Cloning query


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JohnF
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I want to clone from a ssd drive to a hd. The ssd drive has 3 fat32 small partitions plus a large partition which is my c: drive with W10 on it.
My aim is to have a dual boot system. Should I use the 'clone this disk' option or restore the image backup for the c: drive to the hard drive? 
Any pitfalls in my idea?
TIA
John
JohnF
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OK, I have cloned from my c: drive ssd disk to a hd. 
How now do I add the new copy to boot in the Recovery Menu at bootup?
I reran the add recovery option but the copy was not added to the boot list.
Any ideas please?
Thank you
Richard V.
Richard V.
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First of all, for cloning purposes, it is important to distinguish between drives and partitions.  Although "C:" is called a "drive letter", it is not really a drive in the same sense that an SSD or HDD is a drive.  In fact, it is just one logical partition on any HDD or SSD.  So-called "drive letters" are assigned by the Windows operating system to some, but not all, partitions on formatted physical drives.  Other partitions without any assigned "drive letter" (system reserved partitions) are essential to your system's start-up process.  Furthermore, just to add to the confusion, "drive letter" assignments may change when a multi-boot set-up is booted to a different Windows OS or WinPE rescue environment.

To achieve a bootable result, you need to clone the entire physical source drive's contents (i.e., all of its partitions regardless of whether they have any assigned "drive letters") to the physical target drive.  Having done that, it may be necessary in some cases, especially if the replacement drive was not connected on the same internal port, to run the Reflect "Fix Windows Boot Problems" utility in its WinPE rescue environment and/or modify system boot order settings.  (To avoid confusion, it's generally not wise to boot with both the original and the clone left in place at the same time.)  In addition, check Reflect's Default Settings - Advanced tab to ensure that the Macrium Reflect PE Files entry has been set correctly for the current location.  If that needs to be reset, it may also be necessary to remove any existing Reflect rescue boot option, rebuild the WinPE rescue set-up on the newly cloned HDD, and then re-add it to the system menu Boot Configuration Data (BCD) store.



Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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Edited 21 February 2017 4:50 AM by Arvy
JohnF
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Thank you Richard for your comprehensive reply.  The drive I want to clone is a ssd drive as above.
It has Windows 10 Home on it which I want to clone to a harddrive. Are you saying I should 'copy' all of the partitions on the ssd drive to the hard drive? If so, is there anything I will need to do to the MBR to get the hard drive to boot?
Thank you again.
John





Richard V.
Richard V.
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The answer to your question is to be found in examining your own intentions.  By definition, however, a "clone" is a complete and exact replica of the original, often for purposes of replacement.  So yes, assuming that you want to create a bootable replica of the original SSD on the HDD, then as I said above, you would 'clone the entire physical source drive's contents (i.e., all of its partitions regardless of whether they have any assigned "drive letters") to the physical target drive.'

What is not entirely clear is what you mean when you say that your "aim is to have a dual boot system" followed by a discussion about including the Reflect rescue option in your system boot menu.  It's not necessary to clone anything at all if your only purpose is to include Reflect's WinPE rescue option as a selectable item in your system's boot menu.  The required WinPE boot image (boot.wim file) can reside on the same drive as your regular Windows OS working environment and/or on independently bootable media.  If, on the other hand, your intention is to have two identical Windows OS installations available on both drives at once for boot menu selection, I would simply advise you against doing that.

Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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Edited 21 February 2017 12:40 PM by Arvy
JohnF
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Hi Richard
Once I have cloned or copied the source drive (ssd) to my harddrive I intend to uninstall much of the applications on that drive to use it as a test bed for an application I beta test.
That is why I need a menu to be able to boot into either OS. It seems that the Macrium Recover Menu can do that without resorting to using BCD.
Am I thinking this incorrectly?
Thanks again
John


Richard V.
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A Boot Configuration Data (BCD) store is what contains the information that is used during your system's start-up process to display a menu for any multi-boot set-up that you might create.  A single BCD can include data for selecting and booting Windows OSes and WinPE options located in multiple partitions on several drives.  Each drive in the system's boot order set-up can have its own BCD, again including multiple boot options.  In other word, there are possibilities for accomplishing almost anything you might want.  The Reflect WinPE boot option, however, is just one option and not a substitute for the required BCD multi-boot information.



Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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JohnF
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Richard
I assume then you would not recommend I use the Recovery Menu to provide two bootable OSs and the Recovery option? 
John
Richard V.
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It's two entirely separate issues, John.  The Reflect recovery option can be included in any boot menu (BCD store) regardless of whether or not you create a HDD clone (entire or partial) of your SSD without affecting the regular Windows OS working environment in any way.  I was cautioning only against the potential for confusion that can arise from having two identical Windows OS installations available for booting on two drives at the same time.  There's no problem at all with having multiple recovery boot options and, in fact, independently bootable recovery media is highly recommended in case of disastrous drive failure.

As for your experimentation with trial installations, have you considered virtual machine (VM) possibilities?  Just a thought, but it might suit your purposes better with less "hassle" in the long run.  In any case, it's entirely up to you to decide what you want to do and how you want to do it.  I don't necessarily understand as you do all of the factors involved in your particular circumstances.

Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
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JohnF
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Richard
I have managed to clone the SSD drive to my HD and it is booting fine.  I am now in the process of uninstalling many of the applications I do not need for my 'test bed'.
In the Recovery Menu the two OSs are both shown as Windows 10 ( 1 on Volume 4 and 1 on Volume 8.
In the Recovery Menu edit window the box where I want to edit the volume name is greyed out.  I want to rename the volumes to something more meaningful.
Is there a way to do that?
Thanks again for your advice.
John

Richard V.
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JohnF - 21 February 2017 6:02 PM
Richard
I have managed to clone the SSD drive to my HD and it is booting fine.  I am now in the process of uninstalling many of the applications I do not need for my 'test bed'.
In the Recovery Menu the two OSs are both shown as Windows 10 ( 1 on Volume 4 and 1 on Volume 8.
In the Recovery Menu edit window the box where I want to edit the volume name is greyed out.  I want to rename the volumes to something more meaningful.
Is there a way to do that?
Thanks again for your advice.
John


The names for drive partitions (a.k.a. "volumes") are not determined by the boot menu (BCD store) option entries but are managed as a property of the partitions themselves.  See screen shot below.  If, on the other hand, you want to modify the description for one of the boot menu option entries, see this MS Community article.

http://forum.macrium.com/uploads/images/5d759ba6-0bc0-4120-97e0-f95b.png


Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
https://forum.macrium.com/uploads/images/afc5d4fe-5d25-4e25-be94-185e.png

Edited 21 February 2017 6:54 PM by Arvy
JohnF
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I now have two versions of Windows 10 I can boot into both working fine.
Menu names have been edited so thank you again Richard for your advice and patience.
John

Richard V.
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You're welcome. Happy to help.  Just be careful about those alternating "C: drives" and any applications that may be configured to rely on "drive letter" assignments for various operations -- such as their input/output or file saving, for example.


Regards, Richard V. ("Arvy")
https://forum.macrium.com/uploads/images/afc5d4fe-5d25-4e25-be94-185e.png

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