Macrium Support Forum

Adding drivers to Rescue Media Manually

https://forum.macrium.com/Topic27066.aspx

By bluekabylake - 15 December 2018 6:05 AM

I am trying to add drivers to my rescue media to compatibility reasons. Specifically I wish to add some Intel RAID drivers as some of our devices require such a driver. I assume copying the driver files to the "C:\boot\macrium\drivers\Disk" would allow the creation process to automatically detect the drivers but that doesn't seem to be the case. 

I have already referenced this article about the topic and am still having issues...

Macrium has no problem detecting the hardware on my current machine which I am using to create the rescue media but I don't seem to find the ability to add other drivers not needed for my current PC.

 
By jphughan - 15 December 2018 6:03 PM

That window lists the devices on that actual PC. It does not list all of the drivers in the Drivers folder. However, if you have a suitable driver in the location you mentioned, it will still get copied into Rescue Media you build, and the Rescue Media should load it automatically when booted on a system that has that RAID device. Technically you can add drivers directly to Rescue Media after it’s been built too (if you’re using USB) by just copying the files directly to that Drivers folder on the USB device, but copying them to the corresponding folder on your hard drive will ensure that all Rescue Media built on that PC will include that driver.
By bluekabylake - 15 December 2018 6:24 PM

jphughan - 15 December 2018 6:03 PM
That window lists the devices on that actual PC. It does not list all of the drivers in the Drivers folder. However, if you have a suitable driver in the location you mentioned, it will still get copied into Rescue Media you build, and the Rescue Media should load it automatically when booted on a system that has that RAID device. Technically you can add drivers directly to Rescue Media after it’s been built too (if you’re using USB) by just copying the files directly to that Drivers folder on the USB device, but copying them to the corresponding folder on your hard drive will ensure that all Rescue Media built on that PC will include that driver.

Thnx for the clarification...

Once I have created the rescue media ISO, I assume it's safe to delete the "boot" folder from my C: drive?
By jphughan - 15 December 2018 6:53 PM

If you don’t intend to use the recovery boot menu option, you can, but it’ll get created again anyway if you ever build Rescue Media again, such as after a Reflect update.
By bluekabylake - 16 December 2018 10:52 AM

jphughan - 15 December 2018 6:53 PM
If you don’t intend to use the recovery boot menu option, you can, but it’ll get created again anyway if you ever build Rescue Media again, such as after a Reflect update.

Good to know...Thnx
By MGKAOK - 19 February 2019 6:04 AM

I'm using an SD card to store my image files. I created a boot disk and it boots OK. However, the SD drive does not show.

I can work around this by using a USB adapter for the micro SD card but . . .

Finally, how safe is it to go ahead and attempt an unneeded restore just to test Macrium and the image file? What could go wrong?

Thanks.
By jphughan - 19 February 2019 3:21 PM

Mike Kassis - 19 February 2019 6:04 AM
I'm using an SD card to store my image files. I created a boot disk and it boots OK. However, the SD drive does not show.

I can work around this by using a USB adapter for the micro SD card but . . .

Finally, how safe is it to go ahead and attempt an unneeded restore just to test Macrium and the image file? What could go wrong?

Thanks.

I've never tried to add drivers for card readers, but if the Rescue Media wizard doesn't pay attention to those, that might be worth a Wish List thread to request that support.  In the meantime, if you have a driver package for the built-in card reader, you can try manually copying the driver to C:\Boot\Macrium\Drivers\Disk\[New folder named whatever you want] so that it gets included in future Rescue Media builds, or if you're using a Rescue Media flash drive, for faster testing purposes could copy it straight to \Drivers\Disk on the Rescue Media.  If you don't have a driver package, I found a utility a while ago called Double Driver that can enumerate all of the devices in your system and allows you to extract driver packages for them right out of the host OS, so you can try using that to export a suitable driver package.

In terms of the test restore, the worst possible scenario I guess would be that you only have one backup file, and it turns out to be damaged, which causes the restore to fail partway through, thereby leaving you with an unbootable system that no longer contains any usable data, and no usable data in your backup either.  But I consider that possibility sufficiently unlikely that the benefits of a test restore outweigh them.  If you want to take extra precautions, create a new Full backup specifically for this purpose (so that you're not stuck with only one backup), and if you want to be extra careful, you can check the "Verify backup before restoring" checkbox at the last step of the restore wizard so that Reflect won't touch your internal disk until it checks the entire backup file it's about to restore.  But that will significantly extend your overall restore time, especially in a scenario like this where you'll be restoring a backup that was created very recently, which means that thanks to Reflect's Rapid Delta Restore feature, the restore itself will probably only take a few minutes.
By MGKAOK - 19 February 2019 3:34 PM

jphughan - 19 February 2019 3:21 PM
Mike Kassis - 19 February 2019 6:04 AM
I'm using an SD card to store my image files. I created a boot disk and it boots OK. However, the SD drive does not show.

I can work around this by using a USB adapter for the micro SD card but . . .

