Cloned to new disk, booted off new disk, old disk still has "Boot" option in Disk Mgmt


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benjamingslade
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On Windows 10, looking at the output from my Disk Management utility:

I used Macrium Reflect to clone form Disk 0 to Disk 2.  When copying the C: partition, I specified a larger size for the destination (which became the E: drive)
I then told my BIOS to boot off Disk 2.   Things seem to boot fine.
But how come the new E drive doesn't have the "Boot" option?
I searched around and found the bcdboot command.   I ran the following:
bcdboot c:\windows /s e:

which said it worked.   I then rebooted, but still the E: drive doesn't have the Boot option.
Here are details about the new disk from the "diskpart" utility:

DISKPART> detail disk

CT1000MX500SSD1
Disk ID: E813AE36
Type : SATA
Status : Online
Path : 4
Target : 0
LUN ID : 0
Location Path : PCIROOT(0)#PCI(1F02)#ATA(C04T00L00)
Current Read-only State : No
Read-only : No
Boot Disk : No
Pagefile Disk : No
Hibernation File Disk : No
Crashdump Disk : No
Clustered Disk : No

Volume ### Ltr Label   Fs  Type   Size  Status  Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
Volume 3   SYSTEM RESE NTFS Partition  100 MB Healthy  System
Volume 4  E Acer   NTFS Partition  930 GB Healthy


How to I make the new disk the Windows bootable disk?
Thanks in advance
Ben
jphughan
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Have you tried just removing the original disk and booting from the second? Even if you intend to repurpose the original disk, after a clone it’s not a bad idea to allow the first boot to occur with only the new disk attached. And if that fails, boot into Rescue still with only the new disk attached and run Fix Boot Problems. Maybe the EFI partition you cloned actually has a BCD entry still pointing to the original disk, so even if you boot from Disk 2 to get to Windows Boot Loader, that may have turned around and loaded Windows from Disk 1? Given that the C drive is still the partition on Disk 1, that may be what’s going on. Fix Boot Problems will update the EFI Partition on the cloned disk to point to its own Windows partition.

You should also clone the Recovery partition after the Windows partition.
Edited 8 July 2020 3:01 PM by jphughan
benjamingslade
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jphughan - 8 July 2020 2:57 PM
Have you tried just removing the original disk and booting from the second? Even if you intend to repurpose the original disk, after a clone it’s not a bad idea to allow the first boot to occur with only the new disk attached. And if that fails, boot into Rescue still with only the new disk attached and run Fix Boot Problems. Maybe the EFI partition you cloned actually has a BCD entry still pointing to the original disk, so even if you boot from Disk 2 to get to Windows Boot Loader, that may have turned around and loaded Windows from Disk 1? Given that the C drive is still the partition on Disk 1, that may be what’s going on. Fix Boot Problems will update the EFI Partition on the cloned disk to point to its own Windows partition.

You should also clone the Recovery partition after the Windows partition.

Re: detach the old disk and try and boot (running Fix Boot Problems, if necessary)
Sounds reasonable.  I'll give this a try.

Re: You should also clone the Recovery partition after the Windows partition.
My original C: disk had two recovery partitions.  The new E: disk has only 1 recovery partition, before the Windows partition.   Are you saying I should I should've cloned the 2nd recovery partition and skipped the first?

Thanks in advance

jphughan
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I'm not sure what that 1GB Recovery partition is.  It's definitely larger than Windows would have created on its own, so I figured that Acer might have created that manually and then added some stuff to it.  But when you have a Recovery partition at the beginning of the disk and one immediately after your Windows partition, then the latter is typically the one that Windows is set up to use in a system recovery scenario.  The reason is that ever since Windows 7 (or maybe Vista?), Windows Setup created the Recovery partition at the beginning of the disk so that your C partition would always be last -- which was handy for cloning to larger or smaller disks.  The problem became that new releases of Windows 10 sometimes required larger Recovery partitions, and when the Recovery partition is the first one on the disk, there isn't a way to simply extend it.  So Microsoft's solution to that situation was to have the Windows 10 release upgrade process shrink your C partition by the amount required for a new Recovery partition and create a new one in that freed up space.  At that point the old Recovery partition became dead weight, since it wasn't needed but it wasn't in a location on disk that allowed its capacity to be easily repurposed.  And then going forward, now that the Recovery partition is immediately after the C partition, further expansions can be achieved by shrinking the C partition by the additional amount necessary rather than having to create an entirely new partition.  Starting with Windows 10 2004, the Windows Setup application itself defaults to creating the Recovery partition after the Windows partition upfront.

If you want to see which of your Recovery partitions is active, then while still booting from Disk 1, open an elevated Command Prompt and run "reagentc /info".  Check the partition number in the target path.

