Boot Volume Required Size


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Nicolas Forwood
Nicolas Forwood
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I want to restore the SSD C:\ on my Windows 10 Lenovo laptop from my E:\ 1.5TB Seagate USB external disk. Both of these disks are more than half free

I wanted Reflect to boot automatically after the restore and during the config it said that there is no enough space on E:\ to install the Windows PE 3.1

I was puzzled at first because of the available free space on E: but then I realized that Reflect needed a new space on E: and when I went to Disk Management I noticed I can shrink the E: volume but I don’t know by how much.

Would 5GB be enough? More or less is better?

Thank you

jphughan
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Ok, there's a lot that's not entirely clear here.  It sounds like you're creating image backups of your system's Windows disk to your Seagate USB external disk.  Is that correct?  And now you want to restore your system from one of the backups on that disk?

I'm not sure what booting automatically has to do with anything, but based on the note about installing Windows PE 3.1, it sounds like you stepped through the restore wizard within full Windows and want it to reboot into the Rescue Media environment to perform the restore.  It seems you've never set up Rescue Media before if you're just now being prompted to download WinPE 3.1.  That by itself is a big red flag.  You ALWAYS want to have Rescue Media on a bootable flash drive, because if you don't have that, how would you expect to restore your system if it became unbootable unexpectedly?

The only alternative possibility I can think of here is that you're trying to create a Rescue Media partition on your Seagate drive in order to use it as your bootable Rescue Media.  But again, it's not very clear from what you described.  Maybe a screenshot of the error you're seeing would help here.

But as a general bit of guidance, if you want to be able to restore your Windows environment, then open Rescue Media Builder and create Rescue Media on a bootable flash drive.  And fyi since it sounds like you're still on Windows 7 (since Reflect mentioned WinPE 3.1, which is the Windows 7 kernel), you might want to manually choose to use WinPE 10 under the Advanced settings so that you have native USB 3.0 support.  After you get your Rescue Media, boot your PC from that in order to run your restore.  Then KEEP that Rescue Media available for future use in case it's ever needed.

You should not need to create a new partition on your Seagate drive to use it as Rescue Media, and for various reasons I discourage that practice anyway.

Hopefully this helps, but if not, please be a bit more descriptive about what you're doing, and again a screenshot may help.

Nicolas Forwood
Nicolas Forwood
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jphughan - 19 February 2021 4:50 PM
Ok, there's a lot that's not entirely clear here.  It sounds like you're creating image backups of your system's Windows disk to your Seagate USB external disk.  Is that correct?  And now you want to restore your system from one of the backups on that disk?

I'm not sure what booting automatically has to do with anything, but based on the note about installing Windows PE 3.1, it sounds like you stepped through the restore wizard within full Windows and want it to reboot into the Rescue Media environment to perform the restore.  It seems you've never set up Rescue Media before if you're just now being prompted to download WinPE 3.1.  That by itself is a big red flag.  You ALWAYS want to have Rescue Media on a bootable flash drive, because if you don't have that, how would you expect to restore your system if it became unbootable unexpectedly?

The only alternative possibility I can think of here is that you're trying to create a Rescue Media partition on your Seagate drive in order to use it as your bootable Rescue Media.  But again, it's not very clear from what you described.  Maybe a screenshot of the error you're seeing would help here.

But as a general bit of guidance, if you want to be able to restore your Windows environment, then open Rescue Media Builder and create Rescue Media on a bootable flash drive.  And fyi since it sounds like you're still on Windows 7 (since Reflect mentioned WinPE 3.1, which is the Windows 7 kernel), you might want to manually choose to use WinPE 10 under the Advanced settings so that you have native USB 3.0 support.  After you get your Rescue Media, boot your PC from that in order to run your restore.  Then KEEP that Rescue Media available for future use in case it's ever needed.

You should not need to create a new partition on your Seagate drive to use it as Rescue Media, and for various reasons I discourage that practice anyway.