Finally, how safe is it to go ahead and attempt an unneeded restore just to test Macrium and the image file? What could go wrong?

Thanks.

I've never tried to add drivers for card readers, but if the Rescue Media wizard doesn't pay attention to those, that might be worth a Wish List thread to request that support.  In the meantime, if you have a driver package for the built-in card reader, you can try manually copying the driver to C:\Boot\Macrium\Drivers\Disk\[New folder named whatever you want] so that it gets included in future Rescue Media builds, or if you're using a Rescue Media flash drive, for faster testing purposes could copy it straight to \Drivers\Disk on the Rescue Media.  If you don't have a driver package, I found a utility a while ago called Double Driver that can enumerate all of the devices in your system and allows you to extract driver packages for them right out of the host OS, so you can try using that to export a suitable driver package.

In terms of the test restore, the worst possible scenario I guess would be that you only have one backup file, and it turns out to be damaged, which causes the restore to fail partway through, thereby leaving you with an unbootable system that no longer contains any usable data, and no usable data in your backup either.  But I consider that possibility sufficiently unlikely that the benefits of a test restore outweigh them.  If you want to take extra precautions, create a new Full backup specifically for this purpose (so that you're not stuck with only one backup), and if you want to be extra careful, you can check the "Verify backup before restoring" checkbox at the last step of the restore wizard so that Reflect won't touch your internal disk until it checks the entire backup file it's about to restore.  But that will significantly extend your overall restore time, especially in a scenario like this where you'll be restoring a backup that was created very recently, which means that thanks to Reflect's Rapid Delta Restore feature, the restore itself will probably only take a few minutes.


By MGKAOK - 19 February 2019 3:35 PM

jphughan - 19 February 2019 3:21 PM
Mike Kassis - 19 February 2019 6:04 AM
I'm using an SD card to store my image files. I created a boot disk and it boots OK. However, the SD drive does not show.

I can work around this by using a USB adapter for the micro SD card but . . .

Finally, how safe is it to go ahead and attempt an unneeded restore just to test Macrium and the image file? What could go wrong?

Thanks.

I've never tried to add drivers for card readers, but if the Rescue Media wizard doesn't pay attention to those, that might be worth a Wish List thread to request that support.  In the meantime, if you have a driver package for the built-in card reader, you can try manually copying the driver to C:\Boot\Macrium\Drivers\Disk\[New folder named whatever you want] so that it gets included in future Rescue Media builds, or if you're using a Rescue Media flash drive, for faster testing purposes could copy it straight to \Drivers\Disk on the Rescue Media.  If you don't have a driver package, I found a utility a while ago called Double Driver that can enumerate all of the devices in your system and allows you to extract driver packages for them right out of the host OS, so you can try using that to export a suitable driver package.

In terms of the test restore, the worst possible scenario I guess would be that you only have one backup file, and it turns out to be damaged, which causes the restore to fail partway through, thereby leaving you with an unbootable system that no longer contains any usable data, and no usable data in your backup either.  But I consider that possibility sufficiently unlikely that the benefits of a test restore outweigh them.  If you want to take extra precautions, create a new Full backup specifically for this purpose (so that you're not stuck with only one backup), and if you want to be extra careful, you can check the "Verify backup before restoring" checkbox at the last step of the restore wizard so that Reflect won't touch your internal disk until it checks the entire backup file it's about to restore.  But that will significantly extend your overall restore time, especially in a scenario like this where you'll be restoring a backup that was created very recently, which means that thanks to Reflect's Rapid Delta Restore feature, the restore itself will probably only take a few minutes.

Super. Thanks so much
By stanshow - 19 February 2019 11:27 PM

jphughan - 15 December 2018 6:03 PM
That window lists the devices on that actual PC. It does not list all of the drivers in the Drivers folder. However, if you have a suitable driver in the location you mentioned, it will still get copied into Rescue Media you build, and the Rescue Media should load it automatically when booted on a system that has that RAID device. Technically you can add drivers directly to Rescue Media after it’s been built too (if you’re using USB) by just copying the files directly to that Drivers folder on the USB device, but copying them to the corresponding folder on your hard drive will ensure that all Rescue Media built on that PC will include that driver.

Thanks jphughan, this helped me on a slightly different issue that you might want to add to your notes should someone else have similar problems.

I've recently built a new workstation running a Ryzen 2700X  on an Asus Crosshair VII Hero motherboard.  I upgraded to the latest BIOS as of this writing for the board (ver. 1201), and installed Windows 10 setting up two NVMe drives in RAID 0 for the OS, and another 4 SATA drives in RAID 10 for data.  Installing windows required adding at install time three additional drivers - RCBOTTOM, RCRAID, and RCCFG.  Per the instructions from Asus, the individual physical drives showed until I loaded RCBOTTOM, then the raid volumes as configured in BIOS appeared as I loaded RCRAID.

Following Asus instructions, Windows 10 installed fine and my various RAID volumes were all accessible as needed.  I installed Reflect and built Rescue Media using a USB stick.  When I booted from the drive, none of my drives (physical or raid virtual) would show as either source or destination. 

