Cloning new Data drive - Do I need to format or prepare it first?


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therealhendrix
therealhendrix
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I'm replacing my internal HDD with a new SSD I bought. I'm going to connect the new SSD first via USB to SATA cable, perform the clone process, then install the new SSD.

Do I need to format or prepare the blank new SSD first before I clone it? Or will Macrium do all of this for me automatically? This is also just a secondary data drive, not my boot drive.

Also, are the default options that are checked all OK to have when doing this? It has intelligent copy with all 3 options, verify file system, rapid delta, and SSD trim enabled by default. So my plan is just to copy over the partitions just as they are on my HDD to the SSD, as they are both 1Tb. The internal HDD has a 16mb unformatted primary partition and then the Data D: drive partition with all of my data on it.

Thanks for any feedback! Hopefully it's that simple and I can just run the clone operation using the default operations and exact partitions.
jphughan
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No prep needed for typical scenarios, and actually any prep you do will typically be blown away anyway. If any existing partition occupies any space that a clone/restore operation will he targeting, then that existing partition gets destroyed. There are some special cases where you might want to stage things beforehand, but they’re rare and wouldn’t apply to your scenario.

Yes the default settings are fine. But if the new SSD has a different capacity than your current drive, you should stage the clone to specify the desired partition sizes upfront rather than trying to sort it out later. To do that requires you to use the drag and drop method of staging Source partitions on the Destination. See the replies I wrote in this thread just today for this exact scenario: https://forum.macrium.com/39178/What-Is-The-Best-Way-To-Restore-From-250-GB-SSD-to-500-GB-SSD
therealhendrix
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Thank you for the reply! Both drives are the exact same size, so I just copied the partitions over exactly how they were by default. I'm cloning the new drive now so hopefully all goes well! 
therealhendrix
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jphughan - 22 August 2020 9:02 PM
No prep needed for typical scenarios, and actually any prep you do will typically be blown away anyway. If any existing partition occupies any space that a clone/restore operation will he targeting, then that existing partition gets destroyed. There are some special cases where you might want to stage things beforehand, but they’re rare and wouldn’t apply to your scenario.Yes the default settings are fine. But if the new SSD has a different capacity than your current drive, you should stage the clone to specify the desired partition sizes upfront rather than trying to sort it out later. To do that requires you to use the drag and drop method of staging Source partitions on the Destination. See the replies I wrote in this thread just today for this exact scenario: https://forum.macrium.com/39178/What-Is-The-Best-Way-To-Restore-From-250-GB-SSD-to-500-GB-SSD

Hey I do have on quick question. The clone process completed and was successful. I can see and access all my data from it while it's connected via the USB cable.

1. The new clone has 3Gb less data on it for some reason. It this because I used intelligent sector copy? Nothing was changed on the internal drive while I did the cloning process.

2. The new clone isn't being recognized by it's model name yet, which is a Samsung 860 Evo. Macrium shows my SKHynix and Seagate drives and their model names, but the clone just has a generic asx150 or something similar. Will my PC detect it as a 860 Evo once I install it internally
jphughan
jphughan
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The capacity difference is because clones performed within Windows are based of VSS snapshots of the source disk.  Snapshots are necessary when cloning a "live" disk in order to ensure data integrity.  Some Windows components remove data from VSS snapshots.  For example, the Windows Search database index is purged from snapshots because it can grow quite large and is automatically rebuilt if it's missing anyway.  System Restore points are also excluded from VSS snapshots.  If you want to include that content, then perform the clone again from the Rescue Media environment, which does not need to use VSS since the source disk won't be "live" in that environment and therefore will clone everything, since VSS-aware components won't have an opportunity to remove content from a snapshot beforehand.

The ASM/ASX name is the vendor (ASMedia) and chipset model of the USB to SATA adapter you're using.  Some such adapters display the model of the adapter, while others pass through the name of the attached disk.  But yes, it will be identified properly once it's installed internally.

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