Question on UEFI


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Chris T
Chris T
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Folks,
I might be a bit naive here, but easily made a rescue CD with the latest Macrium Reflect (MR) Workstation (v7.2.4711) and tested it to boot and be able to see and use my RDX drive backups in the event I loose everything.  So far, everything is working perfectly.

I am used to MR Workstation being used on my older Windows 7 Pro system for years (no problems ever) and had to reconstruct the bootability of my hard drive with that pop-down menu that allows you to "fix" the boot hard drive while running on the rescue CD.  I used it one time and it worked perfectly.

Here's the question...I now have a new system with Windows 10 Pro (64-bit) updated to 19h1 (1909) and I wondered if I had to "fix" my bootable drive, is this doing the correct "fix" now that I have a UEFI GPT SSD system versus the older BIOS MBR harddrive in Windows 7?  Would I now destroy the SSD boot drive partition now that it is an SSD using UEFI and partitioned as a GPT?

Perhaps I am worrying over nothing.  Please let me know...anybody.  Thanks!
Chris


Chris T.

jphughan
jphughan
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If you booted the Rescue Media in Legacy BIOS mode, Fix Boot Problems will attempt fixes appropriate for an OS set up to boot in Legacy BIOS mode.  If you boot the Rescue Media in UEFI mode, it will attempt fixes appropriate for an OS set up to boot in UEFI mode.  The way you can tell how you're booted is the Reflect title bar at the very top of the Rescue Media environment.  If it says "[UEFI]" at the end, you're in UEFI mode.  Otherwise, you're in Legacy BIOS mode.  Rescue Media itself supports being booted either way, and some motherboards when configured in a certain way can boot in either method simultaneously.  Others can only be configured to boot in one mode at any given time.  If you want to prevent your system from accidentally booting in Legacy BIOS mode, then make sure UEFI Secure Boot is enabled, which prevents Legacy BIOS booting.  And Secure Boot is also a nice anti-rootkit protection mechanism anyway.

Chris T
Chris T
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jphughan - 15 February 2020 3:25 AM
If you booted the Rescue Media in Legacy BIOS mode, Fix Boot Problems will attempt fixes appropriate for an OS set up to boot in Legacy BIOS mode.  If you boot the Rescue Media in UEFI mode, it will attempt fixes appropriate for an OS set up to boot in UEFI mode.  The way you can tell how you're booted is the Reflect title bar at the very top of the Rescue Media environment.  If it says "[UEFI]" at the end, you're in UEFI mode.  Otherwise, you're in Legacy BIOS mode.  Rescue Media itself supports being booted either way, and some motherboards when configured in a certain way can boot in either method simultaneously.  Others can only be configured to boot in one mode at any given time.  If you want to prevent your system from accidentally booting in Legacy BIOS mode, then make sure UEFI Secure Boot is enabled, which prevents Legacy BIOS booting.  And Secure Boot is also a nice anti-rootkit protection mechanism anyway.


Hi "JP,"

It does indicate a [UEFI] in the Macrium titlebar.  I also checked my computer's BIOS at startup and it too also indicated a UEFI situation.  No legacy mode existed in the BIOS setup from what I could find.  However, it does offer the "Secure Boot" option for the UEFI, but have been told to not implement as you saw that one of Microsoft's updates caused all kinds of problems for people that used the "secure Boot" option for their UEFI operation.  In particular, it was KB4524244 and was removed from the Microsoft website yesterday due to the thousands of people screaming with unbootable systems and lost user profiles.

Chris


Chris T.

jphughan
jphughan
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I just have missed that news item, but I would still recommend using Secure Boot in general. If it ever causes problems, it can easily be disabled without needing to rebuild anything, but it’s been supported since Windows 8 (and its corresponding WinPE 4 kernel), and it’s a nice anti-rootkit protection mechanism. I’ve had it enabled on all of my PCs since I started using Windows 8 on a PC that supported it.
Edited 16 February 2020 5:05 PM by jphughan
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