Linux Restoration Archive Server??


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siringo
siringo
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Please move if this post is in the wrong place.

I have a client that wants to repurpose 3 Windows servers.
The data on the servers needs to be retained and the data requires specialised software to read which is installed on the servers.
All servers are image backed up with Reflect.
I'm thinking of building a Linux machine to host the 3 Windows servers so I can run up the images when needed.

The bit I'm stuck on is how do I run up the Windows images on a Linux machine?

What I'm thinking of doing is turning the images into VMs and using KVM or something on the Linux server, so it's just a matter of booting up the Windows server when required.

Will I need any additional Reflect software or licenses for Linux & does Reflect even have Linux clients?

Thanks for any help.

jphughan
jphughan
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Given that Reflect doesn’t run on Linux, it’s unlikely to be helpful to you, except possibly indirectly. If you wanted to use it, you’d have to plan to use a VM hypervisor that ran on both Windows and Linux, or at least a hypervisor that supported a virtual disk file format that could be used in both Windows and Linux. The idea here is that you would capture an image of your Windows system, then restore it to a virtual disk, mounted on your Reflect system, that was hosted in a virtual disk file format that would be usable by your Linux-based hypervisor. And then you’d use that file as the hard disk for your VM.

The next step you might need to perform would be to boot the VM into Reflect Rescue Media (have Reflect generate a Rescue Media ISO for this) and run ReDeploy within the VM so that Reflect will modify that Windows environment to boot on the VM’s “hardware” rather than the hardware it was previously running on.

And then the last step would be to install the hypervisor’s guest/integration tools into the VM, if applicable based on the hypervisor you choose.

Note that even after all this you might run into licensing issues with Windows and possibly other applications as a result of the system now running on completely different hardware.

Note also that some hypervisors include P2V (physical to virtual) utilities specifically designed to facilitate this process of moving an OS environment currently running on physical hardware over to a VM running on a particular hypervisor. If you select a hypervisor from a vendor that provides that type of tool, that might simplify this process. But you would still face the potential OS and software licensing issues I mentioned above.
Edited 28 September 2020 2:13 AM by jphughan
siringo
siringo
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jphughan - 28 September 2020 2:11 AM
Given that Reflect doesn’t run on Linux, it’s unlikely to be helpful to you, except possibly indirectly. If you wanted to use it, you’d have to plan to use a VM hypervisor that ran on both Windows and Linux, or at least a hypervisor that supported a virtual disk file format that could be used in both Windows and Linux. The idea here is that you would capture an image of your Windows system, then restore it to a virtual disk, mounted on your Reflect system, that was hosted in a virtual disk file format that would be usable by your Linux-based hypervisor. And then you’d use that file as the hard disk for your VM.

The next step you might need to perform would be to boot the VM into Reflect Rescue Media (have Reflect generate a Rescue Media ISO for this) and run ReDeploy within the VM so that Reflect will modify that Windows environment to boot on the VM’s “hardware” rather than the hardware it was previously running on.

And then the last step would be to install the hypervisor’s guest/integration tools into the VM, if applicable based on the hypervisor you choose.

Note that even after all this you might run into licensing issues with Windows and possibly other applications as a result of the system now running on completely different hardware.

Note also that some hypervisors include P2V (physical to virtual) utilities specifically designed to facilitate this process of moving an OS environment currently running on physical hardware over to a VM running on a particular hypervisor. If you select a hypervisor from a vendor that provides that type of tool, that might simplify this process. But you would still face the potential OS and software licensing issues I mentioned above.

Thanks jphughan, I had lots in my head when I wrote my post, I needed to get something down so I could start a bit of a conversation and begin heading down a path.

You've helped me alot once more.
Thank you.

GO

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