Windows Boot Manager/Boot Menu


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Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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For the ease of Backing up and Re-imaging I used to depend on 'Windows Boot Menu' rather than a 'USB stick' or a 'CD' ( though I have them both)
Please see the following 2 items
1. Disk management profile of my PC with Windows 10 (Attachment 1)

     Other that the little space allotted for the GPT(200mb) there are three 500 MB partitions to support the Windows . There used to be only one. How did they come. Does it come with every attempt on creating a 'Windows Boot Manager'? Many a times the boot manager disappears after a full update using the latest Windows 10 USB stick created . Therefore I will have to create another 'Windows Boot manager'. If that is the case how can I recognize which is the latest one so that the others can be removed?
2. BIOS

Here you can see three Windows Boot Managers on the same Samsung SSD. Even a BIOS Update did not help me remove these extra 2 boot managers. Please advise me as to how to tackle this. I need only one Boot Manager and One 'Support drive' for the Windows Installation.
Dr Abdul Rasheed
jphughan
jphughan
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The Windows Boot Menu option in Reflect does not create any additional partitions or any additional boot entries in your BIOS. It just adds an entry within the existing Windows Boot Manager database for Rescue Media, and that entry points to a file that is stored on your C partition by default. But there’s still only one Windows Boot Manager in your BIOS and no addition partition. I’m not sure how you ended up with that partition layout. It’s not even clear from your screenshot what they’re all doing. It looks like all three of the partitions that are larger than 500 MB are tagged as Recovery partitions, but your screenshot cuts that off. Windows can create new Recovery partitions during feature updates, although after you have one located immediately after your C partition, it’s supposed to just keep expanding that one as needed by shrinking your C partition as needed.

In terms of how to fix it, if you really wanted to do it, I would capture an image of your entire system, then perform a custom restore so that you restored only the required partitions in the proper order, and then you might have to run Fix Boot Problems to make it work again. But do you really want to do something like that?

By the way, if you need to show partition layouts, posting a screenshot of Reflect’s view is often more useful than Windows Disk Management’s view, because Windows Disk Management doesn’t even show an MSR partition when one exists.  So you probably have one more partition you’re not even seeing in Windows right now. And it shows a bit more information overall.
Edited 7 February 2021 3:24 PM by jphughan
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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jphughan - 7 February 2021 3:23 PM
The Windows Boot Menu option in Reflect does not create any additional partitions or any additional boot entries in your BIOS. It just adds an entry within the existing Windows Boot Manager database for Rescue Media, and that entry points to a file that is stored on your C partition by default. But there’s still only one Windows Boot Manager in your BIOS and no addition partition. I’m not sure how you ended up with that partition layout. It’s not even clear from your screenshot what they’re all doing. It looks like all three of the partitions that are larger than 500 MB are tagged as Recovery partitions, but your screenshot cuts that off. Windows can create new Recovery partitions during feature updates, although after you have one located immediately after your C partition, it’s supposed to just keep expanding that one as needed by shrinking your C partition as needed.

In terms of how to fix it, if you really wanted to do it, I would capture an image of your entire system, then perform a custom restore so that you restored only the required partitions in the proper order, and then you might have to run Fix Boot Problems to make it work again. But do you really want to do something like that?

By the way, if you need to show partition layouts, posting a screenshot of Reflect’s view is often more useful than Windows Disk Management’s view, because Windows Disk Management doesn’t even show an MSR partition when one exists.  So you probably have one more partition you’re not even seeing in Windows right now. And it shows a bit more information overall.



Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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Please find attached the hard disk profile of my Desktop, as seen by Macrium Reflect, and .......................................


and by Minitools

I think these tow screen shots are convincing.
Thank you very much for the response
Dr Abdul  Rasheed.


jphughan
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Ok, Partitions 1 and 2 are backwards. On disks that contain a Windows installation, the EFI Partition (partition 2 in your case) is supposed to be placed before the MSR partition (partition 1 in your case). But as for Partitions 3, 5, and 6, they do indeed all appear to be Windows Recovery partitions. If you want to find out which one is in use, open an elevated Command Prompt and enter “reagentc /info”. But again, fixing this will require either a custom restore operation or live repartitioning. Both have their complexities and their risks.
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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jphughan - 7 February 2021 5:12 PM
Ok, Partitions 1 and 2 are backwards. On disks that contain a Windows installation, the EFI Partition (partition 2 in your case) is supposed to be placed before the MSR partition (partition 1 in your case). But as for Partitions 3, 5, and 6, they do indeed all appear to be Windows Recovery partitions. If you want to find out which one is in use, open an elevated Command Prompt and enter “reagentc /info”. But again, fixing this will require either a custom restore operation or live repartitioning. Both have their complexities and their risks.


Thank you very much for the information provided.
I have the latest Macrium backup done 2 days back.
You said, "Partitions 1 and 2 are backwards". They are the older ones?,
That means I can have a Recovery from the latest Image backed up with only the 'Recovery Drive' just after the C drive ( from left to right)and the left most( No 1) ?
Following this Recovery I will observe what happens to those three "Windows Boot Mangers' in the BIOS.
Please remember that I am a 73 year old buddy -( By profession an Anesthetist Wink
Dr Abdul Rasheed

jphughan
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No, I was just saying that if you ever wanted to fix that, you could restore a backup in a way that swapped the sequence of those partitions. You wouldn’t have to run a special kind of backup. You just restore a normal backup a bit differently. But if you’re not very experienced with all of this, I really wouldn’t worry about it. Your system is currently working, and the extra partitions aren’t taking up very much space, so it probably isn’t worth messing around with your partitions if you wouldn’t know how to fix things if your system doesn’t immediately work after you modify your partition layout.
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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jphughan - 8 February 2021 3:47 AM
No, I was just saying that if you ever wanted to fix that, you could restore a backup in a way that swapped the sequence of those partitions. You wouldn’t have to run a special kind of backup. You just restore a normal backup a bit differently. But if you’re not very experienced with all of this, I really wouldn’t worry about it. Your system is currently working, and the extra partitions aren’t taking up very much space, so it probably isn’t worth messing around with your partitions if you wouldn’t know how to fix things if your system doesn’t immediately work after you modify your partition layout.
Thank you very much for the information.
I can easily swap  & 2. I think only these two are relevant.
I will try this in next 'recovery experiment, without pulling down those 'other recovery drives' and see the result.
will come back to you soon


Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
Dr Abdul Rasheed Rasheed
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I did it
respecting your suggestion that drive 1 and 2 should have been swapped.
I brought 2 to position to the position of 1,
Chose 3 and 4( C ).
Did not pull down 5 & 6, thus saving 1 GB.

The system is working beautifully.
Now I have to solve two more doubts.
1. If a drive automatically appear after every upgradation of the Windows 10 using a Pendrive,  keeping all settings and Files, and
2. Those "Extra two Boot managers" in the BIOS.
with best regards
Dr Abdul Rasheed
jphughan
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That's better, but the Recovery partition (Partition 3 in your screenshot) should be AFTER the Windows partition, not before it.  That way when you install new Windows 10 feature updates, Windows can just shrink your C drive in order to create space to expand that Recover partition after it.  But that doesn't work when the Recovery partition is located before the OS partition.  So you should switch those around as well.  And you should allocate that 1.05 GB of free space to your C partition as well rather than leaving it as unused space.

GO

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