Rescue boot option in the F12 menu since it’s not on a separate partition. Basically, your F12 menu chooses a bootloader file (or active boot partition, depending on the system), which in either case loads the Windows BCD on your hard drive, and THAT then contains the option to boot the Rescue environment, or of course regular Windows. Booting can be complicated. Smile

Not knowing anything about your system, Windows installation, or this utility that created the mess in the first place, I’m not sure what to tell you about that “defective” installation. It does look like there’s only one Windows installation on the system though, which is expected. However, that F12 menu is a little strange. I have a theory, but to test it, see if using F12 to boot the “Windows Boot Manager” entry consistently behaves differently from the other Samsung SSD option higher in the list. If so, I may have an idea. But it would also be nice to know more about that utility given that it apparently caused the problem.

jp:

Thanks for explaining where to find File Explorer. When I next boot into Rescue, I will look for it. Also, I will try, using F12, to boot using the 'Windows Boot Manager' option. I'll leave changing the timeout option for later.

When I booted for the 2nd time today (before I sent my last post), the F12 menu was reduced from what I sent you. (Of course I forgot to take a picture of it). I think most (or all) of the Generic USB Reader entries were not there. But just my memory.

My system. As I said in my 1st post, I have a licensed copy of Reflect Home Edition (64 bit) v6.3.1849 on a Windows 7 Pro (64 bit) SP1 desktop computer. C: drive is an SSD. That is where my OS, programs, most of my data, etc. is stored. Reflex images my C: drive. I also have a conventional D: hard drive. I back up most everything to it (I have a program called Second Copy which automatically backs up Word, Excel, etc. files every few minutes to DSmile, and I also store 'stuff' on D: that I don't think I will access enough to put on my C: drive.

I also have a Lenovo Laptop, also running Windows 7 Pro (64 bit) SP1. It is set up almost the same as my desktop, except I don't put programs infrequently used on the laptop. There I run a free version of Reflect (v7.1.2833). The laptop only has a C: drive (their Q: Recovery drive is not accessible my the user), so I back up C: over my network to a hard drive I have in an XP computer. The laptop is what I am using these last few days to do most of my communication with the outside world.

Also, I have Windows set so I receive a notice when there are updates. I do NOT allow automatic updating. I subscribe to a newsletter called Windows Secrets, and Susan Bradley writes a column about all the patches that Microsoft releases, and whether they should be installed or not. She has recently written 2 columns about the Spectre & Meltdown potential vulnerabilities, and the havoc that the Windows and Intel 'fixes' have caused on some machines. I have not installed ANY of these.

On Jan. 24, I did install 7 or 8 Office updates to fix various problems. That is why I did a Macrium Image that evening. When I booted Jan. 25, everything was fine, until I installed a calculator utility later in the day. Then I began to see programs not acting correctly, so that is when I rebooted and subsequently noticed all of the problems. The same Office updates were installed on my laptop (but not the calculator utility), and it has no problems.

The utility is called Mottsoft Free Calc. For simple calculations, it is much more flexible than the calculator that comes with Windows 7. You can learn about the program here: http://www.moffsoft.com/freecalc.htm
And it can be downloaded here: http://www.moffsoft.com/downloads.htm
I downloaded it from Site1 (Mottsoft). The filename is: MottFreeCalcSetup.exe. Running the .exe file will install it. BE CAREFUL!!

I have two anti-virus type programs on my desktop. Today, after I used Reflex to restore my desktop, I ran the free version of Malware bytes (updates are current) and no problems were found. I also have Microsoft Security Essentials. I am running a Full Scan now, which may take an hour or so. If it finds any problems, I will post about it Saturday.

I plan to run another Image backup tonight (so I don't have to go back and update individual files I have created). But I am NOT going to shut down my computer. I'll go back to work on it this weekend sometime.

Harry


jp:

Both my scans ran fine last night. Malwarebytes scanned 295,983 items, and found no threats. Microsoft Security Essentials (Full scan) took several hours, scanned 3,134,967 items and found no threats.

I created another Reflex image backup last night. I did NOT shut down my computer, but left it on all night. Is working fine today.

Today I did further investigation on the boot devices listed on F12BootMenuE.jpg (attached to my Jan. 26 3 PM posting). They are listed below in the order they appeared on that file.

    Device Name            Comments
1.    Generic USB MS Reader     Not in use.
2.    Generic USB SD Reader     Not in use.
3.    Generic USB CF Reader     Not in use.
4.    Generic USB SM Reader    Not in use.
I think all of these are on the front of my computer case, listed as F: through I:
Two are USB 2.0, and two are USB 3.0. I don't know which is which on the above four.

5.    Mitsumi USB                      External floppy drive (A:  )
6.    P5: ATAPI                           CD/DVD drive (E:  )
7.    PO: Samsung SSD840        SSD drive (C:  ) My primary drive, which contains the OS, programs, etc.
8.    P1: ST1000                         Conventional hard drive (D:  ) My back up drive.
9.    Windows Boot Manager       (PO: Samsung SSD….)