While trying to figure out what was going on, I noticed that only RCBOTTOM was listed in the list of drivers included in the Rescue Media build.  None of the other drivers that I installed manually during Windows installation were listed. For some reason or another, it seems that the Rescue Media build process is not picking up the RCRAID driver, which is needed to see the configured RAID volumes.

I was having a hard time finding how to add drivers manually until I found this thread (easy once you know how).  I added the RCRAID folder from the drivers I used during Windows install to the disk drivers area on the Macrium c:\boot directories.  Rebuilt the Rescue Media to a USB stick, and gave it a try.  My RAID volumes all show as expected, and I was able to copy a drive image of my system volume over to my data volume.

I don't know if this will apply to other using AMD raid drivers, but though I'd document it here should others have similar issues.   

By jphughan - 20 February 2019 12:20 AM

Great info!  I remember reading another thread here about AMD RAID drivers being problematic, but unfortunately I can't remember the details.  I also found this guide from AMD that (further) confirms that all 3 drivers are expected to be loaded to work with RAID virtual disks properly and offers step-by-step instructions for doing that during a Windows 10 installation for anyone who might need them.  According to that document, it appears that the RCCFG device is classified as a System Device rather than a Storage Controller, which might explain why the Rescue Media wizard is ignoring that device, although if both RCBOTTOM and RCRAID are both treated as storage controllers, I'm not sure why the wizard would have picked up only one in your case. I do however remember a case here where the Rescue Media wizard didn't incorporate an Intel server RAID controller driver because it had determined that WinPE already contained a compatible driver, and although that built-in driver did load for that device (i.e. Reflect did not indicate any "unsupported devices" in the Rescue environment), it didn't actually work because no disks attached to the RAID controller were displayed. I helped that user manually add a driver from Intel to their Rescue Media build to resolve that issue, so perhaps this is a similar case.

Anyhow, even though you've worked around your issue at this point, you might want to consider sending a support ticket to Macrium to advise them of this issue and your current workaround in case they can update the Rescue Media wizard to grab all of the necessary drivers automatically.  You can do that by going to helpdesk.macrium.com and just clicking "New support ticket" under the login fields, because I don't think forum accounts are synced over to the helpdesk system.
By MGKAOK - 20 February 2019 1:18 AM

jphughan - 19 February 2019 3:21 PM
Mike Kassis - 19 February 2019 6:04 AM
I'm using an SD card to store my image files. I created a boot disk and it boots OK. However, the SD drive does not show.

I can work around this by using a USB adapter for the micro SD card but . . .

Finally, how safe is it to go ahead and attempt an unneeded restore just to test Macrium and the image file? What could go wrong?

Thanks.

I've never tried to add drivers for card readers, but if the Rescue Media wizard doesn't pay attention to those, that might be worth a Wish List thread to request that support.  In the meantime, if you have a driver package for the built-in card reader, you can try manually copying the driver to C:\Boot\Macrium\Drivers\Disk\[New folder named whatever you want] so that it gets included in future Rescue Media builds, or if you're using a Rescue Media flash drive, for faster testing purposes could copy it straight to \Drivers\Disk on the Rescue Media.  If you don't have a driver package, I found a utility a while ago called Double Driver that can enumerate all of the devices in your system and allows you to extract driver packages for them right out of the host OS, so you can try using that to export a suitable driver package.

In terms of the test restore, the worst possible scenario I guess would be that you only have one backup file, and it turns out to be damaged, which causes the restore to fail partway through, thereby leaving you with an unbootable system that no longer contains any usable data, and no usable data in your backup either.  But I consider that possibility sufficiently unlikely that the benefits of a test restore outweigh them.  If you want to take extra precautions, create a new Full backup specifically for this purpose (so that you're not stuck with only one backup), and if you want to be extra careful, you can check the "Verify backup before restoring" checkbox at the last step of the restore wizard so that Reflect won't touch your internal disk until it checks the entire backup file it's about to restore.  But that will significantly extend your overall restore time, especially in a scenario like this where you'll be restoring a backup that was created very recently, which means that thanks to Reflect's Rapid Delta Restore feature, the restore itself will probably only take a few minutes.

B A M !  It worked using Double Driver. THANK YOU!
By jphughan - 20 February 2019 4:15 AM

Mike Kassis - 20 February 2019 1:18 AM
B A M !  It worked using Double Driver. THANK YOU!

Excellent!  And similarly to what I recommended to stanshow above, it might be worth submitting a support ticket to Macrium about this to ask them to update the Rescue Media wizard to automatically include drivers for memory card readers, since the Rescue environment can apparently already use them after a driver is manually provided.  Given the capacity and performance of some flash memory cards these days, and the fact that on some laptops they can stay installed full-time without protruding the way a flash drive would, I can see them potentially becoming more attractive as backup destinations, so it would be handy not to have to resort to a manual workaround to make this setup work.