Can Macrium rescue my Win 10?


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Terry Ryan
Terry Ryan
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A non-Macrium app did something to my Win 10 and it no longer will boot.  Goes to a blue screen that tells me my system needs repair - duh.

So I boot with my (Free version/30 day trial) rescue media and go to Fix Windows Boot Problems and fill in the Installed Windows Operating Systems box.  We get to the Boot Code Options and do the default select of all the boxes and click Finish.

Updating Partition Boot Sector appears to fail with a red X.  The others have the green check.

The system will not boot, same blue screen.  Am I sh*t out of luck?

Can't get insert image to work.  Just shows a cloud?

Thanks,
Terry
capair45
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TR - 4 December 2020 11:03 PM
A non-Macrium app did something to my Win 10 and it no longer will boot.  Goes to a blue screen that tells me my system needs repair - duh.

So I boot with my (Free version/30 day trial) rescue media and go to Fix Windows Boot Problems and fill in the Installed Windows Operating Systems box.  We get to the Boot Code Options and do the default select of all the boxes and click Finish.

Updating Partition Boot Sector appears to fail with a red X.  The others have the green check.

The system will not boot, same blue screen.  Am I sh*t out of luck?

Can't get insert image to work.  Just shows a cloud?

Thanks,
Terry


Do you have an image of that disk when things were in good shape?  If so, you should boot into rescue media and restore that image.  The Fix Boot utility is normally used after a restore when Windows will not boot.


Windows 10 Home (21H1)  Build 19043.1237
Macrium Reflect 8.0.6161
Windows Defender
Malwarebytes Premium 4.4.6


Edited 4 December 2020 11:30 PM by capair45
jphughan
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The fixes attempted by Fix Boot Problems depend on how the Rescue Media itself was booted, i.e. in Legacy BIOS or UEFI mode.  You want to boot it in the same way that the OS you're trying to repair is designed to boot -- but some systems support booting both ways, in which case it's possible to boot Rescue Media in the opposite way that Windows boots.  If the disk that contains your Windows partition is MBR, then your Windows environment boots in Legacy BIOS.  If it's GPT, then it boots in UEFI mode.  You can see this by checking the "Disk Image / Backup" tab of your Rescue Media environment, which shows all detected disks. The way to tell how you booted your Rescue Media is to check the title bar along the top edge.  If it says "[UEFI]" at the very end, it's UEFI.  If it doesn't, then it's Legacy BIOS.  If you're booting in the "wrong" way, then fixing that depends on your system.  If you're booting from Rescue Media by invoking a one-time boot menu on your system during startup, then sometimes flash drives or optical discs will be listed twice, one for each boot mode.  UEFI options are typically indicated as such.  So you might just have to select a different "instance" of your boot device in the list.

But as capair45 said above, Fix Boot Problems focuses on fixing issues that can prevent newly cloned/restored disks from booting properly.  So depending on what caused your issue in the first place, it may not help.

Edited 5 December 2020 12:19 AM by jphughan
dbminter
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Reflect is more of a proactive than reactive solution.  It's designed to make backups of systems before they go bad so you can restore them back later when Windows does mess up.  If Fix Boot Problems doesn't work, then, there's probably little Reflect can do to help if you didn't have a pre-existing backup.

Terry Ryan
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Thanks everyone.  The disk is GPT and the usb stick/rescue media boots from UEFI.  I think I am out of luck.  I downloaded the Win10 Setup/Repair file and went to Advanced options/Command Prompt.  I type E:and get "The file or directory is corrupted and unreadable.  Sounds very bad.

E: is the system drive, not the customary C:.

I do have an image backup dated Nov 2.  I replaced the mobo/processor/ram about Nov 30.  Do you think I should try this image?

Thanks again.
dbminter
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Since you replaced some key components, particularly the mobo, you may have to run ReDeploy afterwards if you do decide to restore down this November 2nd image.  If you restore the image and can't get Windows to start, you may have to run one or both of ReDeploy and Fix Boot Problems from the Rescue Media.

jphughan
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@TR Sorry to hear that.  I would consider first using your Rescue Media to make a BACKUP of your disk as it is.  Even if it's unbootable, that way you'll at least ensure you have all the data you can get off that disk before you blow it away.  If nothing else, you might need to recover some specific files later on, and this way you'll know that everything that's attainable is backed up rather than worrying you might be blowing away something you're not thinking of right now but might need later.

After that, if you want to restore an older image, I'd go for it.  It would presumably be easier to go back to that point than start all over.  In terms of the hardware replacement, if the restored image doesn't immediately boot, go back to Rescue and run Fix Boot Problems.  If it still doesn't boot, then run ReDeploy.  Good luck!

Terry Ryan
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My OS is restored!!  I can't believe it.  I won't be able to list "exactly" what I did but... I ran chkdsk E: from the usb stick and it fixed a ton of errors on E:, enough that E: became normal readable and accessible with dir and other commands.

But it still booted to a blue screen, but a blue screen that provided more options than the others.  Anyway, I fooled around and rebooted to a blue screen that told me choose between two Windows installations?!?  So I chose the disk 5 (I don't have a disk 5 that I know of, last one is disk 4 which held ESmile.  BOOM, PC boots to normal Win 10 like nothing had ever happened.

I'm gonna make a new System Image now.

Thanks everyone.

Terry

Terry Ryan
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OK, let me know if I am in the wrong forum.  I definitely don't want to be a PITA.Smile

Anyway, I was going to make a system image with Win10.  It failed.  This fail is what started the whole fiasco with boot fail, etc.  Sorry, I forgot that.

Now I remember that I tried to fix Sys Image fail with some disk partitioning tool.  That is when crashed and would not reboot.

I think my partitions are messed up on the NVme C; drive.  I don't know what the 524 Meg healthy, recovery partition is about.


jphughan
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The partitions before and after your C partition are normal.  The one after the C partition is the Windows Recovery partition, which contains some tools to help recover unbootable systems, such as Startup Repair, System Restore, System Image Restore, etc.  Or at least that what it's supposed to be.  The only strange things that jump out at me are:
  • You created a dynamic disk on your 500 GB Samsung.  That seems unnecessary given that you've only done that on one disk, and dynamic disks can be more of a pain to work with.
  • Your System Reserved partition is supposed to be hidden, without a drive letter assigned, but it's assigned D in your case.
  • Your volume labels seem rather long and in some cases redundant, but that's admittedly cosmetic.
Not sure what's going on with your Windows image backup capability, but why are you even using that when you have Reflect?  The Windows system image function is pretty horrible compared to Reflect.  It lacks support for tons of useful features and is hugely inflexible when it comes to restores.  You can't choose to restore only certain partitions, you can't choose to preserve certain existing partitions on the destination, you can't resize partitions during the restore if you're restoring to a larger disk, and you can't restore at all onto a smaller disk than the source, even if all the data will fit onto that smaller disk.  I really wouldn't recommend using it.

And even if you want to use Windows for file-level backups, you should really use File History rather than the legacy Windows 7 mechanism.

Edited 6 December 2020 5:16 PM by jphughan
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