Based on your last post, I assume I should rearrange the order, so the top three are:
1.    Windows Boot Manager       (PO: Samsung SSD….)
2.    PO: Samsung SSD840        SSD drive (C:  )
3.    P5: ATAPI                           CD/DVD drive (E:  )

Should the remaining 6 be in any specific order?

There are three items on UnknownBootMenuE.jpg which I don't understand. Perhaps you can define them for me, and what they do.
1. Last Known Good Configuration (advanced)
2. Directory Services Restore Mode
3. Debugging Mode

I have just written to Macrium Support, attached 'reflectv6.1-1023-x64-15.dmp', and a link to this thread.

Thanks again for all your help.

Harry

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For the card reader, booting from a memory card is a fairly uncommon thing, but MS = Sony Memory Stick; SD = Secure Digital; CF = CompactFlash. I can’t remember what SM stands for, but all of those cards are shaped differently, so if you really wanted to, you could match them up visually. Aren’t the slots themselves marked?

The boot order you proposed makes sense, and no the rest don’t have to be in a specific order since you’d probably use the F12 one-tome boot mechanism any time you wanted to boot from those devices anyway.

For the Windows Boot Manager options (your unknown boot menu), Last Known Good is an option that comes into play after installing things like drivers. For example, if you install a driver and then find your system won’t boot anymore, choosing Last Known Good should load Windows without that driver, thereby allowing your system to start again. Windows records successful boots, which wouldn’t have occurred in the configuration that involved that new driver, so this option works by having Windows revert to the last configuration that resulted in a recorded successful boot.

Directory Services Restore Mode only applies to Windows Active Directory Domain Controllers and has to be used in order to restore the AD database. If you don’t know what those terms mean, that’s more typing than I want to do here on my phone, but Google will inform you. Smile

I’ve never used debugging mode, but I would imagine at the very least or turns on a ton of extra logging, which can significantly slow down the system. But debugging is useful primarily for people like software developers when they’re testing things or trying to figure out why something isn’t working. I would imagine Macrium uses it extensively, particularly when working on features like CBT and MIG.
Edited 27 January 2018 9:46 PM by jphughan
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jphughan - 27 January 2018 9:43 PM
For the card reader, booting from a memory card is a fairly uncommon thing, but MS = Sony Memory Stick; SD = Secure Digital; CF = CompactFlash. I can’t remember what SM stands for, but all of those cards are shaped differently, so if you really wanted to, you could match them up visually. Aren’t the slots themselves marked?

The boot order you proposed makes sense, and no the rest don’t have to be in a specific order since you’d probably use the F12 one-tome boot mechanism any time you wanted to boot from those devices anyway.

For the Windows Boot Manager options (your unknown boot menu), Last Known Good is an option that comes into play after installing things like drivers. For example, if you install a driver and then find your system won’t boot anymore, choosing Last Known Good should load Windows without that driver, thereby allowing your system to start again. Windows records successful boots, which wouldn’t have occurred in the configuration that involved that new driver, so this option works by having Windows revert to the last configuration that resulted in a recorded successful boot.

Directory Services Restore Mode only applies to Windows Active Directory Domain Controllers and has to be used in order to restore the AD database. If you don’t know what those terms mean, that’s more typing than I want to do here on my phone, but Google will inform you. Smile

I’ve never used debugging mode, but I would imagine at the very least or turns on a ton of extra logging, which can significantly slow down the system. But debugging is useful primarily for people like software developers when they’re testing things or trying to figure out why something isn’t working. I would imagine Macrium uses it extensively, particularly when working on features like CBT and MIG.

jp:

I have not forgotten you, but I have run into an 'unusual' occurrence the last few days on booting. I have a little more work to do before I get back to you on that.

To answer some of your previous questions:
1. I only have Windows 7 on my desktop. No other operating systems or emulators.
2. Regarding the 4 Generic USB readers that appear when doing an F12 on boot. Looking at my motherboard manual, there are two USB 2 headers, with a note that they can provide 2 USB ports using an optional USB bracket (which I may have). There is also one USB 3 header, which according to the manual can provide 2 USB ports. There is an optional front panel that provides 2 USB 3 ports. I have this panel.
On the front panel of my computer are 2 USB 3 ports and 2 USB 2 ports. On the rear panel is one USB 2/1.1 port, and 4 USB 3/2 ports. The Mitsumi USB listed on the F12 boot list is a floppy drive (A: ) which is connected to one of the 4 USB 3/2 ports on the rear.
3. The motherboard has 6 SATA 3 (6Gb/s) connectors. The Samsung 250 GB SSD is connected to P0, the 1T hard drive to P1, and the Atari DVD/CD to P5.

Have you had a chance to run the MottFreeCalcSetup.exe file, and if so, were there any problems?

Harry



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