Cloning from 1TB drive to 4TB


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happytriger2000
happytriger2000
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Hi all, I'm Freddy Chang and this is my 1st post!!
Here is a picture of my C drive under disk management:

I cloned the C drive entirely with the same arrangement, 100MB, 930.8GB, 628MB, in order to expand c partition I have to either delete the 628MB partition of move it to the front, but if I do that the cloned disk won't boot, any ideas how to clone the source disk and expand C partition?

Thanks,
jphughan
jphughan
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Given that you have already performed the clone, it would be faster to do this:
  • Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition
  • Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
  • Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
  • Restore that partition from the Reflect image into that small space.  You'll need to drag and drop the partition from the Source to the empty area in the Destination area rather than clicking "Copy selected partition" in this case.
As long as you do all of the above without restarting, you will be fine.  I've done it myself.

But for future reference, you can specify that cloned partitions should be larger or smaller while "staging" the clone by looking at Steps 4 and 5 of this article.  If you had done that, then Reflect would have extended your C partition during the clone operation itself.

Edited 28 June 2020 3:39 PM by jphughan
jphughan
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One additional note.  That 628 MB partition is probably your Windows Recovery partition.  If that partition is already after your C partition, you generally do NOT want to move it to the front of the disk.  That's where Windows used to put that partition and Microsoft is now putting it after the C partition.  The reason is that sometimes Windows 10 updates need larger Recovery partitions.  When the Recovery partition is after C, then it can just shrink your C partition slightly to create more space for a larger Recovery partition.  If your Recovery partition is at the front, then it has to shrink your C partition by the entire amount needed for a new Recovery partition and then your Recovery partition at the front becomes useless.  Moving your Windows Recovery partition can also break Windows Recovery, which in some cases can render your system unbootable, as you found.  But hopefully one of the methods I described above will help

happytriger2000
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Thanks for replying!!.
Ok, I follwed your instructions:
1- Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition 
image captured and saved.
2- Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
Deleted 628MB partition using Diskpart in CMD and Delete Partition Override was used.
3-Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
I managed to expand extra 1T, there are 1678.02GB left which cannot be used for expansion, don't kow why...



I'm currently stuck at this point....
Nick
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happytriger2000 - 28 June 2020 8:27 PM
Thanks for replying!!.
Ok, I follwed your instructions:
1- Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition 
image captured and saved.
2- Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
Deleted 628MB partition using Diskpart in CMD and Delete Partition Override was used.
3-Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
I managed to expand extra 1T, there are 1678.02GB left which cannot be used for expansion, don't kow why...



I'm currently stuck at this point....

Thanks for posting.

It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929

Your second clone replicated the legacy MBR layout of the source disk as the C drive was not expanded during the clone/restore operation. The target disk is now legacy MBR and cannot be partitioned beyond 2.2 TB. This is why the Windows Disk Management console is showing the partitioning options greyed out. 

If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

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Edited 28 June 2020 9:58 PM by Nick
happytriger2000
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Nick - 28 June 2020 9:16 PM
happytriger2000 - 28 June 2020 8:27 PM
Thanks for replying!!.
Ok, I follwed your instructions:
1- Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition 
image captured and saved.
2- Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
Deleted 628MB partition using Diskpart in CMD and Delete Partition Override was used.
3-Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
I managed to expand extra 1T, there are 1678.02GB left which cannot be used for expansion, don't kow why...



I'm currently stuck at this point....

Thanks for posting.

It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929

Your second clone replicated the legacy MBR layout of the source disk as the C drive was not expanded during the clone/restore operation. The target disk is now legacy MBR and cannot be partitioned beyond 2.2 TB. This is why the Windows Disk Management console is showing the partitioning options greyed out. 

If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.

@Nick, Thanks for the tips!.
1-
It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Yes it is MBR and is limited to 2TB max, acknowledged!

2 -
Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.

Had a look at this link: https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929
If I do exactly the following:



and drag the partition C to the destination as shown above, will it work? 

3-
If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.



Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10
1. In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows\Panther, you will see a file named setupact.log.

2. Open the setupact.log file with notepad, click Ctrl + F to open the Find dialog, enter Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment: in the Find dialog to search for a line begin with Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment:.

It is currently in BIOS mode or Legacy mode. I have downloaded the Bios update .cap file from ASUS for H87M-Plus will update BIOS later.

Nick
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happytriger2000 - 29 June 2020 7:58 AM
Nick - 28 June 2020 9:16 PM
happytriger2000 - 28 June 2020 8:27 PM
Thanks for replying!!.
Ok, I follwed your instructions:
1- Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition 
image captured and saved.
2- Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
Deleted 628MB partition using Diskpart in CMD and Delete Partition Override was used.
3-Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
I managed to expand extra 1T, there are 1678.02GB left which cannot be used for expansion, don't kow why...



I'm currently stuck at this point....

Thanks for posting.

It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929

Your second clone replicated the legacy MBR layout of the source disk as the C drive was not expanded during the clone/restore operation. The target disk is now legacy MBR and cannot be partitioned beyond 2.2 TB. This is why the Windows Disk Management console is showing the partitioning options greyed out. 

If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.

@Nick, Thanks for the tips!.
1-
It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Yes it is MBR and is limited to 2TB max, acknowledged!

2 -
Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.

Had a look at this link: https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929
If I do exactly the following:



and drag the partition C to the destination as shown above, will it work? 

3-
If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.



Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10
1. In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows\Panther, you will see a file named setupact.log.