Hopefully this helps, but if not, please be a bit more descriptive about what you're doing, and again a screenshot may help.

I thought my question was quite simple but I can see it is much more complicated and I thank you for your time. I will try to answer your questions the best I can.

Basically it is true that my Seagate USB external disk is my only backup disk where I keep all my backups from the 2 laptops I have. I decided to do my restore automatically because I find it easier (I let Reflect do what needs to be done). And it is also true that I thought it may be convenient to have a rescue partition on the Seagate USB so in the future I don’t have to bother finding and inserting my rescue media when I want to do a restore in either of my laptops

The Windows 10 Lenovo laptop does not have a DVD and perhaps that’s why Reflect asked to make a rescue media on my Seagate removable disk. This laptop has one SSD C:\ plus a SATA HDD D:\. I do have an external USB DVD player which I use occasionally with this laptop but when I wanted to do the restore this external DVD was not plugged because I had no need for it.

I also have another ASUS laptop with Windows 8.1 with C:\ and D:\ about the same as my Lenovo laptop. This laptop has its own DVD player. Recently I had to restore the C:\ on this laptop too and I asked Reflect to boot automatically and I inserted on the DVD my rescue DVD I had made months ago and all went smooth as it should be.

For my education I would like to know why you say “You should not need to create a new partition on your Seagate drive to use it as Rescue Media, and for various reasons I discourage that practice anyway”. If the reason{s) is important I don’t mind to always use my rescue media when it is needed but I thought having a rescue partition on the Seagate will be much better.

Thanks again for your time
Nicolas

jphughan
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There are a few reasons I discourage creating Rescue Media on external hard drives, especially hard drives that will be connected most of the time:
  • Rescue Media Builder currently doesn't support building Rescue Media to hard drives initialized as GPT.  Newer, larger hard drives are typically initialized as GPT.  In that case you'd have to set up a Rescue Media manually by creating the appropriate partition and then copying Rescue Media files directly to the partition rather than having Reflect do it.
  • If Rescue Media Builder can't find a suitable partition, it will offer to format the target as needed to create one.  I've seen people accidentally erase their entire external hard drive by clicking OK to this option, either assuming that Rescue Media Builder would simply shrink the existing partition on their drive or accidentally selecting their hard drive when they meant to click something else.
  • Some PCs do not support booting from USB "fixed disk class" devices like HDDs and SSDs and instead only support booting from USB "removable storage class" devices like flash drives.  If you can't boot from the hard drive, then it's useless to have Rescue Media files on it.
  • Some Dell laptops I've seen will only boot from Partition #1 of a USB device initialized as GPT, even though they will boot from later partitions when that same device is initialized as MBR.  So if you have a GPT disk and your Rescue Media partition is not first on disk, that can create a problem.
  • And perhaps most importantly, Rescue Media is meant to be able to rescue you after any sort of crisis you might have on your system, including things like malware and ransomware incidents.  But if your only Rescue Media is sitting on a disk that is connected most of the time, then there's a decent chance that it might be affected by a malware/ransomware incident, or any other number of potential problems.  If your Rescue Media isn't available to help you recover from those situations, then it's not much good.
For all of those reasons, I recommend putting Rescue Media on a disc or (more frequently these days) a USB flash drive, specifically one that is not connected to the system most of the time.

But if you want fast access to Rescue Media, you also have the option of using the recovery boot menu option by selecting Windows Boot Menu as the build target in Rescue Media Builder.  That will cause Reflect to add a boot option to Windows Boot Manager allowing you to boot into Rescue from files cached on your C partition (by default, unless you changed the location of the PE files in Edit Defaults > Advanced).  That will generally allow you to run restores and such from the Rescue environment without having to boot from another device.  But while that can be convenient, it is NOT a replacement for "external" Rescue Media because there are all sorts of situations where those files on your C drive may not be available.

