MBR to GPT NVMe not bootable UEFI


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Flyer
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This is confusing. I've done multiple successful test MBR restores to a GPT SSD in a test PC and setting it as a UEFI boot. I've followed the directions in the manual (page 240) and performed the UEFI "fix boot" procedure. I've also installed a NVMe drive in my own PC (Gigabyte motherboard) using the same procedure and it worked and is working fine as the boot drive. 
But I've run into the same problem on my next 2 attempts at installing NVMe drives in 2 different PC's (both using the same Gigabyte motherboard but different from mine). They wouldn't boot (blue screened). I used the same procedure on both. I made a current Full backup to an external T5 SSD. I installed the NVMe drive and disconnected all other drives except the T5. I booted into the Macrium USB drive making sure to use the UEFI option. It did show UEFI at the top of the screen when Macrium loaded. I followed the procedure on page 240 of the manual and restored just the C partition to the new drive. I did the "fix boot" procedure and it appeared to work. I then booted into the BIOS and it did show the first boot drive to be the Windows Boot Manager of the new drive. But when trying to boot it blue screened. I tried using the Windows startup repair option using a Windows USB installation stick. No luck. I also changed the BIOS to boot using UEFI only as it was set for CSM by default which shows that option should boot UEFI or MBR. No luck. The default option on my PC wasn't changed and it worked there. The first PC I tried this with was/is in a different city and to get it to work, I just cleaned the NVMe in diskpart and cloned the old SSD to it. I had to do the same thing here with my wife's PC after installing the NVMe stick.  So they are both running in MBR.
What did I do wrong after multiple successful attempts with my test PC and on my own PC???
Edited 23 November 2020 1:01 AM by Flyer
jphughan
jphughan
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You mentioned a screenshot, but there aren't any in your post.  But if the image you originally made came from a non-NVMe storage device, then if your system is in AHCI mode rather than RAID/Intel RST mode, you might have to run ReDeploy after restoring the image so that Reflect configures the restored Windows environment to load its NVMe driver at boot.  On systems using RAID/RST mode, this isn't necessary because Windows is always talking to the RST controller, which abstracts the backend storage interface.

Flyer
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I didn't mention a screenshot but that isn't important. The test restores didn't involve an NVMe but the restore to my own PC was to a new NVMe and the PC was in AHCI and it worked. In any case, unless there is a pressing need to convert to GPT or to use UEFI everything is working ok right now. If for some reason I ever have to do this again, I'll keep the redeploy option in mind.
This may be something Macrium might want to include in their manual if restoring to a NVMe. I would not have thought about not having NVMe drivers loaded as a problem. I was concentrating on a boot loader error as the problem. 
Thanks for the idea.

Added later... now I'm confused. You would think this would present a problem anytime a new NVMe is added and cloned to or restored to and of course this isn't the case.
Edited 23 November 2020 4:33 AM by Flyer
jphughan
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Sorry, I somehow misread “blue screened” as something involving “screenshot”. ReDeploy is technically billed as a mechanism to restore to dissimilar hardware, not necessarily a completely different PC, and changing the type of storage device would be a restore to dissimilar hardware. It might not be practical to spell out all of the scenarios where ReDeploy would be needed. In any case, the reason I mentioned it is that a blue screen is a possible result of restoring SATA to NVMe without running ReDeploy, and since you didn’t provide any error code for the blue screen you encountered, I figured that was a possible cause. But if you want to provide that now, it might help identify the true cause.

In terms of the need to convert to GPT/UEFI, Windows feature updates seem to refuse to install if you’re in Legacy BIOS mode AND they can tell that your system is capable of UEFI booting. For systems that support being put into full Legacy mode, which disables all UEFI support, that won’t be detectable. But running in UEFI CSM means your system is supporting both boot mechanisms simultaneously. So you might be forced to convert at some point. But Microsoft provides an MBR2GPT utility for this purpose — which contrary to the name does more than just convert the OS disk from MBR to GPT. It also creates the additional partitions necessary to boot Windows in UEFI mode. That said, I’m not sure why the steps outlined in the Macrium KB article for restoring an MBR disk in a particular way to make it UEFI bootable didn’t succeed for you on this particular system.
Flyer
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Added later... now I'm confused. You would think this would present a problem anytime a new NVMe is added and cloned to or restored to and of course this isn't the case.
jphughan
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At least for systems in AHCI mode when moving FROM a SATA disk, yes. But maybe recent Windows 10 versions have improved this somewhat? It does get a new feature release approximately every 6 months, so past experience and conventional wisdom have shorter lifespans than they did with previous Windows versions. Windows 10 has seemed to be more tolerant of booting to dissimilar hardware in general, whereas previous versions were more likely to blue screen in that situation.
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