Macrium Support Forum

...more on REDEPLOY

https://forum.macrium.com/Topic9951.aspx

By Diazruanova - 16 November 2016 3:01 PM

Hi,

At last I am replacing my old Motherboard and CPU (Intel H55 Chipset) for a more recent MoBo and CPU (Intel Z97 Chipset).
The rest of the hardware remains the same, case included, so my rig will consist, among other stuff, of the following:

New MoBo and CPU (Intel Z97 Chipset)
One SATA SSD (C. drive) containing Windows 10Home x64
One SATA 7200 rpm HD (D: drive) on which I have among other stuff a recent Macrium Image of the complete SSD (C.drive)
One Optical drive (HL-DT-ST DVDRAM) and...
One USB device containing Windows PE 10.0 Rescue Media


After putting together everything and double checking all connections, I will select to boot from the USB device containing Windows PE 10.0 Rescue Media and restore the image located in D: onto  the  SSD  drive overwriting all the partitions included of course,  the C: one with the Windows 10 operating system.

After the restore operation finishes and before rebooting, I will use the "Redeploy Restored Image to new hardware" option (restore tab) and insert the DVD which comes along with the new Motherboard, directing Redeploy to it so it can find the necessary NEW drivers for the new Z97 Chipset.  After redeploy finishes, then I´ll reboot the PC and hopefully, it will boot fine with the new MoBo and CPU. ...so far so good!

But I have a couple of questions:
  • Is it  MANDATORY  to restore the recently created Image from D: to C: before the redeploy process?
  • Can´t I simply boot from the  Windows PE rescue USB and just go to the redeploy option and skip the image restore process completely?
I don´t understand why should I restore the image located on D:  if I am NOT replacing my SSD ( C: )  for a new one and also, if I just recently created the image!

...isn´t the same exact data contained on the SSD ( C: )  the one that is copied to the Macrium image on D: that I just created minutes ago? 
...so what is the purpose of doing the restore process IF everything on the SSD ( C: ) will remain the same as if I never did it (the restore process)?

Thank you very much for your understanding and hopefully, despite my very limited experience BUT with your support, I will be able to perform this procedure without many problems.

Greetings







By Froggie - 16 November 2016 3:29 PM

Don't forget to run the "Remove license" feature in Reflect (Help/Remove License) following the making your final image... and make sure you have your License # to re-activate it on the new machine.
By Diazruanova - 16 November 2016 3:38 PM

Froggie - 16 November 2016 3:29 PM
Don't forget to run the "Remove license" feature in Reflect (Help/Remove License) following the making your final image... and make sure you have your License # to re-activate it on the new machine.

Thanks Froggie for the tip, I´ll do that.
Still waiting for the replies to my questions.  ;-)
By Froggie - 16 November 2016 5:24 PM

None of us really know the "guts" of the reDeploy process but yes, you are right, that the image on the surface of the SSD is exactly as it would be following a restore which appears unnecessary.  BUT, reDeploy may use some sort of semiphore (digital flag) to determine how to proceed.  That flag may only be present following a restoration operation.

Hopefully Nick, Stephen, et al will be able to provide an answer for you.
By Nick - 16 November 2016 5:37 PM

Hi Diazruanova

Thanks for posting.

Can´t I simply boot from the Windows PE rescue USB and just go to the redeploy option and skip the image restore process completely?


Yes  you can. There's no need to restore, you can just run ReDeploy on your existing file system.
By Diazruanova - 16 November 2016 7:03 PM

Thanks a lot Froggie and Nick,

You are very kind and certainly my questions were answered!

Greetings from central Mexico to both of you     Wink


By Drac144 - 16 November 2016 9:31 PM

Please consider the following:  When replacing your motherboard you are changing ALL your device interfaces (such as USB, and possibly sound and graphics, etc.)  The Redeploy will only update the CPU related drivers.  You may still have to (or at least want to) update other drivers to those that are supplied with your new MoBo.  If your current drivers are fairly generic, they may work with your new MoBo, but maybe not as well as the drivers supplied with your new MoBo. 
By Diazruanova - 17 November 2016 12:32 AM

Thanks Drac144,

I am aware of it, but fortunately, the other devices like the graphics card (Nvidia Geforce GT730), the audio card and the Wi-Fi receiver, are not changed and their drivers are up to date, but anyway, I am pretty sure that something will pop out, it always do Smile

Regards



By Diazruanova - 21 November 2016 6:18 PM

Here it is an update on what happened after replacing my new Motherboard and CPU:

After putting together everything, the moment of truth arrived and I turned ON my PC waiting to enter the new BIOS and so be able to BOOT from the USB flash drive containing the Macrium Windows PE 10.0 Rescue Media, so I could apply the REDEPLOY procedure, BUT unfortunately (or should I say fortunately?)  I missed the F2 keystroke to enter the new BIOS set-up.

