scheduled backup vs windows update


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Frank Esposito
Frank Esposito
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Hello  --  have my schedule backups  running each day at 8am -- my computer is usually off at that time, so  when I  turn it on, the backup starts ( I have the option set to run the back asap if it can't at the scheduled time ) 

yesterday when I turned on the computer, the backup started shortly there after --  it seems to be taking for ever -- the  data transfer rate was 10mb/s when it usually over 200 --  When it  finally finished, it took over 2 hours  -- this was an incremental  backup  which usually take 15 minutes 

I  then discovered that  in win10 quest to keep  at the cutting edge of updates, it  was  process the cumulative update 2019-09 which explained why the bit scan during the backup was taking so long 

question -- other than seeing what is going on is there some way reflect can detect this?  and since the  image was created  while the update was in process  could  this backup be tainted in any  way?  Would it have made sense cancel the backup at that point run it later?  Thanks 
dbminter
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Just my own preference, I would have cancelled the backup and let the update finish completely, including restart, then manually running the backup again.


I can't say for sure how a restored backup taken during the start of a Windows Update would affect the system.  I wouldn't trust such a backup, as I said above.


You might want to change Active Hours/your backup schedule so backups run during Active Hours.  That way, Windows Updates won't start on their own when a backup is running.

Frank Esposito
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dbminter - 4 October 2019 4:25 PM
Just my own preference, I would have cancelled the backup and let the update finish completely, including restart, then manually running the backup again.


I can't say for sure how a restored backup taken during the start of a Windows Update would affect the system.  I wouldn't trust such a backup, as I said above.


You might want to change Active Hours/your backup schedule so backups run during Active Hours.  That way, Windows Updates won't start on their own when a backup is running.

thanks for the info ---
jphughan
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Another issue that came up a while ago is that if you try to start a backup after an upgrade to a new version of Windows 10 has been "staged", but before the PC has been restarted, Reflect won't be able to make a backup.  My guess there was that Windows wouldn't allow a VSS snapshot to be performed in that situation.  It was unfortunate because the user specifically wanted to make a backup before restarting to allow the upgrade to proceed, but apparently that isn't an option.  I'm not sure if the same applies to regular monthly updates, but if Windows allowed a VSS snapshot to be captured, I personally wouldn't worry about the integrity of the backup.  Absolute worst case if that backup turns out not to be usable for system restore, you could restore the previous day's backup and then grab any required user data out of the latest backup.  I realize that would be rather inconvenient, but again I doubt it would be necessary even if you needed to restore that backup -- although this incidentally is yet another reason it's nice to have a different partition for your user data separate from the OS, so that you can roll back your OS without also rolling back your personal data.

I'm surprised that the performance impact was that drastic, though.  But in any case, as dbminter says, scheduling your backups to occur during your active hours wouldn't be a bad idea, especially if they tend to take only 15 minutes.  Or one way to split the difference would be to start your active hours earlier than you actually start using your PC and/or later than you stop using it, then schedule your backups to occur at either the beginning or end of that window.  At that point, your backups should occur either just before or shortly after updates have installed outside of your active hours.  Your active hours range can be at most 18 hours long, fyi.

Edited 4 October 2019 8:55 PM by jphughan
Frank Esposito
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jphughan - 4 October 2019 8:54 PM
Another issue that came up a while ago is that if you try to start a backup after an upgrade to a new version of Windows 10 has been "staged", but before the PC has been restarted, Reflect won't be able to make a backup.  My guess there was that Windows wouldn't allow a VSS snapshot to be performed in that situation.  It was unfortunate because the user specifically wanted to make a backup before restarting to allow the upgrade to proceed, but apparently that isn't an option.  I'm not sure if the same applies to regular monthly updates, but if Windows allowed a VSS snapshot to be captured, I personally wouldn't worry about the integrity of the backup.  Absolute worst case if that backup turns out not to be usable for system restore, you could restore the previous day's backup and then grab any required user data out of the latest backup.  I realize that would be rather inconvenient, but again I doubt it would be necessary even if you needed to restore that backup -- although this incidentally is yet another reason it's nice to have a different partition for your user data separate from the OS, so that you can roll back your OS without also rolling back your personal data.

I'm surprised that the performance impact was that drastic, though.  But in any case, as dbminter says, scheduling your backups to occur during your active hours wouldn't be a bad idea, especially if they tend to take only 15 minutes.  Or one way to split the difference would be to start your active hours earlier than you actually start using your PC and/or later than you stop using it, then schedule your backups to occur at either the beginning or end of that window.  At that point, your backups should occur either just before or shortly after updates have installed outside of your active hours.  Your active hours range can be at most 18 hours long, fyi.

thanks again for the info -- its an old pc --- really old   --- it started out as xp pro - vista  - win 7 and now  win 10 ---  it really does not have  much more life left --- for the 
most part I use it now for  music   ripping flac files and converting them to mp3 and save it  to my ipod ---

the next project os to  convert it to a vm  -- its  32bit os   and I have a custom build dlls I wrote over 25 years ago  -- I  dont have the  drive to  rework them for 64bit --- now 
thanks again --
jphughan
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Well if you've got a newer PC that's running a Pro version of Windows, you could use Macrium viBoot, which allows you to boot a Reflect image backup of a PC as a VM on another PC.

Edited 4 October 2019 9:17 PM by jphughan
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