Moving Win 7 tfrom HDD to SSD


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Hans L
Hans L
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Hello:

I intend to go the Windows Sysprep route (https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW7/Using+Windows+sysprep+and+deploying+using+Macrium+Reflect) to move an image of Win 7 from an HDD to a new SSD on my wife's computer. There are a slew of partitions on her existing HDD ... is there anything i need to do to the new SSD because of this (format, partition)?

Thanks,

Hans L

jphughan
jphughan
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Sysprep is only intended for scenarios where you want to build an image on one PC and deploy it to multiple other PCs, e.g. in an enterprise or school scenario.  If you're just replacing an HDD with an SSD in the same PC, there is absolutely no need to sysprep, in fact you probably want to avoid it.  All you'd need to is capture the image, remove the HDD, install the SSD, boot into your Rescue Media, and restore that image to the SSD.

If on the other hand you're capturing an image on one PC and intend to migrate it to another PC, that normally might require sysprep, but because you have a licensed copy of Reflect, I would recommend avoiding sysprep (at least at first) and trying Macrium ReDeploy instead, per the guide here.  That is much less "meddlesome" than sysprep, and if ReDeploy doesn't get things going on the new PC properly, you can always go back to the old PC and sysprep it before capturing a new image.  Also note that in a migration scenario, your new PC will need a license for the same version and edition of Windows that the image you're restoring uses.  The new system would also need to support running Windows 7.  Some newer PCs with more recent hardware specifically do not support running Windows 7.

But whether or not you end up going with sysprep, you don't have to do anything to prep the target SSD.  Regardless of whether the image you'll be restoring has been sysprepped, you can just choose to wipe whatever is currently on the target SSD before your image is restored onto it.

Edited 18 January 2018 9:35 PM by jphughan
Hans L
Hans L
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jphughan - 18 January 2018 9:25 PM
Sysprep is only intended for scenarios where you want to build an image on one PC and deploy it to multiple other PCs, e.g. in an enterprise or school scenario.  If you're just replacing an HDD with an SSD in the same PC, there is absolutely no need to sysprep, in fact you probably want to avoid it.  All you'd need to is capture the image, remove the HDD, install the SSD, boot into your Rescue Media, and restore that image to the SSD.

If on the other hand you're capturing an image on one PC and intend to migrate it to another PC, that normally might require sysprep, but because you have a licensed copy of Reflect, I would recommend avoiding sysprep (at least at first) and trying Macrium ReDeploy instead, per the guide here.  That is much less "meddlesome" than sysprep, and if ReDeploy doesn't get things going on the new PC properly, you can always go back to the old PC and sysprep it before capturing a new image.  Also note that in a migration scenario, your new PC will need a license for the same version and edition of Windows that the image you're restoring uses.  The new system would also need to support running Windows 7.  Some newer PCs with more recent hardware specifically do not support running Windows 7.

But whether or not you end up going with sysprep, you don't have to do anything to prep the target SSD.  Regardless of whether the image you'll be restoring has been sysprepped, you can just choose to wipe whatever is currently on the target SSD before your image is restored onto it.

Thank you very much. I now know exactly what to do.

Regards,

Hans
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