Can’t find restore password


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I’ve installed and successfully run Reflect 7.2 on a new HP laptop for the past month, and already have a need to retrieve a file from a couple of weeks ago. But when I tried to do so, entering the password I thought I had set up (which still works for logging into this forum), it said it wasn’t the correct password. Apparently I had chosen a different one for IMG protection when setting it up, but I have no recollection or record of having done so. Is there a way to recover from this, or can I only delete the backup files and start a fresh backup set, thus loosing the file I wanted back? By the way, I get the same incorrect-password error message regardless of whether I’m using Reflect or Win 10 File Explorer. And trying to change the password in the Reflect Default / Password window or unchecking the box ‘Enable password protection’ (without first entering the correct password) has no effect, which admittedly is a good feature.

So if anyone knows a way I can access the backup file I wanted, like asking a Reflect support person to remote into my computer and opening it with some master password (which they could potentially do since I have Windows 10 Pro), please let me know. Thanks guys.


jphughan
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If you don't know the password, then the data is effectively lost.  There's no master password within Windows or Reflect itself or any sort of reset/forgotten password mechanism.  If you think you might remember your password later, it would be worth keeping those backups for a while, but you should absolutely start a new backup set with a known password right away.

Also note that changing the password and encryption settings in Edit Defaults only affects brand new definition files created after the change.  It will not change the password on any existing definition files (even if you subsequently make other changes to them), and it certainly wouldn't change the password on any actual backups you had previously created.  I personally would recommend against setting a password in Edit Defaults because if you ever create a one-off backup, that password will be applied and you might not intend that or remember the password later.  If you want to change the password for a definition file you're already using, go to the Backup Definition Files tab, right-click the definition file that runs your job(s), select Edit, click Advanced Options, and change the password there -- and then create a new Full backup, because Diff and Inc backups always maintain the password of the existing backup set.  If you want to change the password of existing actual backups themselves, Macrium does not provide a way to do that even if you know the current password.

Going forward, you might want to consider a password manager like LastPass.  I use it primarily to manage my website passwords since it operates as a browser plugin, but it can also store "Secure Notes", which can be arbitrary text and are therefore useful for storing non-website passwords or any other sensitive information.  LastPass implemented their security properly such that even they can't access your vault data, which means they can't directly reset your password.  Instead, your recovery options are rather limited (documented here).  But of course you only have to remember one password with them in the first place if you have everything in there, so hopefully forgetting isn't as much of a risk.  Just make sure it's a long, unique password since it will protect everything else.  And the paid version has a feature called Emergency Access which I think is an elegant solution to the, "I want to keep my data private, but what if I get hit by a bus and now my family needs access to it unexpectedly?" problem.

Edited 18 October 2019 5:49 PM by jphughan
Roland Stoller
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Has anyone used emergency access?  How does it work?

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  Ben Franklin revisited.

jphughan
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Roland Stoller - 4 November 2019 7:01 PM
Has anyone used emergency access?  How does it work?

@RolandJS I've used it in a testing capacity since neither I nor my family members have had a real-life emergency to justify using it on our real accounts, but it works like this.

1. You pre-authorize certain other people (who must be LastPass users) to REQUEST Emergency Access.  This does NOT immediately grant them emergency access; it just gives them the ability to request it at some point in the future.  For each person you specify, you can also optionally specify a waiting period.  More on this below.

2. The people you designate must accept that pre-authorization.

3. If someone you have authorized for Emergency Access ever requests it, then you get an email telling you that.  If you don't act on that email to DENY the request within the waiting period that you specified, then that person is granted access to your vault.

You can revoke pre-authorizations in the future, but if someone has requested and been granted actual emergency access to your vault, I believe that's permanent.

LastPass has a full article about this feature here, and you might also be interested in the "How is Emergency Access secure?" link at the bottom under the "Related" heading, which delves into the cryptographic design aspect.  Also note that with the exception of LastPass Free users who set this up before Emergency Access became limited to paid accounts, the person GRANTING Emergency Access to their vault must be a paid LastPass user.  But I believe that the people being pre-authorized can be Free users -- although I'm not certain about that.

Edited 4 November 2019 7:41 PM by jphughan
Roland Stoller
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Thanks for such a thorough explanation  Smile

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  Ben Franklin revisited.

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