2. Open the setupact.log file with notepad, click Ctrl + F to open the Find dialog, enter Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment: in the Find dialog to search for a line begin with Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment:.

It is currently in BIOS mode or Legacy mode. I have downloaded the Bios update .cap file from ASUS for H87M-Plus will update BIOS later.

Thanks for getting back. 

and drag the partition C to the destination as shown above, will it work?


You'll also need to follow the last step (16) in the KB article above and run 'Fix boot problems' (linked below)
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW72/Fixing+Windows+boot+problems

Please ensure that your rescue media is booted in UEFI mode as indicated in the article.

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

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happytriger2000
happytriger2000
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Nick - 29 June 2020 9:01 AM
happytriger2000 - 29 June 2020 7:58 AM
Nick - 28 June 2020 9:16 PM
happytriger2000 - 28 June 2020 8:27 PM
Thanks for replying!!.
Ok, I follwed your instructions:
1- Use Reflect to capture an image of just that small partition 
image captured and saved.
2- Delete that small partition (you might need to use the "delete partition override" command in Diskpart for Windows to allow you to delete it)
Deleted 628MB partition using Diskpart in CMD and Delete Partition Override was used.
3-Extend your C partition so that there is only 628 MB left at the end of the disk
I managed to expand extra 1T, there are 1678.02GB left which cannot be used for expansion, don't kow why...



I'm currently stuck at this point....

Thanks for posting.

It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929

Your second clone replicated the legacy MBR layout of the source disk as the C drive was not expanded during the clone/restore operation. The target disk is now legacy MBR and cannot be partitioned beyond 2.2 TB. This is why the Windows Disk Management console is showing the partitioning options greyed out. 

If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.

@Nick, Thanks for the tips!.
1-
It appears that your source disk is a legacy MBR style disk and you are cloning to a 4 TB disk. MBR systems cannot boot from disks larger than approximately 2.2 TB (2**32 × 512 bytes)

Yes it is MBR and is limited to 2TB max, acknowledged!

2 -
Your initial clone converted the target disk to GPT style as C was extended beyond the MBR threshold. This is why it wouldn't boot. Even if your BIOS is capable of booting a GPT disk, there are other steps required to convert an MBR to GPT boot disk.

Had a look at this link: https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=23396929
If I do exactly the following:



and drag the partition C to the destination as shown above, will it work? 

3-
If your system motherboard/BIOS is capable of GPT/UEFI booting a disk larger than 2.2 TB then you can follow the instructions in the KB link above.

If your system motherboard/BIOS isn't capable of GPT/UEFI booting then I'm afraid you cannot use the full capacity of the 4 TB as a boot disk.



Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10
1. In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows\Panther, you will see a file named setupact.log.

2. Open the setupact.log file with notepad, click Ctrl + F to open the Find dialog, enter Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment: in the Find dialog to search for a line begin with Callback_BootEnvironmentDetect: Detected boot environment:.

It is currently in BIOS mode or Legacy mode. I have downloaded the Bios update .cap file from ASUS for H87M-Plus will update BIOS later.

Thanks for getting back. 

and drag the partition C to the destination as shown above, will it work?


You'll also need to follow the last step (16) in the KB article above and run 'Fix boot problems' (linked below)
https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW72/Fixing+Windows+boot+problems

Please ensure that your rescue media is booted in UEFI mode as indicated in the article.

The picture below shows the C partition had been dragged to the destination Disk and restored.



This morning I created a Rescue Media on to a USB flash, restart pc, boot from USB and followed on screen instruction.
After "Fix Boot problems for GPT/UEFI Boot Systems" is done, reboot pc enter Bios and boot from Destination Disk(Toshiba 4T) and I get this:


What should I do from here?


jphughan
jphughan
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You shouldn't have two "Unformatted Primary" partitions.  Windows creates the 16 MB partition at the beginning by default if you convert a disk to GPT format, but on a GPT disk that will host an OS, you only need the 128 MB partition that exists after the FAT32 EFI System partition.  Notice that in the guide that Nick linked for performing a custom restore, the destination disk has the EFI System Partition at the beginning of the disk, and then the Unformatted Primary partition.  I'm not sure if that's the cause of your problem, but what you have isn't the way that a GPT disk containing a Windows installation is supposed to be set up.

Also, did you perform the clone within Windows?  The instructions in the guide that Nick linked specifically say to boot into Windows PE (Rescue Media) as the first step, and then do everything there.  That might be the only way to avoid that initial Unformatted Primary partition.  That partition doesn't get created when you convert a disk to GPT in Windows PE.  But it DOES get created if you perform that conversion in full Windows.  So boot into Rescue Media FIRST, then perform all of the destination disk preparation and cloning there.

Edited 30 June 2020 4:20 AM by jphughan
jphughan
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One more thing.  You didn't clone the Recovery partition after the C partition on your source disk down to your destination. You should clone that too.  You can choose to increase the size of your C partition during the clone, fyi.  See Steps 4 and 5 of this article for how to do that.  After dragging the C partition down from your source to destination, click "Cloned Partition Properties" and set the Free value of the partition to 628 MB.  That will resize your C partition to leave 628 MB free at the end of the disk, leaving you just enough space to drag down that Recovery partition from the source to the destination.  Run the clone, THEN run Fix Boot Problems -- again, make sure your Rescue Media was booted in UEFI mode to do that.  You can verify this by checking the title bar at the very top of your Rescue Media environment.  It should say "[UEFI]" at the end.

Edited 30 June 2020 4:20 AM by jphughan
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