CMOS clock error after swapping out cloned disk?


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Mark J Davis
Mark J Davis
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Not a huge deal because everything seems to work OK after going through the BIOS update, but I'd like to understand the "why" of it...  I cloned my ssd with no problem, shut off my computer, and swapped the new ssd in for the one I'd just cloned to it--just to be sure I had a working clone.  When I booted to the new ssd, I immediately got an error message indicating a checksum problem with the cmos clock--and was instructed to update the clock in bios before proceeding, which I did. The system booted perfectly after that, and everything seems fine.  So, any clue as to why I got the error?

jphughan
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If it’s an older PC, the real time clock battery might be getting old. It’s a coin cell battery on the motherboard. Or maybe you nudged it just enough to briefly disconnect it while swapping drives/cables around?
Mark J Davis
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jphughan - 20 December 2020 2:54 AM
If it’s an older PC, the real time clock battery might be getting old. It’s a coin cell battery on the motherboard. Or maybe you nudged it just enough to briefly disconnect it while swapping drives/cables around?

Hmmm... Could be, I suppose.  Can't say it's not.  After owning at least a dozen PCs over the last 30 years, I've only had to replace a clock battery once, and when I reboot (several times now) I don't get the clock error--so I'm guessing that's not it.  I was pretty careful rummaging around in the enclosure, but I suppose it's possible I touched it.  Who knows...  As I said, it's working fine now.  It's just that I like to understand why these things happen.  Perhaps this one will never be known.  Thanks for the response, though!

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You'll know more if you, if laptop, remove the battery, remove the power adapter, hold down the PowerOn button for about 5-sec, wait about 2-min... then put Humpty back together again.
Edited 20 December 2020 4:11 PM by Froggie
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Yes, I can't understand why what you did would generate a CMOS error involving the clock.  I know sometimes when I restore really old images, the Windows clock is off until Windows phones home to the server clock for the current time.  But, that's a software thing, not what you experienced.


Now, I have encountered cases where I had a PC that indicated my CMOS coin cell battery needed replacing.  I forget the error I got about 10 years ago.  But, it indicated the CMOS battery needed replacing, even though the system was relatively new.  It was the only time I ever replaced a CMOS battery, too.  Didn't solve the problem, though, as I kept getting repeated, random messages of the same thing.  Took the PC into a shop.  The weird thing was the problem went away when the tech just swapped around the SATA cables of the HDD and the optical burner.  No idea WHY he thought of trying that or why it worked, but it seemed to fix the problem as it went away.

Mark J Davis
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Froggie - 20 December 2020 4:09 PM
You'll know more if you, if laptop, remove the battery, remove the power adapter, hold down the PowerOn button for about 5-sec, wait about 2-min... then put Humpty back together again.

Appreciate the suggestion, but it's not a laptop...
Mark J Davis
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dbminter - 20 December 2020 4:13 PM
Yes, I can't understand why what you did would generate a CMOS error involving the clock.  I know sometimes when I restore really old images, the Windows clock is off until Windows phones home to the server clock for the current time.  But, that's a software thing, not what you experienced.


Now, I have encountered cases where I had a PC that indicated my CMOS coin cell battery needed replacing.  I forget the error I got about 10 years ago.  But, it indicated the CMOS battery needed replacing, even though the system was relatively new.  It was the only time I ever replaced a CMOS battery, too.  Didn't solve the problem, though, as I kept getting repeated, random messages of the same thing.  Took the PC into a shop.  The weird thing was the problem went away when the tech just swapped around the SATA cables of the HDD and the optical burner.  No idea WHY he thought of trying that or why it worked, but it seemed to fix the problem as it went away.

Well, this wasn't an old image.  I ran the clone>shut down the pc>swapped in the clone ssd for the cloned one>rebooted...  So the two ssds were virtually identical.  Did have to unplug and remove the video card to get to the ssd, so perhaps that had something to do with it...  Hate a mystery I can't solve.  Fortunately, I'm back to work so will just need to get over it
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Batteries are very handy things but they are also an erratic PITA sometimes.
I would unplug the computer overnight or some long time period and then see if it happens again. Unplug to ensure the "keep-alive" voltage from the PS is not having any effect on keeping things running so the battery will have do its intended function.
You could also restart it after the unplugging with the networking disconnected or disabled so it cannot run off and get the correct time from a network server but your error message indicates it may not be just an incorrect time issue.
Edited 21 December 2020 2:25 PM by Seekforever
Mark J Davis
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Seekforever - 21 December 2020 2:22 PM
Batteries are very handy things but they are also an erratic PITA sometimes.
I would unplug the computer overnight or some long time period and then see if it happens again. Unplug to ensure the "keep-alive" voltage from the PS is not having any effect on keeping things running so the battery will have do its intended function.
You could also restart it after the unplugging with the networking disconnected or disabled so it cannot run off and get the correct time from a network server but your error message indicates it may not be just an incorrect time issue.

Hmmm...  sounds like an answer straight from William of Ockham...  I'll try it and see what happens. Thanks for a suggestion I should have thought of myself! 
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