Use unallocated drive space to create a new second Windows 10 enviroment, How?


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jimlg
jimlg
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I've recently cloned my SSD in my laptop to increase the drive space available, so far so good.
Now I want to make my Windows 10 installation dual boot (Both Windows 10); the reason is that I use this machine for some Media editing work & it'll help a lot to have the second Windows environment running as lean & mean as possible with very few background apps interfering with the available processing power etc; So I have a good amount of unallocated space on the new SSD I want to make a second installation of Windows 10 on a second (new) partition. I’m pretty sure that there are the utilities and features to do this within Reflect Workstation and the Win PE Rescue media? Is there a step by step guide by Macrium on how to do this?

jphughan
jphughan
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Reflect doesn't directly set up dual booting.  Windows handles that.  You just need to download the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool from Microsoft here, use it to create bootable media, boot your PC from that, and step through the installer.  When you get to the choice between Upgrade and Custom, choose the latter, and at the next step where it asks where you want to install it, choose the unallocated space on your disk.  Windows Setup will see your existing Windows installation and add the new one as an additional option within the existing Windows Boot Manager instance so that you'll be able to choose which environment you want to start at any given time.

Needless to say (hopefully), make a Reflect backup before you do this, just in case things go sideways.

Edited 16 April 2020 10:54 PM by jphughan
jimlg
jimlg
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jphughan - 16 April 2020 10:53 PM
Reflect doesn't directly set up dual booting.  Windows handles that.  You just need to download the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool from Microsoft here, use it to create bootable media, boot your PC from that, and step through the installer.  When you get to the choice between Upgrade and Custom, choose the latter, and at the next step where it asks where you want to install it, choose the unallocated space on your disk.  Windows Setup will see your existing Windows installation and add the new one as an additional option within the existing Windows Boot Manager instance so that you'll be able to choose which environment you want to start at any given time.

Needless to say (hopefully), make a Reflect backup before you do this, just in case things go sideways.

Thanks again JP, Very helpful information, I am also intersted to know more about the Redeploy windows installation to new hardware option in the Reflect Win PE recovery enviroment; I'll reaserach that independantly.
jphughan
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Happy to help!  For ReDeploy, very basically, the very first time Windows boots, it performs a full hardware inventory.  After that, for certain boot-critical devices, it just sets itself up to assume that those devices will always be there and to load the right drivers for using those devices.  This cuts down on future boot times compared to performing a full inventory, but it also means that if you change those devices, Windows won't boot anymore.  ReDeploy is able to modify a Windows environment to change the drivers that it loads during boot, including injecting new drivers supplied by the user if needed.  This makes it more likely that a Windows installation set up on one set of hardware will be able to boot on another set of hardware.  It's typically used if you get a new PC and want to migrate your existing PC's environment over to it, although it could be also used if you only changed certain boot-critical hardware within your current PC.

Edited 17 April 2020 2:17 PM by jphughan
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