I personally have NOT found it easier to set up restores within Windows.  First of all it isn't "automatic".  You still have to go through all the steps within Windows that you would otherwise be performing in Rescue anyway.  But more importantly, it doesn't always work.  I've found that if you have to boot into Rescue Media to run the restore anyway, then you may as well set up the restore in that environment in the first place rather than doing all the same work in full Windows only to have to reboot into something else to let the restore run.


Edited 19 February 2021 6:21 PM by jphughan
Nicolas Forwood
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jphughan - 19 February 2021 6:19 PM
There are a few reasons I discourage creating Rescue Media on external hard drives, especially hard drives that will be connected most of the time:
  • Rescue Media Builder currently doesn't support building Rescue Media to hard drives initialized as GPT.  Newer, larger hard drives are typically initialized as GPT.  In that case you'd have to set up a Rescue Media manually by creating the appropriate partition and then copying Rescue Media files directly to the partition rather than having Reflect do it.
  • If Rescue Media Builder can't find a suitable partition, it will offer to format the target as needed to create one.  I've seen people accidentally erase their entire external hard drive by clicking OK to this option, either assuming that Rescue Media Builder would simply shrink the existing partition on their drive or accidentally selecting their hard drive when they meant to click something else.
  • Some PCs do not support booting from USB "fixed disk class" devices like HDDs and SSDs and instead only support booting from USB "removable storage class" devices like flash drives.  If you can't boot from the hard drive, then it's useless to have Rescue Media files on it.
  • Some Dell laptops I've seen will only boot from Partition #1 of a USB device initialized as GPT, even though they will boot from later partitions when that same device is initialized as MBR.  So if you have a GPT disk and your Rescue Media partition is not first on disk, that can create a problem.
  • And perhaps most importantly, Rescue Media is meant to be able to rescue you after any sort of crisis you might have on your system, including things like malware and ransomware incidents.  But if your only Rescue Media is sitting on a disk that is connected most of the time, then there's a decent chance that it might be affected by a malware/ransomware incident, or any other number of potential problems.  If your Rescue Media isn't available to help you recover from those situations, then it's not much good.
For all of those reasons, I recommend putting Rescue Media on a disc or (more frequently these days) a USB flash drive, specifically one that is not connected to the system most of the time.

But if you want fast access to Rescue Media, you also have the option of using the recovery boot menu option by selecting Windows Boot Menu as the build target in Rescue Media Builder.  That will cause Reflect to add a boot option to Windows Boot Manager allowing you to boot into Rescue from files cached on your C partition (by default, unless you changed the location of the PE files in Edit Defaults > Advanced).  That will generally allow you to run restores and such from the Rescue environment without having to boot from another device.  But while that can be convenient, it is NOT a replacement for "external" Rescue Media because there are all sorts of situations where those files on your C drive may not be available.

I personally have NOT found it easier to set up restores within Windows.  First of all it isn't "automatic".  You still have to go through all the steps within Windows that you would otherwise be performing in Rescue anyway.  But more importantly, it doesn't always work.  I've found that if you have to boot into Rescue Media to run the restore anyway, then you may as well set up the restore in that environment in the first place rather than doing all the same work in full Windows only to have to reboot into something else to let the restore run.


The reasons are many and very interesting so I will stick to a rescue media.

