Restoring Two Partitons and Saving a Third


Author
Message
whbecker
whbecker
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 14
I have a two physical hard drives in my system. My working drive is partitioned into C: (Windows) and D: Data.  I run a Macrium image of this drive daily and save it to an external USB drive.  I have three partitions on a secondary physical drive.  I have been periodically using the Rescue Disk to restore a Macrium image of C: and D: to two of the partitions.on the secondary physical drive.  (This, using a dual boot program (EasyBCD) allowed me to boot from either drive physical hard drive.)   The secondary physical drive has a third partition with backup data.  That partition was unaffected by the restore operation.

Recently, I purchased an SSD to replace the Toshiba secondary spinning hard drive and successfully cloned the old drive to the new SSD.  I swapped the SSD into the computer, and all seemed well.  However, when I boot up the Rescue disk and try to restore a Macrium image of C: and D: to the SSD, just like I did with the previous Toshiba spinning drive, I get this warning:


It appears that all my backup data on the R: partition will be deleted!  This warning about the R: partition did not appear with the old spinning drive.  It just warned about the P:, Q: and unlettered partitions.  How can I be sure that I am just restoring the images of the C: and D: partitions and leaving the Backup partition untouched?  Note that I am only selecting the C:,  D: , and unlettered partitions as shown here:


dbminter
dbminter
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 2.6K, Visits: 25K
Hm, I though you couldn't stage multiple restore operations in a row.  I thought it was 1 to 1.  1 restore or backup per operation.  I thought the restore limitation was by design.

whbecker
whbecker
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 14
dbminter - 8 June 2021 9:37 PM
Hm, I though you couldn't stage multiple restore operations in a row.  I thought it was 1 to 1.  1 restore or backup per operation.  I thought the restore limitation was by design.
I'm not sure what you mean by "multiple restore operations in a row".  I'm just restoring a valid Macrium image to a different drive.  This has worked for me for several years.  Only when I switched to the SSD did the issue arise.


dbminter
dbminter
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 2.6K, Visits: 25K
I didn't think it was possible to restore more than 1 partition at a time.  I didn't know you could restore an entire drive in one go.  I never tried it, though, because I always preferred the one partition at a time method.  Less chance of things messing up.

jphughan
jphughan
Macrium Evangelist
Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)Macrium Evangelist (14K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 9.7K, Visits: 63K
The issue here is that the partition "offsets", i.e. their size and positions on disk, are different between the Source and Destination disks.  By default, Reflect restores partitions such that their size and position on disk on the destination matches the source.  The Source and Destination disks in this case have very different capacities, so the scale of the partition layout table is misleading (though that's by necessity because otherwise a small disk might show unusable small partition blocks) but if you look at the sequence and total sizes of the partitions on disk, notice that Partition 1 through 5 on the Source and Destination match.  So those can be restored the normal way without any issues.  But then your Source disk has Partition 6, which is a Windows Recovery partition, whereas Partition 6 on the Destination is your R drive.  So if you choose to restore Source Partition 6, by default it would be restored into space that is partially occupied by the R drive on the Destination, and therefore the R partition would be destroyed -- hence the warning.  The way to restore a partition such that it does NOT maintain the same size and/or position on disk on the Destination as it did on the Source is to drag and drop the source partition onto a desired existing Destination partition or into empty space on the Destination.  The complication here is that your Destination disk is a bit of a mess.  You have three separate Recovery partitions, namely 1, 7, and 8.  The "legacy" location for Recovery partitions is Partition 1.  But since Windows 10 evolved to require larger Recovery partitions over time.  So the new method is to place the Recovery partition directly after the Windows partition, so that if it ever needs to be expanded, Windows can shrink the Windows partition by the desired amount.  But even your Source disk doesn't use that layout.

If i were in your position, I would make sure I had a good image backup of the Destination disk shown in your screenshot, then delete both of the Recovery partitions at the end of the disk, then delete the Q and R drives, then restore the Recovery partition at the end of the Source disk into that space directly after the Windows partition on the destination disk, and finally restore the Q and R drives after that.  That will still leave you with a redundant Recovery partition at the beginning of the disk, but reclaiming that space is a bit more of a chore.  If you're not up for that, then I guess the best solution would be to drag and drop the Recovery partition at the end of the Source disk onto one of the two existing Recovery partitions at the end of the Destination disk.  But you'll have to do that every time you perform a restore operation like this, and you'll still have a non-standard Recovery partition placement, and it's not even clear that any of your three partitions will work after that.  Windows has a BCD entry for Windows Recovery, and it has to know which partition on disk is the Recovery partition.  I have no idea what yours would say at the moment.

