cloned source disk information to my new nvme 1tb m.2


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michael
michael
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hi all.
new member and happy to be here. 
I've just recently purchased the Macrium home edition so excuse my newbie presentation.   I've successfully ​cloned my old crucial bx500 sata ssd to my new xpg 1tb m.2 ssd but noticed my new primary m.2 boot drive shows (I believe) the old crucial bx500s storage and name.
​I removed the old ssd and the information for the xpg m.2 stays the same in this pc and properties. cloned crucial bx500 is 480g storage capacity and the xpg m.2 is 1tb.   All photos uploaded are of my computers current state with only the 1tb m.2.

not sure how to correct my primary m.2 or what I've done wrong.  any help much appreciated, thanks.​​​
jphughan
jphughan
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Nothing went wrong.  The "SATA Solid State Drive" field is just the volume label field.  Reflect clones the source volume labels to the destination volumes, but you can set those to whatever you like, or even set it to nothing at all, which is the default.  Some people label their volumes based on their purpose, e.g. "OS", "My Data", "Secret Stuff", etc.  And technically since it's a label for your C partition and not the entire disk, it might actually be appropriate to label it based on the contents/function of that volume rather than the underlying hardware.  But in any case, it's completely arbitrary, quick to change if desired, and not at all an indication that anything went wrong.  Reflect just has no way of knowing whether that label will still make sense when cloned to a new target.

If you look at your Reflect screenshot, you'll notice that the "GPT Disk 1" line directly above the partition map correctly identifies the model of your NVMe SSD.

Edited 6 May 2020 2:03 PM by jphughan
jphughan
jphughan
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One additional note: You've got a huge chunk of unallocated space after your C partition.  Unless you plan to use that for some other purpose, you might want to extend your C partition to use that space, otherwise you won't be able to use it at all.  Windows Disk Management can do that.  Technically that could have been done when "staging" the clone, since Reflect allows you to specify that the destination "instance" of a cloned partition should be a different size relative to the source (Steps 4 and 5 of this KB article), and if you had a more recent Windows 10 partition layout where the Recovery partition was located AFTER your C partition, then that would have been important to do upfront, because with that partition layout you wouldn't have been able to extend your C partition to fill that space afterward since the Recovery partition would have been sitting between the C partition and the empty space.  But since your C partition is the last one on disk, a post-clone extension is possible. Smile

Edited 6 May 2020 2:07 PM by jphughan
michael
michael
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jphughan - 6 May 2020 2:07 PM
One additional note: You've got a huge chunk of unallocated space after your C partition.  Unless you plan to use that for some other purpose, you might want to extend your C partition to use that space, otherwise you won't be able to use it at all.  Windows Disk Management can do that.  Technically that could have been done when "staging" the clone, since Reflect allows you to specify that the destination "instance" of a cloned partition should be a different size relative to the source (Steps 4 and 5 of this KB article), and if you had a more recent Windows 10 partition layout where the Recovery partition was located AFTER your C partition, then that would have been important to do upfront, because with that partition layout you wouldn't have been able to extend your C partition to fill that space afterward since the Recovery partition would have been sitting between the C partition and the empty space.  But since your C partition is the last one on disk, a post-clone extension is possible. Smile

thank you very much for taking the time to explain my issue in detail. I have extended the drive now which was my original intension.  it's a new area of leaning for me and will use this thread to continue my further learnings with this program and my hardware.
GO

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