ReDeploy questions


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NefCanuck
NefCanuck
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Group: Awaiting Activation
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I know this is going to sound like an overly simple question but bear with me as I'm about to embark on something that I've never tried before.

I'm currently running a custom-built PC that is about seven years old, running the latest version of Windows 10 professional 64-bit, this was an upgrade from a retail copy of Windows 8.1 professional. It currently has two SSD drives, one for the operating system and programs in the second for larger games and data.

I'm shopping for a new PC, because I have particular needs it will be either a "white box" NUC or a "name brand" PC that is easy to lift and move.

if I understand how redeploy works along with the Microsoft licensing, I should be able to restore to the new machine and not have licensing issues with Windows itself

However, I am not guaranteed that the other software that is activated on my machine will transfer over without issue depending on their licensing, is that correct?

NefCanuck

jphughan
jphughan
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No.  ReDeploy is focused specifically on making sure that Windows will BOOT on the new hardware, since "transplanting" a Windows installation to completely new hardware without any modification will not always allow it to start properly, due to the fact that in order to reduce boot time, Windows makes certain assumptions about what underlying hardware will be present and will not always dynamically adapt to changes in key hardware.  Instead, it simply blue screens because it loaded the wrong driver for the new hardware or was missing a driver for some new piece of hardware.  ReDeploy is designed to perform offline modifications of restored Windows installations in order to configure it to load the appropriate drivers for the new hardware, including injecting new drivers into that installation if needed.  ReDeploy does absolutely nothing about Microsoft licensing concerns.  The ability of your Windows installation to remain activated can depend on factors such as how your OS was originally licensed, whether you've linked it to your Microsoft account (in which case it can be transferred), and whether your new system has a license for the same version and edition of Windows that you're migrating.  If that last condition is true, then even if Windows isn't initially activated on the new hardware, it should be able to reactivate -- assuming of course that you buy hardware that comes with a suitable license.

NefCanuck
NefCanuck
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Group: Awaiting Activation
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jphughan - 23 October 2020 3:53 PM
No.  ReDeploy is focused specifically on making sure that Windows will BOOT on the new hardware, since "transplanting" a Windows installation to completely new hardware without any modification will not always allow it to start properly, due to the fact that in order to reduce boot time, Windows makes certain assumptions about what underlying hardware will be present and will not always dynamically adapt to changes in key hardware.  Instead, it simply blue screens because it loaded the wrong driver for the new hardware or was missing a driver for some new piece of hardware.  ReDeploy is designed to perform offline modifications of restored Windows installations in order to configure it to load the appropriate drivers for the new hardware, including injecting new drivers into that installation if needed.  ReDeploy does absolutely nothing about Microsoft licensing concerns.  The ability of your Windows installation to remain activated can depend on factors such as how your OS was originally licensed, whether you've linked it to your Microsoft account (in which case it can be transferred), and whether your new system has a license for the same version and edition of Windows that you're migrating.  If that last condition is true, then even if Windows isn't initially activated on the new hardware, it should be able to reactivate -- assuming of course that you buy hardware that comes with a suitable license.

Okay, that makes sense, what I'm really trying to avoid is having to re-install everything (especially MS Office) when I buy the new machine, because it would literally take me days to do with the number of programs I have and use regularly.

Based on what you've posted though, i think I should buy a Windows 10 license for the new machine (cheap enough to do at the time of purchase) just to ensure that there are no issues (because either it should accept the transfer of the license from the machine to be decommissioned or the OEM license key from the new machine)

NefCanuck

jphughan
jphughan
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If you haven't bought a system yet, then yes buying a Windows license for the same edition you have (Home vs. Pro) would definitely increase the likelihood of things working out.  Unless you check your license activation status and see that you're using a license linked to your Microsoft cloud account.  In that case, those can be reassigned to other systems, but at that point the original system will fall out of activation.  Not sure if you have any need to keep Windows usable on the outgoing system for some other purpose.

NefCanuck
NefCanuck
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jphughan - 23 October 2020 7:15 PM
If you haven't bought a system yet, then yes buying a Windows license for the same edition you have (Home vs. Pro) would definitely increase the likelihood of things working out.  Unless you check your license activation status and see that you're using a license linked to your Microsoft cloud account.  In that case, those can be reassigned to other systems, but at that point the original system will fall out of activation.  Not sure if you have any need to keep Windows usable on the outgoing system for some other purpose.

Well according to Microsoft it appears to have treated the upgrade from 8.1 to 10 as an OEM copy of Windows, so I think for safety sake I spend the extra $150 or so to get a Windows Pro license with the new box.

But I think I'm going to try to find a mini "white box" system because if it's a branded PC with it's own suite of support software, I can't see an image from a "white box" PC working well.

Thank you

NefCanuck

MsT18
MsT18
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NefCanuck - 23 October 2020 9:06 PM
jphughan - 23 October 2020 7:15 PM
If you haven't bought a system yet, then yes buying a Windows license for the same edition you have (Home vs. Pro) would definitely increase the likelihood of things working out.  Unless you check your license activation status and see that you're using a license linked to your Microsoft cloud account.  In that case, those can be reassigned to other systems, but at that point the original system will fall out of activation.  Not sure if you have any need to keep Windows usable on the outgoing system for some other purpose.

Well according to Microsoft it appears to have treated the upgrade from 8.1 to 10 as an OEM copy of Windows, so I think for safety sake I spend the extra $150 or so to get a Windows Pro license with the new box.

But I think I'm going to try to find a mini "white box" system because if it's a branded PC with it's own suite of support software, I can't see an image from a "white box" PC working well.

Thank you

NefCanuck

Unless you know for sure it won't be able to be transferred, I'd suggest you try the current licence on the new system before buying a new licence. MS does seem to be fairly generous with Windows 10. As long as you're transferring it and not trying to use the same licence on two systems, MS might well swap the licence over to the new system. If not, nothing lost. You can always buy a new licence afterwards. (I think you get 30 days or so to activate before it stops working.)
Edited 24 October 2020 10:41 AM by MsT18
jphughan
jphughan
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^ That would depend on license pricing. Win10 Pro is normally $199 I think, but it is often available for less when purchased with a system, sometimes much less.
Danskeman
Danskeman
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Depending on which version of Office you have, you may run into issues.  With paid versions, you can only have one installation at time and it sometimes refuses to activate saying it is activated on another pc.  MS Support can usually sort this out but you need your original Office key.

This is not an issue with Office 365 as much easier to manage licences online.​​
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