Cloning 250GB disk to 500GB disk


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Ken429
Ken429
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It's always something!  I tried cloning a Samsung EVO 960 M.2 250GB disk to a Crucial MX200 500GB SSD.  All seemed to be Okay until I booted up the Cloned SSD drive and got a new partition showing in File Manager called Local Disk (G).  Reflect also shows the partition - see attachments.  Manage>Disk Management does not show the partition.  Where did I go wrong?  I dragged the NoName partition to the new drive, I then dragged the W10 partition to the new drive and resized it and then I dragged the remaining partition to the free space left on the new drive.  Changed the boot drive in the BIOS to the Crucial SSD and booted windows - no apparent problems.  So...how do I tell whomever to get rid of the G: assigned to the NoName FAT partition?
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NoName_Local Disk.png (16 views, 53.00 KB)
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Ken429
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One other piece of information which may or may not have added to the issue - I converted the Samsung EVO 960 M.2 disk from an MBR format to the GPT format using the program provided by Windows in the recover procedure.  The seemed to work without any issues.
jphughan
jphughan
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You can use diskpart to remove a drive letter assignment, and that FAT32 partition shouldn't have one.  But there's another issue here.  The Unformatted Primary partition is correct for a GPT disk and created automatically at the beginning of the disk, but it's not supposed to be there for disks containing an OS.  It is instead supposed to be located after the EFI partition (that FAT32 partition).  If you want to do that conversion, then follow Macrium's KB article for restoring/cloning MBR to GPT here.

Ken429
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jphughan,
Now I'm even more confused. 
I have another system with a 250GB SSD running Windows 10.  It has four partitions (attachment 2700X).  They are 449MB, 100MB, 16MB and 222.97GB.  Also, the GPT data drives have two different sizes depending on the drive 16MB and 128MB?? 

If I do what the Macrium tutorial says to do I end up with three partitions 200MB, 128MB and the Windows 10 main partition resized to whatever available.  The good part is the Window partition is last so it can be resized.  Could I change the 200MB partition size to 579MB instead of 200MB?

The system I'm screwing around with has the old 250GB drive converted from MBR to GPT with three partitions.  They are 579MB, 231GB (Windows 10 partition) and 547MB.

After I got done the 500GB drive has four partitions 16MB (probably not needed from the DISKPART Clean function), 579MB, 463GB for the resized Windows partition and 547MB.

Windows 10 appears to function normally on all of the above!  Seems like windows has a mind of it's own and sets up partitions of different sizes depending on the devices, time of the year or whatever?  




Help still needed.


jphughan
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You have to understand the purpose of the partitions.  In the screenshot of your SanDisk SSD, the Windows Recovery partition is placed first on disk.  Up until Win10 2004, clean installs put the Recovery partition there.  Now the Recovery partition is placed after the C drive because in this era of Windows upgrades every 6 months, Microsoft realized they needed to be able to upsize that Recovery partition.  Having it at the beginning of the disk didn't allow that.  But when it's right after the C partition, if it ever needs to be extended, they can just shrink the C partition by the additional required amount.  But that does mean that if you want to resize the Windows partition, you need to stage that as part of a clone/restore operation, not do it later.  Reflect allows you to do that.

The small FAT32 partition is the ESP, or EFI System Partition.  Microsoft's default size for that is 100 MB, as seen on your SanDisk SSD, but some PC vendors make it larger on the builds they create at the factory.  I have no idea why, especially given that as you can see on your Crucial SSD where that partition is much larger, it still only has about 27 MB in use.

As for the 16 MB Unformatted partition, that is the MSR partition, or Microsoft Reserved partition.  It used to be 128 MB, but more recently Microsoft defaulted it to 16 MB.  Note that on your SanDisk SSD, that partition is located just AFTER the EFI System Partition.  That is correct placement for a disk containing a Windows OS.  For all other GPT disks, the correct placement is at the beginning of the disk, and "full" Windows creates one automatically as soon as you initialize a disk as GPT.  Your Crucial SSD has it in that position, but it also has a Windows partition, so that is not correct based on its contents.  That is why when you initialize a disk as GPT within Windows PE rather than full Windows, that MSR partition is NOT immediately created.

