Difficulty performing a restore of the Factory Reset Partition


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Steven Leiden
Steven Leiden
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I’ve had a good reason to completely erase the hard drive in my Toshiba a laptop. (I’d like to donate the laptop.)

Now I’d like to restore the Recovery partition containing the Factory Reset (get Windows 8.1 back). I have the backup on a USB drive and can access it. I can select restore and open the destination drive and then copy the Factory Reset Partition to the destination drive. At this point though, I cannot get to the spot on the panel where I think “finish” or whatever performs the restore. I cannot move it to the right or up far enough to do this. Does anyone know how I can get there? I’m using Macrium Home free version 7.0.

Thanks for any help
Steve

jphughan
jphughan
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It sounds like your Rescue Media is locked to 640x480.  This happens on some systems for different reasons; the two causes seem to be a not-fully-compliant implementation of the UEFI spec in the affected system's firmware, and a bug in WinPE 10 1607 that didn't exist on older releases.  It may have been fixed on newer releases, but even if that's the cause of your system's issue, Reflect doesn't support those yet.

The easiest workaround is probably to boot the Rescue Media in Legacy BIOS mode, since this issue only occurs when booting in UEFI mode.  That might require a temporary BIOS change to enable Legacy booting, but it's perfectly fine to do that just long enough to boot your Rescue Media and run the restore.  After that, switch the system back to UEFI mode and make sure the factory reset partition works.

If this were a longer-term need, the best available workaround at the moment is to try building Rescue Media with WinPE 5 or as a last resort WinPE 4.  Most systems that have this problem on WinPE 10 work normally on at least one of those alternate versions​.  WinPE 5 has almost everything from WinPE 10 anyway except support for unlocking the newer BitLocker encryption scheme, but WinPE 4 lacks USB 3.0 support, which can be problematic.  But again, if you just need this for a one-off operation before you get rid of this PC, try the Legacy mode boot method above. Smile
Edited 14 November 2017 8:32 PM by jphughan
jphughan
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Another option if you're on Windows 8.1 or newer is to use the "Reset This PC" functionality built into Windows itself, which is expressly intended for this purpose of giving the PC away: https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/reset-windows-10-pc

If you've upgraded to Win10, there isn't really a reason to ​​roll the system back to 8.1 prior to donating it.  The recipient can certainly do that if they want, but you may as well leave Win10 there as an indicator that this system has a Win10 license associated with it.  You'd also be sparing the recipient a ton of time spent downloading all of the Windows and other Microsoft updates that have been released since that factory image was created. Wink
Edited 14 November 2017 8:42 PM by jphughan
Steven Leiden
Steven Leiden
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Hi jphughan

Your suspicion was right on. I saw a posting on the screen size but didn't put 2+2 together. Looks like when the hard disk was completely overwritten some basic SW must have been destroyed cause I couldn't initiate a factory restore no matter what function key I pressed. So I'm restoring the entire C drive and the sundry small partitions along side. I'll see if this enables me to get back to the Factory setting.

Thanks again,
Steve

jphughan
jphughan
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Different vendors implement their proprietary restore features differently, but sometimes it literally hard-codes something like, "Boot partition 4 of the hard drive", in which case it won't work if the factory partition is no longer Partition 4.  I have no idea how Toshiba does theirs.  But as I mentioned in my second post, worst case you could always just restore your full image of the system and then run Reset This PC to wipe all of your personal data and applications while preserving the Windows OS itself.

Steven Leiden
Steven Leiden
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I appreciate your comment on Windows 10 and although I'm in the process of doing that using Macrium, due to very poor performance by a repeater I had in my network, the Windows 10 updates eventually got all messed up and the OS became very unstable. That's why I'm going back to Windows 8.1.

Steve

jphughan
jphughan
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Wow, network performance shouldn't have affected Windows updates; the file would have either downloaded or not, and Windows verifies updates with Microsoft before installing them.  At any rate, if you get stuck, you can always download vanilla Windows 10 media straight from Microsoft here, which is likely to include all of the necessary drivers for that laptop anyway if it shipped with 8.1.  Or you can download 8.1 media here, although the driver completeness without extra effort on your end in that case would be less certain.

GO

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