I was already waiting for a BSOD or some weird behavior, but to my surprise, the Windows 10 OS, made some preparations asking to wait and not to turn OFF the PC and after one minute or so, it started fine!!!.

I immediately went to Device Manager to see what SATA, AHCI driver was enabled and working and I discovered that Windows automatically installed the
generic Microsoft SATA, AHCI controller replacing the old Intel H55 one, so there was NO need to use Macrium redeploy at all, I simply ran the Motherboard DVD and installed all the drivers, re-started the PC and everything is running fine, included the re-activation of Windows 10 Home, but that is another story!

Greetings


By Drac144 - 21 November 2016 9:00 PM

Thanks for the update.  You should buy a lottery ticket - you seem to be very lucky! Tongue
Apparently your old CPU drivers were close enough to the new ones that they worked well enough for the system to run and take care of the update. 

By Diazruanova - 21 November 2016 11:21 PM

Drac144 - 21 November 2016 9:00 PM
Thanks for the update.  You should buy a lottery ticket - you seem to be very lucky! Tongue
Apparently your old CPU drivers were close enough to the new ones that they worked well enough for the system to run and take care of the update. 


Well, not that close, because the CPU was launched in Sept - 2009,  the H55 Chipset  in Jan 2010 and I bought the PC in Jun 2010 so just make the numbers (6+ yrs), but talking about numbers, you´ll have to excuse me because I have to run, I´m in a hurry to buy a lottery ticket  Wink
By Froggie - 22 November 2016 12:49 AM

Drac144 - 21 November 2016 9:00 PM
Thanks for the update.  You should buy a lottery ticket - you seem to be very lucky! Tongue
Apparently your old CPU drivers were close enough to the new ones that they worked well enough for the system to run and take care of the update. 


Drac,  I don't think that's the case.  When BOOTing Windows and its sees new hardware, it'll first go through its resident "known" drivers to see if it has a match.  W7 had a dirth of resident drivers, W8+ was a little better but W10 contains a ton of resident drivers that most likely contained what the OP needed for his new rig.
By Diazruanova - 22 November 2016 2:19 AM

Froggie - 22 November 2016 12:49 AM
Drac144 - 21 November 2016 9:00 PM
Thanks for the update.  You should buy a lottery ticket - you seem to be very lucky! Tongue
Apparently your old CPU drivers were close enough to the new ones that they worked well enough for the system to run and take care of the update. 


Drac,  I don't think that's the case.  When BOOTing Windows and its sees new hardware, it'll first go through its resident "known" drivers to see if it has a match.  W7 had a dirth of resident drivers, W8+ was a little better but W10 contains a ton of resident drivers that most likely contained what the OP needed for his new rig.

I agree, in fact before doing the MoBo swap I did a little reading on the net and I found some users on various forums that got good results with Win 10  by just making the hardware change without changing drivers or redeploying (some of them simply UN-installed SATA-AHCI Intel drivers before), but nonetheless, I prepared my self for the worst scenario, fortunately the process was painless, but not so re-activating Windows 10 which turned out to be a torture: it was a long and very complicated live chat with an Indian Microsoft on line technician (he/she did not even understand very well English) who "took remote control of my computer" messing with my OS installation to the point that I had to restore a previously created image!!!  ...he (or she), ruined my windows installation to the point, that after a couple of hours, he gave up and wanted me, to install Windows 10 from scratch defying completely my original intention to keep everything UNTOUCHED  (the only reason for me, to use Macrium redeploy).

After I finished the chat, sweating in terror just by the idea of reinstalling Windows 10 from scratch and reinstalling ALL my programs, I restored the most recent Macrium image (with all the new drivers already in place) and I tried to figure out by myself how to re-activate my Windows copy.

Originally I upgraded for free from a Windows 7 Home installation which I bought from a retail computer store in its box, so I copied and pasted the original windows 7 key into the Update & Security>Activation>Change Product Key option and voila, it got activated instantly.

Greetings.


By Drac144 - 22 November 2016 9:40 PM

So if Windows will automatically handle the updating of CPU drivers, and that is what Redeploy does, then what is the advantage of having Redeploy?  While it is free in V6 we had to pay for it in V5.  Also, many people who updated hardware could not get their system working until they did Redeploy so it must have some functionality that Windows doesn't.  Confusing.
By Seekforever - 23 November 2016 3:05 PM

My limited understanding of Redploy is that it primarily provides workable mass-storage drives and maybe some video driver that will get any system booted up. Once running the proper and missing drivers can be loaded. I don't know the relative timeline between the end of MR V5 and W10 if W10 is much improved in fixing up wrong drivers on boot.