Moving Disc Clone to SSD


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xpac5896
xpac5896
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Very simple question. How do I move my Cloned disc back to my SSD. I clone once a week and this last update to Win 10 really screwed my system up. I've been trying to find out using the FAQ's but all I do is read and and I just don't have the time. One other thing, I don't know if it has any bearing on this but I Clone to a 1tb drive where my  ssd IS 512. Just so you know here's a pic of the drives. I know this must be simple but darned if I can find it.
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jphughan
jphughan
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Set up a manual job that clones in the opposite direction.  Select the disk you've normally been using as a clone target, click "Action > Clone this disk" under it so that it becomes the source for this specific job, and select your normal source disk as the target. Smile

Edited 1 December 2017 3:28 PM by jphughan
xpac5896
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jphughan - 1 December 2017 3:28 PM
Set up a manual job that clones in the opposite direction.  Select the disk you've normally been using as a clone target, click "Action > Clone this disk" under it so that it becomes the source for this specific job, and select your normal source disk as the target. Smile

Thank you very much for the information. I do have another question and from what I've read it's up in the air but is it better to clone than to image? The reason why I ask is because you alway have to choose between incremental and so on. In my own mind (which is  to be determined) it would be better to clone because you don't have to worry about all that other stuff. Plus i'm guessing it's much faster. Just curious.
jphughan
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Cloning and imaging each have their own benefits and drawbacks, although for general backup purposes, I greatly prefer images, for several reasons:

- Imaging allows you to retain multiple backups, whereas a clone only stores a single state of the source.  So let's say you want to recover an older version of a file or roll back to a point before you installed an application that turned out to cause cause problems, but you don't realize this need until a while later.  In a clone scenario, if you've already run another clone since that old file version was overwritten/deleted or that application was installed, then you're out of luck. With imaging, you'd be able to keep and look through backups captured at various points in time to extract the file of interest or roll your system back to the desired point.  Additionally, in a clone scenario if your clone source fails during a clone operation, then you would be left with nothing.  With image backups, as long as you have enough capacity at the destination that you don't have to delete all of your existing backups in order to create a new one, then you'll be able to recover from an earlier backup in this scenario.

- Imaging allows you to use your destination disk for other purposes since images are just files, whereas in a clone scenario, you're dedicating the entire destination disk to being a clone of your source (or at least a number of partitions on the destination equal to the number on the source, but storing other data in other partitions of a clone target disk can be risky.)

- Images can use compression, which means they will usually be faster than clones. In almost all backup scenarios, the performance bottleneck is the write speed to the destination, and therefore writing compressed (and therefore less) data to the destination means faster backups. But even if that's not the bottleneck in your case (maybe you're backing up a spinning disk to an SSD?), all else being equal, Incremental image backups shouldn't be any slower than Rapid Delta Clones, and Full image backups shouldn't be any slower than whole partition/disk clones.

- Images allow easy encryption.  By comparison, typically if you clone an encrypted partition, the clone target will only be encrypted if the clone was performed while the source partition was locked. But that has several problems, which is why it's much more common to image/clone encrypted partitions while they're unlocked and therefore readable -- but THAT typically means the clone target will be completely unencrypted. Even if you manually enabled encryption on the target after the fact, the encryption would be wiped out by the next clone performed while the source was unlocked. (UPDATE: A new 7.1 release has changed this behavior. Now, the initial clone of an unlocked source will still result in an unencrypted target, but if the target is manually encrypted after that, subsequent clones will preserve the target's encryption.) If you're curious about the reasons images/clones of locked partitions are uncommon, here goes: First, for an OS partition, you'd have to perform the backup from outside the OS, since the OS has to unlock the partition to run in the first place.  Second, Reflect features like intelligent sector copy and Rapid Delta Clone can't be used on locked partitions; instead, Reflect has to capture every sector on the source.  That's because encryption writes data to every sector in the partition, and while the partition is locked, Reflect can't tell which sectors contain meaningful data and which are just scrambled for security.  This in turn means both clone and image backups take much longer, and image backups will be far larger as well, both because the image contains every sector on the partition, even those that are empty when viewed unencrypted, AND because encrypted data doesn't allow any meaningful compression savings.)

- If you clone to an internal disk, some PCs seem to automatically put newly detected bootable disks at the TOP of their boot order, which means that when you next reboot after an initial clone, your system might boot from your DESTINATION disk.  You may not realize that right away since after all it's an identical copy, but Reflect and its definition file won't be fooled, so if you re-ran your original clone job later, you could end up overwriting your destination disk (where you'd been making changes) with the contents of your source disk that had been untouched, thereby erasing everything that you'd done since that initial clone.  Admittedly, you'd get some warning that something was amiss since Reflect wouldn't start a job that would overwrite the disk Windows booted from while Windows was running, but this risk doesn't exist at all with image backups.

The main benefits of clone operations are:
- If you're migrating to a new drive, it's faster and simpler to perform a clone.  With images, you'd have to capture the image to some third location, then restore that image to the target drive.  But this is a one-off case rather than a general backup case.

- A clone gives you an "always-ready spare".  If your normal disk had a complete hardware failure, you would be able to just install the clone drive internally (if it wasn't already) and then immediately boot from it.  By comparison, if you'd been doing image backups, you'd have to get some other new drive and then restore the image onto it, which requires more time and more hardware.

Edited 10 June 2018 3:25 PM by jphughan
xpac5896
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Thank you for for the information. It's refreshing to see a simple down to earth answer to a question instead of the geek talk you sometimes get. Never realized the differences of clone versus imaging. Basically I like to keep things simple, there's plenty of complexity to go around so I myself like to clone. Granted, the clone itself is a point in time but I do it once a week so the time frame is miniscule and programs will update themselves if there had been an update after the clone.
I just have a plain home computer with nothing but programs on the primary drive, everything else is kept externally but I don't want to lose any of the programs I've invested in and I want to spend as little time to get back up and running should there be a problem like this last Windows update which completely screwed up everything. Luckily I was able to use a restore point to take it back to the last build rather than have to do a reverse clone but at least I had the clone as a backup.
Thanks again for your help and I hope you and yours have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 
jphughan
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You're very welcome, and you have a wonderful Christmas and New Year's as well! Smile

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