Moving the Windows partition from one SSD to another SSD that has System Reserved Partition


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spilly80
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jphughan - 1 March 2021 9:01 PM
Hey Spilly,

I can see two places where you may have gone wrong that probably didn't help matters.

First, switching to Legacy Boot in order to boot Rescue.  That should not have been necessary.  If your Rescue Media was built on WinPE/RE 4 later (this is indicated in the title bar at the very top of the Rescue interface), then it supports UEFI booting, and if you have a CD containing a bootable environment that supports UEFI mode, then you should be able to boot it in UEFI mode.  The reason this can matter is that the fixes attempted by Fix Boot Problems depend on how the Rescue Media itself was booted.  So you essentially attempted Legacy BIOS fixes on a UEFI installation of Windows.

The other change I'd make to your setup is to run Fix Boot Problems and perform your first test boot without the source HDD connected.  This might mean that you need to perform the clone, then shut down, then disconnect the HDD, then boot into Rescue AGAIN specifically to run Fix Boot Problems so that Reflect will only see a single Windows environment.  And then your system will only see a single bootable disk when you reboot after that.

And as a last note, if you moved from a SATA HDD to an NVMe SSD rather than a SATA SSD, then you may also have to run ReDeploy in the Rescue environment so that Reflect updates the Windows environment as needed to load the NVMe class driver at startup.  Make sure you're using Rescue Media created by a reasonably recent version of Reflect since Macrium made some ReDeploy enhancements recently.

Good luck!

What a helpful reply! And QUICK too

1) Legacy boot. 
It was an official HP article that misled me, possibly an early issue as I didn't filter on date
I felt a little uncomfortable during all the UEFI hassle, as I do this v. rarely, yet I felt sure you should just tap F9 and you get the boot options
You are confirming that's so. Great! That feels right.

2) Fix Boot.
I reckon the SSD windows has not been touched since it was cloned
So I shall try Rescue Boot and straight in Fix Boot; all done in UEFI mode
It either works or it doesn't. I'll soon know.
If fails, I'll re-clone from macrium backup... No sweat

3) It is a SATA SSD, not NvMe, so I think I'm OK.  Not that I knew about the NVMe driver issue though

This is actually a friend's PC, and my own is working OK, which helps

I was all cocky this morning, and it all went pear shaped.
Your reply has restored my confidence. I wasn't that far off.
And I've learned something about hidden implications of UEFI v Legacy too

Ten out of Ten to you and the forum I think
- but I won't really know for sure till I try it!!

Spilly




Wild Willy Kredentser
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I was searching for an explanation of why one of my recovery partitions appears as red.  This discussion shows an example of a red partition.  Here's mine:



In my case, & as far as I can tell in the case of the original poster here, the red partition is the recovery partition.  I believe the original poster has 2 recovery partitions, same as I do.  I have been advised (on elevenforum) that I have 2 recovery partitions because I have done a Repair Install.  The slightly larger one is active. the one Reflect gives the number 4 in my image.  The other recovery partition, at the end of the drive, is the original one that got installed with the original W11 installation.

The advice I've gotten is that the original recovery partition at the end of the drive is no longer used.  It can safely be removed.  I was planning on using Reflect rescue media to take an image of this drive, minus the useless recovery parttion, then restore the image using an enlarged C-drive.  The point is to remove the unused recovery partition & expand the usable partition, the one that contains my actual W11 boot partition, C-drive, so I have no dead space on the drive.  I will thus reduce this 5-partition drive to a 4-partition configuration.  I assume this is eminently doable.

But my question is why is the used space there colored red?

Edited 16 December 2023 11:00 AM by Wild Willy Kredentser
capair45
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Wild Willy Kredentser - 16 December 2023 10:51 AM
I was searching for an explanation of why one of my recovery partitions appears as red.  This discussion shows an example of a red partition.  Here's mine:



In my case, & as far as I can tell in the case of the original poster here, the red partition is the recovery partition.  I believe the original poster has 2 recovery partitions, same as I do.  I have been advised (on elevenforum) that I have 2 recovery partitions because I have done a Repair Install.  The slightly larger one is active. the one Reflect gives the number 4 in my image.  The other recovery partition, at the end of the drive, is the original one that got installed with the original W11 installation.

The advice I've gotten is that the original recovery partition at the end of the drive is no longer used.  It can safely be removed.  I was planning on using Reflect rescue media to take an image of this drive, minus the useless recovery parttion, then restore the image using an enlarged C-drive.  The point is to remove the unused recovery partition & expand the usable partition, the one that contains my actual W11 boot partition, C-drive, so I have no dead space on the drive.  I will thus reduce this 5-partition drive to a 4-partition configuration.  I assume this is eminently doable.

