Disc Lettering


Author
Message
Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
I am cloning my C drive to an external USB drive.  I will replace the C drive with a new, larger hard drive.  Should I change the letter of the new drive to C before cloning to it from the external drive?

jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3K, Visits: 21K
No, and you probably wouldn't be able to anyway.  First, Windows uses "C" for the partition that contains the running Windows installation, so if you ran the clone from within Windows, that letter wouldn't even be available to be assigned to a target partition.  Second, there's nothing on the partition itself that says, "I should be assigned drive letter X", so there's no need to assign letters before a clone operation.  Drive letters are dynamically assigned by Windows, and although Windows will in some cases remember what drive letter a particular partition was last assigned and try to reassign that letter when it next sees that partition, Windows won't "reserve" drive letters.  And third, if you created a new partition upfront on the target and then ran a clone to it, Reflect would destroy the existing partition and recreate it as part of the clone operation anyway, so any letter you had assigned beforehand wouldn't matter because Windows would see the post-clone partition as a completely separate entity.

Just run the clone to the new disk, and when you install it internally, the OS partition will automatically be assigned "C".  Also, make sure you do NOT clone just the C partition on the source disk.  You want to clone the entire disk or at least understand why you're excluding certain partitions on the source if you choose to do so.

Edited 22 January 2018 7:07 PM by jphughan
Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
jphughan - 22 January 2018 7:00 PM
No, and you probably wouldn't be able to anyway.  First, Windows uses "C" for the partition that contains the running Windows installation, so if you ran the clone from within Windows, that letter wouldn't even be available to be assigned to a target partition.  Second, there's nothing on the partition itself that says, "I should be assigned drive letter X", so there's no need to assign letters before a clone operation.  Drive letters are dynamically assigned by Windows, and although Windows will in some cases remember what drive letter a particular partition was last assigned and try to reassign that letter when it next sees that partition, Windows won't "reserve" drive letters.  And third, if you created a new partition upfront on the target and then ran a clone to it, Reflect would destroy the existing partition and recreate it as part of the clone operation anyway, so any letter you had assigned beforehand wouldn't matter because Windows would see the post-clone partition as a completely separate entity.

Just run the clone to the new disk, and when you install it internally, the OS partition will automatically be assigned "C".  Also, make sure you do NOT clone just the C partition on the source disk.  You want to clone the entire disk or at least understand why you're excluding certain partitions on the source if you choose to do so.

OK.  I think I've got it.

Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
Bob_Z - 22 January 2018 7:12 PM
jphughan - 22 January 2018 7:00 PM
No, and you probably wouldn't be able to anyway.  First, Windows uses "C" for the partition that contains the running Windows installation, so if you ran the clone from within Windows, that letter wouldn't even be available to be assigned to a target partition.  Second, there's nothing on the partition itself that says, "I should be assigned drive letter X", so there's no need to assign letters before a clone operation.  Drive letters are dynamically assigned by Windows, and although Windows will in some cases remember what drive letter a particular partition was last assigned and try to reassign that letter when it next sees that partition, Windows won't "reserve" drive letters.  And third, if you created a new partition upfront on the target and then ran a clone to it, Reflect would destroy the existing partition and recreate it as part of the clone operation anyway, so any letter you had assigned beforehand wouldn't matter because Windows would see the post-clone partition as a completely separate entity.

Just run the clone to the new disk, and when you install it internally, the OS partition will automatically be assigned "C".  Also, make sure you do NOT clone just the C partition on the source disk.  You want to clone the entire disk or at least understand why you're excluding certain partitions on the source if you choose to do so.

OK.  I think I've got it.

One more question, please.  I'm cloning to a larger, empty external drive.  Do I have to do anyathing to the partitions on that drive? And, when I go to the new internal drive, which is also larger than the old internal drive, do I have to do anything to those parttitions?
jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3K, Visits: 21K
You don't have to do anything special to "prep" a clone target before you perform a clone.  If you want the cloned instances of certain partitions to be larger on the target than they are on the source, since after all you have more space on the target, then you can specify that as part of the clone job.  To do that, in the first step of the clone wizard where you see the Source and Destination, select your destination disk.  Then rather than just choosing "Copy partitions to destination", drag each individual partition down from the Source row to the Destination, working left to right.  When you reach a partition you wish to resize on the destination, drag it down, then BEFORE dragging down the next one, select that partition in the Destination row, select "Cloned Partition Properties", and specify the desired size for that partition.

In terms of your next question, is the "new internal drive" a physically different disk from the "larger, empty external drive"? I thought there were only two disks involved here -- namely your current internal drive that is your clone source, and the external drive that will be your clone target -- and that your plan was to run this clone job to the external disk and then install that external disk internally afterward so that it would become your replacement internal disk.  If on the other hand you're running a clone job to BOTH your USB drive (as a backup) AND to a new internal disk that will replace your current internal disk, then the advice I just wrote would apply to the clone onto the new internal disk.  Technically you COULD also apply that advice to the external drive, but there wouldn't really be a point because if the USB drive is always going to be a backup, then the clone target will never have more data than the clone source, so there's no point in upsizing the target beyond the source's size.  Some people however choose to do the opposite: They'll REDUCE the size of the partitions on the clone target figuring they'll never fill up their source to capacity, and that then allows them to use the remainder of their clone target disk for storing other things.  However, cloning to a partition that's smaller than the source prevents Rapid Delta Clone from working, and storing other data on a disk that is acting as a clone target can be a bit dangerous, so that strategy has to be managed with a degree of care.

Lastly, if your USB drive is being used solely as a backup, you might prefer to store image backups on the USB drive instead of just having it act as a clone target.  I wrote a long post about imaging vs. cloning here if you're interested.

Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
jphughan - 22 January 2018 7:54 PM
You don't have to do anything special to "prep" a clone target before you perform a clone.  If you want the cloned instances of certain partitions to be larger on the target than they are on the source, since after all you have more space on the target, then you can specify that as part of the clone job.  To do that, in the first step of the clone wizard where you see the Source and Destination, select your destination disk.  Then rather than just choosing "Copy partitions to destination", drag each individual partition down from the Source row to the Destination, working left to right.  When you reach a partition you wish to resize on the destination, drag it down, then BEFORE dragging down the next one, select that partition in the Destination row, select "Cloned Partition Properties", and specify the desired size for that partition.

In terms of your next question, is the "new internal drive" a physically different disk from the "larger, empty external drive"? I thought there were only two disks involved here -- namely your current internal drive that is your clone source, and the external drive that will be your clone target -- and that your plan was to run this clone job to the external disk and then install that external disk internally afterward so that it would become your replacement internal disk.  If on the other hand you're running a clone job to BOTH your USB drive (as a backup) AND to a new internal disk that will replace your current internal disk, then the advice I just wrote would apply to the clone onto the new internal disk.  Technically you COULD also apply that advice to the external drive, but there wouldn't really be a point because if the USB drive is always going to be a backup, then the clone target will never have more data than the clone source, so there's no point in upsizing the target beyond the source's size.  Some people however choose to do the opposite: They'll REDUCE the size of the partitions on the clone target figuring they'll never fill up their source to capacity, and that then allows them to use the remainder of their clone target disk for storing other things.  However, cloning to a partition that's smaller than the source prevents Rapid Delta Clone from working, and storing other data on a disk that is acting as a clone target can be a bit dangerous, so that strategy has to be managed with a degree of care.

Lastly, if your USB drive is being used solely as a backup, you might prefer to store image backups on the USB drive instead of just having it act as a clone target.  I wrote a long post about imaging vs. cloning here if you're interested.

The external drive is being used as a backup for the clone and for other storage as well.  After I clone to the external USB drive, I am removing the current internal drive and replacing it with a large drive to which I will clone from the external drive.  I gather in that case, I need to expand the partition to fit the entire new drive?

jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3K, Visits: 21K
Bob_Z - 22 January 2018 8:06 PM
The external drive is being used as a backup for the clone and for other storage as well.  After I clone to the external USB drive, I am removing the current internal drive and replacing it with a large drive to which I will clone from the external drive.  I gather in that case, I need to expand the partition to fit the entire new drive?

Correct.  If you wait until AFTER the clone to fill the remainder of the new drive, you'll only be able to extend the last (rightmost) partition on the disk.  Since that is not always the OS partition, it's a good idea to do your resizing while staging the clone in the wizard, as I described above.  The fact that you'll be using the USB drive as the clone source for the new drive (rather than the original internal drive) makes no difference to the steps involved with resizing during staging. Good luck!

Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
jphughan - 22 January 2018 8:39 PM
Bob_Z - 22 January 2018 8:06 PM
The external drive is being used as a backup for the clone and for other storage as well.  After I clone to the external USB drive, I am removing the current internal drive and replacing it with a large drive to which I will clone from the external drive.  I gather in that case, I need to expand the partition to fit the entire new drive?

Correct.  If you wait until AFTER the clone to fill the remainder of the new drive, you'll only be able to extend the last (rightmost) partition on the disk.  Since that is not always the OS partition, it's a good idea to do your resizing while staging the clone in the wizard, as I described above.  The fact that you'll be using the USB drive as the clone source for the new drive (rather than the original internal drive) makes no difference to the steps involved with resizing during staging. Good luck!

Back again.  Have not done the cloning yet.  What i want to do is clone the internal SSD drive now in the machine to a new, larger SSD drive via a USB/SATA cable and then swap the new SSD drive for the present internal drive.  The smaller drive has what appears to be 3 partitions:  a System Reserve of 100 MB, which I presume is the OS; , a  middle partition of 446 GB, which is essentially filled and I presume is apps and data, and a third partition of 450 MB, I'm not sure what this partition is for. 
   When I move these to the new 1 TB disc, I would leave the System Reserve as is and expand the second partition to fill the disc with the exception of the third partition?

jphughan
jphughan
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (4.3K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3K, Visits: 21K
The 100MB partition contains files necessary to boot the system, but not the entire OS — Windows hasn’t fit into 100MB since Windows 95. The large partition is your C drive, which contains your OS, applications, and data. The last one is a Recovery partition that contains some Microsoft tools intended to help recover from an unboltable system. It’s not essential for Reflect users, but Windows will recreate it during OS upgrades if you delete it anyway, so you may as well keep it. But yes, when you go through the clone wizard, you would want to drag the first partition down leaving its size unchanged, then drag down the large second partition and use the Cloned Partition Properties interface to change its size to maximum size minus the size of the third partition, then drag the third partition down.
Bob_Z
Bob_Z
New Member
New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)New Member (30 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 27, Visits: 98
jphughan - 26 January 2018 11:02 PM
The 100MB partition contains files necessary to boot the system, but not the entire OS — Windows hasn’t fit into 100MB since Windows 95. The large partition is your C drive, which contains your OS, applications, and data. The last one is a Recovery partition that contains some Microsoft tools intended to help recover from an unboltable system. It’s not essential for Reflect users, but Windows will recreate it during OS upgrades if you delete it anyway, so you may as well keep it. But yes, when you go through the clone wizard, you would want to drag the first partition down leaving its size unchanged, then drag down the large second partition and use the Cloned Partition Properties interface to change its size to maximum size minus the size of the third partition, then drag the third partition down.
Thanks.  I should clone rather than image the drive?

GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Similar Topics

Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search