@dbminter Yes you can restore entire disks in a single operation, in fact that is the default mode of operation.  What you cannot do is restore to multiple disks or from multiple source images in a single pass.  You've been using Reflect since V4 and have only ever restored one partition at a time?? Blink

Edited 9 June 2021 1:59 AM by jphughan
dbminter
dbminter
Most Valuable Professional
Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)Most Valuable Professional (3.8K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 2.6K, Visits: 25K
I've very rarely ever had to restore anything other than the Windows partition except to move to higher capacity USB HDD drives.  And, yes, I've always restored one partition at a time.  Smile  My experience has been whenever something goes wrong, generally just restoring the Windows partition fixes it.  While that's not the case with EFI setups anymore, it used to be the case.

whbecker
whbecker
New Member
New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)New Member (4 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 14
jphughan - 9 June 2021 1:55 AM
The issue here is that the partition "offsets", i.e. their size and positions on disk, are different between the Source and Destination disks.  By default, Reflect restores partitions such that their size and position on disk on the destination matches the source.  The Source and Destination disks in this case have very different capacities, so the scale of the partition layout table is misleading (though that's by necessity because otherwise a small disk might show unusable small partition blocks) but if you look at the sequence and total sizes of the partitions on disk, notice that Partition 1 through 5 on the Source and Destination match.  So those can be restored the normal way without any issues.  But then your Source disk has Partition 6, which is a Windows Recovery partition, whereas Partition 6 on the Destination is your R drive.  So if you choose to restore Source Partition 6, by default it would be restored into space that is partially occupied by the R drive on the Destination, and therefore the R partition would be destroyed -- hence the warning.  The way to restore a partition such that it does NOT maintain the same size and/or position on disk on the Destination as it did on the Source is to drag and drop the source partition onto a desired existing Destination partition or into empty space on the Destination.  The complication here is that your Destination disk is a bit of a mess.  You have three separate Recovery partitions, namely 1, 7, and 8.  The "legacy" location for Recovery partitions is Partition 1.  But since Windows 10 evolved to require larger Recovery partitions over time.  So the new method is to place the Recovery partition directly after the Windows partition, so that if it ever needs to be expanded, Windows can shrink the Windows partition by the desired amount.  But even your Source disk doesn't use that layout.

If i were in your position, I would make sure I had a good image backup of the Destination disk shown in your screenshot, then delete both of the Recovery partitions at the end of the disk, then delete the Q and R drives, then restore the Recovery partition at the end of the Source disk into that space directly after the Windows partition on the destination disk, and finally restore the Q and R drives after that.  That will still leave you with a redundant Recovery partition at the beginning of the disk, but reclaiming that space is a bit more of a chore.  If you're not up for that, then I guess the best solution would be to drag and drop the Recovery partition at the end of the Source disk onto one of the two existing Recovery partitions at the end of the Destination disk.  But you'll have to do that every time you perform a restore operation like this, and you'll still have a non-standard Recovery partition placement, and it's not even clear that any of your three partitions will work after that.  Windows has a BCD entry for Windows Recovery, and it has to know which partition on disk is the Recovery partition.  I have no idea what yours would say at the moment.

@dbminter Yes you can restore entire disks in a single operation, in fact that is the default mode of operation.  What you cannot do is restore to multiple disks or from multiple source images in a single pass.  You've been using Reflect since V4 and have only ever restored one partition at a time?? Blink

Thanks for your detailed and informative reply.  Clearly, something odd happened when I cloned my old spinning drive to the new SSD. Plus, this desktop is a 4th gen Haswell i7 which originally shipped with Windows 8, so there may well have been mishaps over the years as I did regular updates to reach my present 20H2.  I will educate myself a bit on recovery partitions, but it may make more sense to just use the new SSD as a backup drive and eliminate the option to immediately boot from that drive if I should have a failure of my primary drive. 

GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search