But my question is why is the used space there colored red?

Red means the partition is almost full. It is fairly typical for that partition to be near its limit. The space that is used on that partition is used by the WIM recovery file.  Sometimes, Windows needs to create a larger WIM file on that partition and will reduce the size of the /C partition and use that space to increase the size of the recovery partition.




Windows 10 Home (22H2)  Build 19045.4046 (Desktop)
Windows 11 Home (23H2)  Build 22631.3155 (Laptop)
Macrium Reflect 8.1.7847



spilly80
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1. The Red in File explorer is to warn you that the free space is below a recommended minimum
You can obviously ignore it for fixed space partitions such as Win Recovery

2. If you use DISKPART you can check the TYPE field of both partitions
The Command is DETAIL PART
If they are both type   de94bba4-06d1-4d40-a16a-bfd50179d6ac  , you can be certain that you have two recovery partitions

As you have a 2TB SSD, you really don't need the tiny little bit of space occupied by the 2nd recovery partition
But you might want to remove the 2nd partition just for the sake of tidiness

You can do this in DiskPart,
You'll need the OVERRIDE option, so make sure you know what you are doing

Then you will be left with a little bit of unusable free space at the end of the drive
You will need a 3rd party partition tool (Mini Tool Partition Wizard or similar)  to MOVE
the recovery partition to the very end of the drive

Only then can you extend C: into the space

Note: The moved recovery partition will still function correctly
as it is identified by the TYPE as listed above, not by its name or position on the disk

I'd not bother to do all this myself

spilly

Wild Willy Kredentser
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Thanks for your responses.  I was worried it was flagging corruption in the partition or something actually serious like that.  I think it would be more intuitive if the red were on the free space in the graphic instead of on the used space.

jphughan
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The plan is sound if you truly want to expend the effort just to add that amount of capacity to your Windows partition. If you capture an image that omits that second Recovery partition, then in the first step of the restore wizard, clicking Copy Partitions > Fit to disk should auto-generate the desired outcome in terms of sizing, since Reflect knows not to resize the EFI, MSR, and Recovery partitions.

As noted, red denotes that the partition is nearly full, but that’s completely fine and rather common on Windows Recovery partitions. If Windows needs more capacity there, it will shrink your Windows partition to free up additional capacity for that purpose.
jphughan
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In fairness to Reflect, Windows uses exactly the same depiction when a volume is near capacity, namely showing the used capacity in red.
Wild Willy Kredentser
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Thanks JP.  I actually reorganized my boot drive on Windows 7 a few months ago using Reflect, so I already have some experience with the process.  But W7 didn't have this silliness with a recovery partition & a completely ridiculous partition of just 16M.  Oh well.  It is what it is.  I think I can deal with it.

The reason for getting rid of an unused & unusable recovery partition is that if I have to do another Repair Install in future, it will likely proliferate yet another recovery partition.  I mean, with each new release, the recovery partition is likely to require more room than it did, so it will keep inserting a new recovery partition in front of the existing one & chewing away a bit of space on the back end of the boot partition.  But I have read that certain system maintenance can also create a new recovery partition & leave the old useless one in place.  So there's multiple ways to acquire a new one.

It seems completely silly the way they do it.  The old recovery partition is immediately invalidated when the new one appears.  They already trim the boot partition to make room for the new recovery partition.  They should just overlay the old recovery partition with the new one.  That way, they wouldn't have to shrink the boot partition by as much as the way they do it now.  It is so disappointing that they didn't think of that on their own.  Maybe some day they will do it right.  For now, Reflect can correct the situation.  It's not just an issue of reclaiming what is admittedly a paltry amount of space.  It's a question of avoiding unnecessary complexity.  There's already quite enough complexity without this.

This is all part of my learning curve.  I've been using W11 for only a couple of weeks.  A time will come soon enough when I will have the most ferocious of the beasts tamed & I won't be so active on here.

jphughan
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When the Recovery partition is immediately after the Windows partition, Windows typically does NOT keep adding new ones. It just shrinks the Windows partition and recreates the Recovery partition to use the space it freed up there. I’m not sure how/why you ended up with two consecutive Recovery partitions. Most people with two have the first one at the beginning of the disk because that’s where Windows created it during fresh installs until Win10 2004, even though Microsoft had seen the need for expanding the Recovery partition well before that point in Win10’s lifecycle.
dbminter
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When I updated to Windows 11 22H2, it created a 2nd new Recovery partition right after the Windows one.  So, I now have 2 "Recovery" partitions right after the Windows one.  I tried removing the other and while that initially didn't present an issue, it eventually caused me a problem where Rescue Media was always the RE version most recently behind the most current one.  So, after "fixing" that, I just left both Recovery partitions alone.

GO

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