Very slow disk cloning


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crazy_system
crazy_system
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I'm using the Macrium rescue software to clone a 256 GB SATA drive to another same drive
connected by USB 3.1 > SATA cable and a USB 3.1 port.

No special drivers were loaded.

I'm getting a clone time of about 16 hrs.

I think there's something wrong somewhere.

I'm using WinPE for Windows 10 and not sure whether it includes drivers for USB 3.1

but with the time it's taking right now - I suspect that's USB 2 speeds.



I can't use the Macrium for Windows software because the disk that I'm cloning is running MacOS.


jphughan
jphughan
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WinPE 10 definitely includes USB 3.0 support. If it didn’t and you didn’t supply drivers either, the ports wouldn’t work at all; they wouldn’t just fall back to 2.0 speeds. Have you tested that cable with another disk or that disk with another cable to isolate variables?

Also, you should be able to clone a Mac OS disk from within Windows. The fact that Windows can’t interpret its file system doesn’t mean Reflect can’t clone it. After all, Windows PE is just a stripped down version of Windows, so if you can do it in WinPE, you can do it in Windows.
Edited 23 December 2017 9:33 PM by jphughan
crazy_system
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Thanks for the response.

I should clarify it's a 256 GB Samsung SSD - actually both drives are.

I had a USB 3.0 => SATA cable - that was slow.

I then bought a USB 3.1 => SATA cable - same speed - no difference.

So it's not the cable.

The drive is a standard Samsung 850 Pro SSD.


Maybe I can download a USB 3.1 driver from somewhere and install it.

I actually also bought a PCI-E card - but there was no drivers on the CD that I could install
on the Macrium startup drive.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074QK68XS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can't use Windows Macrium software - because this is a different PC running with just 1 SSD drive running MacOS.


jphughan
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Oh ok, got it. There are no USB 3.0 drivers for Windows 10 or WinPE 10 because those kernels have native support for it. There are only USB 3.0 drivers for Windows 7 (WinPE 3.1), but those won’t work on newer Windows kernels.

USB 3.0 and USB 3.1 also aren’t always different. USB 3.0, which operates at 5 Gbps, was retroactively rebranded as USB 3.1 Gen 1. The newer standard that operates at 10 Gbps is called USB 3.1 Gen 2. And some products that advertise USB 3.1 support are only Gen 1. There are relatively few products with a USB-A (“regular USB”) connector that support USB 3.1 Gen 2, and even fewer PCs that support 3.1 Gen 2 on their USB-A ports. Gen 2 is typically only found with USB-C connectors, and not even all USB-C devices/connectors support Gen 2.

All that said, that clone time is still inordinately long. Do you perhaps have an external hard drive that you could use to capture an image of your source drive, after which you could install your current clone target internally and then restore that image onto it? As long as you knew the external hard drive performed well under other circumstances, that would indicate whether this is a case of slow reading from the source or slow writing to the target.
crazy_system
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jphughan - 23 December 2017 11:18 PM
Oh ok, got it. There are no USB 3.0 drivers for Windows 10 or WinPE 10 because those kernels have native support for it. There are only USB 3.0 drivers for Windows 7 (WinPE 3.1), but those won’t work on newer Windows kernels.USB 3.0 and USB 3.1 also aren’t always different. USB 3.0, which operates at 5 Gbps, was retroactively rebranded as USB 3.1 Gen 1. The newer standard that operates at 10 Gbps is called USB 3.1 Gen 2. And some products that advertise USB 3.1 support are only Gen 1. There are relatively few products with a USB-A (“regular USB”) connector that support USB 3.1 Gen 2, and even fewer PCs that support 3.1 Gen 2 on their USB-A ports. Gen 2 is typically only found with USB-C connectors, and not even all USB-C devices/connectors support Gen 2.All that said, that clone time is still inordinately long. Do you perhaps have an external hard drive that you could use to capture an image of your source drive, after which you could install your current clone target internally and then restore that image onto it? As long as you knew the external hard drive performed well under other circumstances, that would indicate whether this is a case of slow reading from the source or slow writing to the target.

Thanks for the response.

My PC supports USB 3.1 gen 1 ports - 5Gbps.

That's why I bought a PCI card that supports gen 2 and a cable that supports gen2.

But the PCI card ports were recognized by Macrium rescue software (w/o drivers) - so I assume it's running at least 5Gbps.

Given that the ideal time for cloning 256GB should have been around 7 mins. (right??).

I got that by 256 GB * 8 = 2048 Gb / 5 / 60 = approx 7 minutes.

Assuming even 3-4x that - it should have taken no longer than 20-30 minutes.

Even at USB 2 speeds - ideally about 1.5 hrs - but let's say it takes 3-5 hrs.


So I'm thinking something in the Macrium WinPE implementation -

If I clone a similar size drive using the Macrium Windows software - it takes about 15 minutes.






jphughan
jphughan
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If the PCI card supports Gen 2 and so does everything else in the chain, it would be running Gen 2 since both variants of USB 3.1 use the same xHCI driver standard. You still may not get the maximum theoretical throughput for other reasons, but something is definitely wrong since 16 hours is crazy for 256GB. I doubt it’s WinPE, though. Have you tried using the built-in USB ports rather than the PCI card? Otherwise, I really wonder if the Mac OS file system aspect has anything to do with this, perhaps Reflect having trouble with the default intelligent sector copy mode. Have you tried switching the clone to forensic mode?

Would another option be to remove the internal drive you’re trying to clone from, connecting it via that USB adapter to another machine (perhaps one where Reflect runs in Windows for convenience), running an image capture to somewhere, then connecting the intended clone target and restoring that image onto it?
Edited 24 December 2017 3:44 PM by jphughan
Seekforever
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Reflect can't do intelligent sector copy on a MAC disk, can it? The KB says:  clusters in use and changed clusters (intelligent copy) is supported by FAT16, FAT32, NTFS and Ext 2,3,4 file systems.  All other file systems and unformatted partitions will be imaged on a sector by sector basis, i.e, every sector in the partition will be copied.
​​ If so, it should revert to forensic automatically but maybe it isn't switching properly. Deliberately selecting the Forensic mode as suggested, if it wasn't done, may indeed help.
I like the image suggestion, in the rare circumstances a clone would be suitable for my job, I still do it by an image and restore.​
If you can do a large file copy within WinPE between 2 disks, not the MAC one, it might show up hardware/software limitations if any on the current configuration. with Reflect out of the picture.
Edited 24 December 2017 8:54 PM by Seekforever
jphughan
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Yes, Reflect should switch to forensic mode automatically, but I thought that maybe something about an HFS+ disk might have thrown it for a loop and that explicitly specifying forensic might change behavior.

A large file copy in WinPE would indeed be an interesting test, and Reflect’s included File Explorer utility available in the taskbar in the Rescue interface would facilitate that test.
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