Thanks again for your time
Nicolas

Nicolas Forwood
Nicolas Forwood
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Nicolas Forwood - 19 February 2021 7:07 PM
jphughan - 19 February 2021 6:19 PM
There are a few reasons I discourage creating Rescue Media on external hard drives, especially hard drives that will be connected most of the time:
  • Rescue Media Builder currently doesn't support building Rescue Media to hard drives initialized as GPT.  Newer, larger hard drives are typically initialized as GPT.  In that case you'd have to set up a Rescue Media manually by creating the appropriate partition and then copying Rescue Media files directly to the partition rather than having Reflect do it.
  • If Rescue Media Builder can't find a suitable partition, it will offer to format the target as needed to create one.  I've seen people accidentally erase their entire external hard drive by clicking OK to this option, either assuming that Rescue Media Builder would simply shrink the existing partition on their drive or accidentally selecting their hard drive when they meant to click something else.
  • Some PCs do not support booting from USB "fixed disk class" devices like HDDs and SSDs and instead only support booting from USB "removable storage class" devices like flash drives.  If you can't boot from the hard drive, then it's useless to have Rescue Media files on it.
  • Some Dell laptops I've seen will only boot from Partition #1 of a USB device initialized as GPT, even though they will boot from later partitions when that same device is initialized as MBR.  So if you have a GPT disk and your Rescue Media partition is not first on disk, that can create a problem.
  • And perhaps most importantly, Rescue Media is meant to be able to rescue you after any sort of crisis you might have on your system, including things like malware and ransomware incidents.  But if your only Rescue Media is sitting on a disk that is connected most of the time, then there's a decent chance that it might be affected by a malware/ransomware incident, or any other number of potential problems.  If your Rescue Media isn't available to help you recover from those situations, then it's not much good.
For all of those reasons, I recommend putting Rescue Media on a disc or (more frequently these days) a USB flash drive, specifically one that is not connected to the system most of the time.

But if you want fast access to Rescue Media, you also have the option of using the recovery boot menu option by selecting Windows Boot Menu as the build target in Rescue Media Builder.  That will cause Reflect to add a boot option to Windows Boot Manager allowing you to boot into Rescue from files cached on your C partition (by default, unless you changed the location of the PE files in Edit Defaults > Advanced).  That will generally allow you to run restores and such from the Rescue environment without having to boot from another device.  But while that can be convenient, it is NOT a replacement for "external" Rescue Media because there are all sorts of situations where those files on your C drive may not be available.

I personally have NOT found it easier to set up restores within Windows.  First of all it isn't "automatic".  You still have to go through all the steps within Windows that you would otherwise be performing in Rescue anyway.  But more importantly, it doesn't always work.  I've found that if you have to boot into Rescue Media to run the restore anyway, then you may as well set up the restore in that environment in the first place rather than doing all the same work in full Windows only to have to reboot into something else to let the restore run.


The reasons are many and very interesting so I will stick to a rescue media.

Thanks again for your time
Nicolas

Hello jphughan

Perhaps what I’m saying below is not appropriate on this thread or you may don’t have the time to answer and if that is the case please ignore it.

I have an external 125GB SSD hard disk which connects to my Windows 8.1 laptop thru a USB cable. I want to install XP-PRO on that disk (I have the original DVD + I made an ISO file from it) and I used Reflect to create a bootable partition which was completed successfully. First I shrank the volume by 10GB and now on the file explorer I see two letters for this disk:
G:\Macrium PE (1.0GB)
Unallocated (8.16GB)

I copied in both (I didn’t know which one is better to do so) the ISO file but I can’t boot from this disk.

Trying various other options I ended up with this disk been not visible in the Windows file explorer and in the Windows disk management I only see 900kb on that disk. On the device manager it just says healthy disk. I know I have damaged the MBR on that disk and the only way to repair it, as far as I know, is to use the command line which I have forgotten completely. If you have the time to let me know what is needed it will be appreciated otherwise my apologies for bothering you.

Thank you

jphughan
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Full Windows (as opposed to WinPE/RE) does not support booting from a disk attached via USB, with the exception of Windows To Go, which requires special prep and enterprise licensing. And XP never had support for USB 3.0 or even proper optimizations for SSDs, so those would be additional problems.
Edited 22 February 2021 6:05 AM by jphughan
Nicolas Forwood
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jphughan - 22 February 2021 6:04 AM
Full Windows (as opposed to WinPE/RE) does not support booting from a disk attached via USB, with the exception of Windows To Go, which requires special prep and enterprise licensing. And XP never had support for USB 3.0 or even proper optimizations for SSDs, so those would be additional problems.

Thank you so much for your time, I understand
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