Nick
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benjamingslade - 8 July 2020 2:02 PM
On Windows 10, looking at the output from my Disk Management utility:

I used Macrium Reflect to clone form Disk 0 to Disk 2.  When copying the C: partition, I specified a larger size for the destination (which became the E: drive)
I then told my BIOS to boot off Disk 2.   Things seem to boot fine.
But how come the new E drive doesn't have the "Boot" option?
I searched around and found the bcdboot command.   I ran the following:
bcdboot c:\windows /s e:

which said it worked.   I then rebooted, but still the E: drive doesn't have the Boot option.
Here are details about the new disk from the "diskpart" utility:

DISKPART> detail disk

CT1000MX500SSD1
Disk ID: E813AE36
Type : SATA
Status : Online
Path : 4
Target : 0
LUN ID : 0
Location Path : PCIROOT(0)#PCI(1F02)#ATA(C04T00L00)
Current Read-only State : No
Read-only : No
Boot Disk : No
Pagefile Disk : No
Hibernation File Disk : No
Crashdump Disk : No
Clustered Disk : No

Volume ### Ltr Label   Fs  Type   Size  Status  Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
Volume 3   SYSTEM RESE NTFS Partition  100 MB Healthy  System
Volume 4  E Acer   NTFS Partition  930 GB Healthy


How to I make the new disk the Windows bootable disk?
Thanks in advance
Ben

Hi Ben, Thanks for posting. 

FYI: If you have multiple boot disks attached then the disk actually used to boot is determined by the boot order in the system BIOS.

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

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benjamingslade
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jphughan, thanks for the impressive/scary amount of information and history on the setup of Windows recovery partitions

If you want to see which of your Recovery partitions is active, then while still booting from Disk 1, open an elevated Command Prompt and run "reagentc /info".


And the answer is, harddisk0\partition3, which is sort of confusing because according the Disk Management and diskpart, partition 3 is the main boot partition. 


PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> reagentc /info
Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) and system reset configuration
Information:

Windows RE status: Enabled
Windows RE location: \\?\GLOBALROOT\device\harddisk0\partition3\Recovery\WindowsRE
Boot Configuration Data (BCD) identifier: a01c33a1-b31e-11e9-a7cb-a0884a694eb5
Recovery image location:
Recovery image index: 0
Custom image location:
Custom image index: 0

REAGENTC.EXE: Operation Successful.


Ahhh, but looking at System Information -> Components -> Storage -> Disks -> Model=<the right one> ->  Partition entries

I see that partition numbering is zero based at this lower level.  Nothin's easy.

So I definitely want the recovery partition after the Windows partition.  Got it.


jphughan
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Well you're right about things not being easy, but there's more to the story.  I'd actually never looked at partitions in System Configuration, but you're right that partitions are zero-indexed there.  That's surprising to me because the Diskpart utility built into Windows starts its partition numbering at 1 -- even though it starts its DISK numbering at 0.  The PowerShell "Get-Partition" cmdlet also starts its partition numbering at 1.  Making things more exciting, the Disk Management snap-in actually HIDES the Microsoft Reserved partition that is typically 16-128 MB and located immediately after the EFI System Partition, so you can't even count reliably using Disk Management's "map".  If you open Reflect and look at its "Create a backup" tab, you'll see the disk's true partition layout.  But REFLECT also numbers its DISKS beginning with 1, so Disk 1 in Reflect would be Disk 0 according to Windows.

Oh, and regardless of your partition numbering index, partition numbering is based on order of creation, which does not always correspond to partition sequence on disk. If you have 4 partitions on your disk, shrink Partition 3, and create a new one in that space, your partition numbering on that disk from left to right would be 1, 2, 3, 5, 4.

Having fun yet? Smile

All that said, on my own systems that only have one Recovery partition that is definitely configured properly, the partition number in ReagentC is correct when starting the partition count at 1, not zero.  It is technically possible, though not ideal, for the Windows Recovery files to be stored on the actual Windows partition, so the Partition 3 portion of your path may be referring to that and may be correct in doing so.  I don't know how that setup actually happens, but I've seen systems that are set up that way.  Do you have a \Recovery folder at the root of your C partition?  If so, you might not be able to browse into it, and even if you could you wouldn't normally see anything because the contents have both the Hidden and System attributes set.

If you really wanted to move those files elsewhere, I could provide some commands that would properly "tag" a new Recovery partition located after your C partition, move those files over there, and register that as the Windows Recovery location, but if you're a regular Reflect user, then your odds of needing that in the first place are admittedly slim.  And it seems that Windows feature updates will sometimes automatically configure a Recovery partition as part of the upgrade anyway, so even if you don't create one, you might find one day that it's been created for you.

Edited 8 July 2020 5:45 PM by jphughan
benjamingslade
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Re: Do you have a \Recovery folder at the root of your C partition?

Well, actually, I do, and there is stuff in it, with fairly recent dates.   So maybe my "reagentc /info" output saying "harddisk0\partition3" really did mean 3 out of 1-4


PS C:\> Get-ChildItem c:\Recovery -Attributes Hidden

  Directory: C:\Recovery

Mode      LastWriteTime   Length Name
----      -------------   ------ ----
d--hs-   7/3/2020 12:04 PM      Logs
d--hs-   7/3/2020 3:54 PM      WindowsRE


In anycase, I'm going to reclone disk 0 to disk 2, dropping the first "Recovery" partition, but keeping the 2nd one (and maybe enlarging the 2nd one, just a little bit, for good luck)
Then I'll shutdown, disk connect the old disk 0, try and boot, fail, and run "repair boot problems".  Wish me luck
benjamingslade
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Not to beat this to death, but c:\Recovery\Logs contains only very old log files.  So maybe c:\Recovery is some old left over cruft.
jphughan
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The real test is whether you have a Winre.wim file in your \Recovery\WindowsRE folder.  If so, then that's where your WinRE environment lives.  Again, by default it is marked as both Hidden and System, so you'd need to have "Hide protected operating system files" unchecked in your Folder Options or possibly include special parameters in directory listing commands to see them.

GO

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