Add image to clone


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Inspectorbob
Inspectorbob
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I cloned my entire drive of a new computer as a backup.  This was before I added most of my usual programs and data, except for Reflect Home (7) and the usual programs that get installed upon initial startup of a new computer.  There was a lot of free space on the backup drive.  As I added new data, I imaged selected partitions of my computer drive, and had them saved in folders on the root of my backup drive (which contained the clone).  Will this be a concern if I need to use the clone or the image in the future?
Thanks.

Seekforever
Seekforever
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No, the images will just look like files on the disk and the disk will still be bootable as when cloned. The disk will still be accessible if you wish to restore an image.
Edited 17 August 2020 8:02 PM by Seekforever
jphughan
jphughan
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It won't TECHNICALLY create a problem, but I personally would not recommend using the same disk as a clone target and an image backup target, unless you plan to have a separate partition on the clone target disk that you'll be using for general purposes and that will NOT be touched by any clone operations.  But even that is risky since you'd have to remember to stage all future clone jobs in a way that will leave that "data storage" partition intact.  If you want to have a clone so that you have a "spare" disk that you can immediately install internally and use if your main disk fails, then use that disk as a clone target and perform periodic clones to it, where Reflect's "Rapid Delta Clone" feature will come in handy since it will only need to clone changes rather than cloning the entire disk all the time -- but then do NOT also use it for image backups.  If on the other hand you want to use this disk to store image backups so that you can store multiple point-in-time snapshots rather than only a single state, as is the case with a clone, then use it as a typical data storage drive that contains your image backups and possibly other files -- but then do NOT use it as a clone target.  Using the same disk for both purposes, while possible, is just asking for trouble.

Inspectorbob
Inspectorbob
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Thank you both for your responses.  I'm somewhat new to Macrium, so I appreciate your feedback.  Sorry, I should have been a little more specific.  I would not be using this on an on-going basis, or to replace a drive.  It is a one-shot clone of the entire drive as the computer comes from the manufacturer, before installing my program files, then a one-shot image of the drive after all programs are installed, and data files added.  After that, it gets put away for safe-keeping.  My intent is to only use it going forward if I wanted to return the computer to it's factory state (clone), or to return it back to a clean install of all my programs (image).  Ongoing backups are done on a separate drive.
If this is still considered risky, should I move the image from the cloned disk to another drive, and would it create problems if I did so?
Thanks.

jphughan
jphughan
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Why wouldn't you just capture two separate images rather than capturing one state as a clone and the other state as an image?  The only reason you'd really want a clone would be if you wanted to be able to simply move that specific drive into your system and immediately start using it as your replacement for a failed drive.  If you just want to back up the factory state in a way that would allow you to restore it (to a drive other than the one where the image is stored), then you can just make two image backups.  That would be a lot easier to deal with, since in that case you just have two files to store on that drive, and thus you can easily use that drive for storing other data, as opposed to that drive needing to have the same partition structure as your clone source drive.

Inspectorbob
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jphughan - 18 August 2020 2:51 AM
Why wouldn't you just capture two separate images rather than capturing one state as a clone and the other state as an image?  The only reason you'd really want a clone would be if you wanted to be able to simply move that specific drive into your system and immediately start using it as your replacement for a failed drive.  If you just want to back up the factory state in a way that would allow you to restore it (to a drive other than the one where the image is stored), then you can just make two image backups.  That would be a lot easier to deal with, since in that case you just have two files to store on that drive, and thus you can easily use that drive for storing other data, as opposed to that drive needing to have the same partition structure as your clone source drive.
Excellent point!  Makes a lot more sense.  I originally started doing it this way using another brand of software when I wanted to have access a specific file for folder off the clone.  I totally forgot that I can do that with an image using Macrium.  The 73 year old gray matter is getting a little mushy Thank you!

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