Windows 10 Upgrade issues


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jphughan
jphughan
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Interesting! In that case I’ll be very curious to learn underlying cause on this and whether it seems to be a bug in this particular Insider release or the result of a deliberate change by Microsoft.
Nick
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Please see this KB article:

https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW7/Windows+Insider+Preview+17063+BSOD

Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

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Kent Reid
Kent Reid
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I am not technical but, having removed MR and getting Build 17063 to install, apparently MR persists as a scheduled task and stills runs. The HD activity light was flickering at the set time, so I checked task manager and the MR backup process was active. I then checked the partition where the file is sent, and there is a current date backup present. I have now made the change to the registry and will attempt to reinstall MR.
jphughan
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The Reflect uninstaller provides a list of checkboxes asking whether to remove certain things, such as definition files, preferences, and scheduled tasks.  By default those are not checked for convenience in case the user simply needs to uninstall and reinstall Reflect, in which case preserving everything will make that less painful.  If you left the uninstaller at its default settings, that would explain the scheduled tasks still being there, although I'm not sure how Reflect would have actually run after it had been uninstalled, since the application itself would have been uninstalled.

Edited 2 January 2018 3:33 PM by jphughan
Kent Reid
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jphughan - 2 January 2018 3:32 PM
The Reflect uninstaller provides a list of checkboxes asking whether to remove certain things, such as definition files, preferences, and scheduled tasks.  By default those are not checked for convenience in case the user simply needs to uninstall and reinstall Reflect, in which case preserving everything will make that less painful.  If you left the uninstaller at its default settings, that would explain the scheduled tasks still being there, although I'm not sure how Reflect would have actually run after it had been uninstalled, since the application itself would have been uninstalled.

My thinking exactly. The HD activity was the give-away. I have reinstalled MR and the new image is approximately the same size as the ones that "ran" with the program supposedly un-installed. ​I can view those in explorer, and everything seems to be there. I'm not complaining - just slightly baffled. In any case, things are back to normal. Thanks for your assistance.
Kent Reid
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jphughan - 2 January 2018 3:32 PM
The Reflect uninstaller provides a list of checkboxes asking whether to remove certain things, such as definition files, preferences, and scheduled tasks.  By default those are not checked for convenience in case the user simply needs to uninstall and reinstall Reflect, in which case preserving everything will make that less painful.  If you left the uninstaller at its default settings, that would explain the scheduled tasks still being there, although I'm not sure how Reflect would have actually run after it had been uninstalled, since the application itself would have been uninstalled.

Further to my confusion - Windows confirms that I installed MR on January 2. I then browsed the image that was made on Jan 1. Program Files contains a folder named Macrium and it contains a file named reflect.exe. Does that indicate that the program might not have been un-installed at all, but somehow modified sufficiently to allow Build 17063 to install? ​The executable must then have functioned as normal. For reference, this is how I removed MR. Settings - Apps - Apps & Features - Macrium - Uninstall. Is that route less complete than using Control Panel?
jphughan
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Reflect is a fairly small application, so especially after taking image compression into account and all of the other changes that can occur on a Windows partition from day to day that would affect disk consumption, image size doesn't seem like a relevant factor. The bigger question is how Reflect ran at all after you'd uninstalled it.  I've never used the Settings > Apps path to uninstall applications.  I would've guessed that it would call the same underlying functionality as Control Panel > Programs and Features, but especially in light of your experience, that may not be the case.

Mintmag
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What is the purpose of the new partition?
jphughan
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Mintmag - 5 June 2018 6:05 PM
What is the purpose of the new partition?

It takes over as the new Windows Recovery partition.  It's only created when the existing Recovery partition's free space is below the requirements of the new Windows version you're upgrading to.  The original Windows Recovery partition then just sits on your disk uselessly taking up space because it's typically located in an area of the disk that doesn't allow its storage to be easily repurposed elsewhere.

If you're asking what the Windows Recovery partition does, it contains some tools to diagnose and repair issues that might prevent you from booting into Windows, such as Command Prompt, Startup Repair, System Restore, System Image Recovery, etc.  Additionally, on systems that have BitLocker enabled, the necessary files to unlock a BitLocker partition are stored on the Recovery partition (UEFI systems will alternatively store those files on the EFI partition if the Recovery partition doesn't exist.)  Of course for Reflect users, especially those who don't use BitLocker, the Recovery partition serves little to no purpose -- but even if you were to delete the Recovery partition, it would get recreated any time you upgraded to a new release of Windows 10.

Edited 5 June 2018 6:16 PM by jphughan
Mintmag
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Doesn't Windows already have a recovery partition?
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