If you follow the instructions in that KB article, you will end up with the appropriate partition layout.  The diskpart instructions will manually create the EFI and MSR partitions, then when you run the restore, you'll only restore your Windows partition, followed by the Windows Recovery partition.  And yes, you do want the Recovery partition AFTER the Windows partition, because otherwise you'll end up with another one after it anyway at some point down the road.  To resize the Windows partition if needed when "staging" the restore, after dragging it down to the Destination, click the "Restored Partition Properties" link.  You can set the size of the partition in terms of how much space to leave free after it.  So if you set that Free value to the size of the Recovery partition, you'll have a space of the appropriate size to drag down the Recovery partition right after it.

Edited 22 February 2021 9:28 PM by jphughan
jphughan
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If it helps, take a look at this post I wrote.  It's a step-by-step guide for staging a partition restore, and I think it will help for two reasons.  The first is that it shows you to resize a Windows partition prior to dragging down a Recovery partition after it.  And second, the partition layout you see in the Destination in the last step of the guide is what you want to end up with.  The specific sizes may not be exactly the same, but the sequence of the partitions you stage should match what I showed there.  And in your case if you're following the KB article, you would NOT be starting with an empty destination disk as shown in that guide.  You'd have two partitions that you pre-created using diskpart.  So you would just drag down the Windows partition, resize it, then drag down the Recovery partition.

Ken429
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jphughan,
I'm getting smarter, I really appreciate the help.  One last question, I hope, the instructions say to use the restore function from a current back up file to build the new disk.  I was trying to use the clone function.  Is that a bad idea?  I remember something from the distant past that said the restore function was the better way to go?  That's what I always did - until this adventure - when creating a new disk from an SSD to a NVMe device.
Ken429
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Okay, I used the Diskpart function from the Macrium Restore USB.  All went as advertised except...the list disk function showed a 6th disk (Number 5 is the Crucial 500GB I'm playing with) of 14GB.  Diskpart did not want to clean this disk (14GB) it just came back and said nothing.  When I look at the disk in the Windows version of Diskpart it does not show the 6th disk.  When I display the layout of the disk using Manage>Disk Management it has the two partitions exactly as shown in the instructions except the space following is still unformatted. 

What the heck is the Windows PE version of Diskpart detecting that the Windows version does not see? 

Do I need to format the space after the two partitions before moving the Windows partition and Recovery Partition to the new disk?

Should I use the Clone or Restore function to move and resize the Windows partition and then move the Recovery partition to the new disk?
jphughan
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A sixth disk of 14 GB sounds like the USB flash drive you used in order to boot into Rescue.  I'm not sure why you would have tried to clean a disk that based on its size was clearly not the disk that you wanted to clone to, though.  You only need to clean the disk that will be the target of that operation.  Cleaning other disks could result in undesired data loss.

You do not need to format the unallocated space after the two small partitions you'll be creating.  Just follow the directions.

The discussion between cloning vs. imaging in terms of having a backup solution is a longer discussion.  But for the purposes of performing a migration like this, a clone is perfectly fine, and the process works the same way.  Restoring from an image and cloning from a source will achieve the same end result on the destination.

Edited 23 February 2021 2:10 PM by jphughan
Ken429
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jphughan - 23 February 2021 2:08 PM
A sixth disk of 14 GB sounds like the USB flash drive you used in order to boot into Rescue.  I'm not sure why you would have tried to clean a disk that based on its size was clearly not the disk that you wanted to clone to, though.  You only need to clean the disk that will be the target of that operation.  Cleaning other disks could result in undesired data loss.

You do not need to format the unallocated space after the two small partitions you'll be creating.  Just follow the directions.

The discussion between cloning vs. imaging in terms of having a backup solution is a longer discussion.  But for the purposes of performing a migration like this, a clone is perfectly fine, and the process works the same way.  Restoring from an image and cloning from a source will achieve the same end result on the destination.

Thanks again!!!  You're correct the magic 6th disk is the Macrium boot USB.  At least Diskpart was smart enough not to Clean it!  Like I said above, I'm getting a little smarter one screw up at a time.
GO

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