Clone Failed


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john West
john West
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I have just carried out a Clone which has failed and I now get the error message NTLDR is missing - please advise how to get my system back ??

Rgds
John


jphughan
jphughan
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Are both disks internal?  If so, it sounds like your system might now be trying to boot from the clone target that has the failed clone, rather than the original source.  Go into your BIOS and change your boot order to put the correct drive at the top of the BIOS and you should be fine.
jphughan
jphughan
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Just as an additional note, this scenario of your system potentially switching to another boot device after a clone operation raises an even more hazardous condition.  You might actually have ended up worse off in the longer term if the clone had succeeded, since in that case your system might have started booting from the target drive without you even realizing it.  In that case, running that same clone job again in the future could have caused your original source to overwrite your target that you'd been running from since the first job, thereby causing you to lose everything since your original clone job.  Technically you would have gotten some indication that something was amiss because Reflect would have prompted you to restart in order to run that job since you can't overwrite the partition containing the running Windows environment while Windows is running from it, but even that warning might have been easy to dismiss.

The bottom line is ​​that when cloning a system disk to another internal disk, after running the first job that makes that target bootable, you definitely want to check your boot order and maybe even disable/remove the target from the boot list entirely if your system supports that.  If you can't disable/remove it, then put it at the bottom of the list, and from that point on the boot order should be maintained even as subsequent clone jobs run -- but verify that.  It seems unwise to move newly discovered devices to the top of the boot order as seems to have happened here, but if that's something your system does, you'll have to deal with it.

​​One alternative you may prefer is to use a USB enclosure or (for even easier access) a USB drive dock instead.  In this scenario, Windows will never boot from your clone target while it's connected via USB, but if you ever needed to use it, you'd just need to remove it from the enclosure/dock and install it internally, and then you'll be up and running.

Edited 13 November 2017 8:38 PM by jphughan
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