Disk clone activating hard disk or other


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mfx
mfx
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Hi

I'm currently attempting to restore and clone my image to a new. Ssd 970 Pro m. 2 1tb from a sata 850pro 500gb.
I've attempted to clone the current install and also reinstall image from early Jan same setup and config.
I'm having an issue where it simply won't boot.
I've removed the old master drive.
Set bios to boot from the 970 only.
When attempting to boot I get a light blue windows error message stating issue with hard ware.
I attempted to fix boot in macrium. Whilst it see the windows 10 installation and I know the data is on the drive due to size and amount used it is unable to see the drive.
I believe because it is not active or I have missed a step in the process. 
I had previously formatted the drive and MBr set using usease partition magic.
Still no luck.
I have just tried repairing using the latest Windows 10 installer. No luck. Get message Startup repair couldn't repair your pc.

The hard drive shows up on the old install and of course in bios.
Just unable to boot into windows on it.
Really trying to avoid a full fresh reinstall as used for music production and takes over a week to install and tweak.
The clue to me is on fixing boot the windows install shows with the 970 but the disk does not for active partition. 
How to activate the parti on and fix please.

I really expected macrium to simply clone. Fix and work.
Any help appreciated.
Thank you



Edited 2 March 2019 9:34 AM by mfx
jphughan
jphughan
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Rerun the clone as normal and then run ReDeploy afterward, before your first boot. You’re migrating from a SATA to NVMe SSD, which means Windows needs to be modified to load an NVMe driver during boot in order to see the device it’s trying to boot from. Right now it’s only loading a SATA driver, which is why you’re seeing the boot error. ReDeploy is specifically designed to facilitate migrations to different hardware, including this scenario.

If it still doesn’t boot after that, run Fix Boot Problems as well.
Edited 2 March 2019 3:07 PM by jphughan
mfx
mfx
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Thank you for the detailed reply. 
I went through the re dploy route and selecting both the drivers. I think I was performing the fix boot problems at same time and it wasn't working.
However following your advice and also removing the original Sara drive appeared to solve it.
So tha k you up and running.
The only minor issue I have now is post bios boot pre windows boot. I get a blue boot screen option for Windows 10 which works fine and a macrium reflect boot option.
Any help to boot straight to Windows welcome.
Tha k you.

jphughan
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Excellent! For the boot menu, do you want to remove that Reflect Rescue boot menu recovery option entirely, or just remove the option to select it at initial startup, meaning you’d have to access it through other less convenient means if you ever wanted to use it? You could also split the difference by shortening the boot menu timeout to something like 3 seconds, which is long enough to select the Rescue option when you want it but typically short enough not to bother people during normal booting. Whichever you want, here’s how to do it?

- To remove the boot menu recovery function entirely, go to Rescue Media Builder in Reflect, select Windows Boot Menu, select Remove, and click Build.

- To keep that function registered as a boot option but remove the startup menu, open “msconfig”, go to the Boot tab, and set the timeout value to 0. Or change it to whatever else you want, like 3.
mfx
mfx
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Thank you I'm going for the last option as an easy to remember tweak.
Really appreciate your help. I'm going to put back the old driver once reformatted so no mbr or os on it.

Something else I would like to do and may need to start a different thread. Is install Windows 7 as a second boot option. Main reason is purely for something to do in playing older games that no longer appear to run on win10. I may even dig out an old xp loc but not sure of I'll get everything working hence qin7.
So cut short nest way to have a dil boot system I think is what I need?
Edited 3 March 2019 5:03 PM by mfx
jphughan
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I really wouldn't recommend trying to do that, for a few reasons.  First, in general when you want to dual boot a system, you install the oldest OS first and let the newer OS handle setting up the dual boot configuration.  I don't know if Windows 7 will set up a dual boot configuration properly when Windows 10 is already there.  It also sounds like you intend to have Windows 7 on a physically separate disk.  You might have to do that anyway given that Windows 7 has no native support for NVMe unless you manually apply certain hotfixes that Microsoft says only received limited testing, but that might complicate system recovery situations, especially if you ever need to run Fix Boot Problems, since I'm not sure whether it would set that up properly.  I remember someone on here posted a thread where he had spent a great deal of time trying to dual boot Windows and (I think) Ubuntu on separate disks and figured that if he captured an image of both disks, he would always be able to restore either one or even both at the same time and still have his dual boot setup intact.  It didn't work out that way on his test restore, and he didn't stick around trying to troubleshoot it.  On top of everything else, Windows 7 doesn't support UEFI Secure Boot, which is a nice anti-rootkit measure, so unless you'd be ok toggling that on and off in your BIOS interface every time you want to switch OSes, you'd have to just leave it off, sacrificing some protection that would otherwise be available for your Win10 environment.  (That said, if your Win10 disk is currently set up as MBR, it's not using UEFI booting right now and therefore wouldn't be able to use Secure Boot.  You might want to look into Microsoft's MBR2GPT utility to perform an in-place conversion to a UEFI setup that would allow you to enable Secure Boot.  UEFI has other advantages as well.  Obviously capture a Reflect backup before you do that just to be safe.)

Then there's the fact that there are multiple ways to achieve dual boot with multiple Windows OSes when they're on separate disks.  The first and default setup is to have the system itself always boot from one particular disk that contains Windows Boot Manager, and then the BCD in that instance of Boot Manager has options for both Windows OSes that would be presented in the blue boot menu you're already seeing.  That's generally more convenient, but it means that the OTHER disk might not necessarily be bootable independently if that ever became necessary.  The second way would be to set up the disks completely independently of each other, each with its own Windows Boot Manager instance that only knows about the Windows installation on its own disk, and then you access your SYSTEM'S one-time boot menu any time you want to boot from your less frequently used disk containing your less frequently used Windows installation.  But I've personally never tried to set something like this up, and Windows Setup wouldn't on its own either.  If you want to attempt this, I would recommend physically disconnecting the SSD containing your Win10 installation when you install Windows 7 to the other disk.  But once again, if you ever ran into boot issues, this non-default setup might be more difficult to troubleshoot.

And lastly, if your PC is relatively new, you might not even be able to get Windows 7 drivers for all of its hardware.  You'd also technically need a separate Windows 7 license, and I don't know of any reputable sources still selling any.  And even after all of that, Windows 7 will stop receiving security updates in January, which is a risk unless you'd actually keep that OS completely offline.

If you have games that don't run on Windows 10 but do run on Windows 7 (which actually does surprise me), I would start by seeing if there are workarounds.  Sometimes it's literally as simple as enabling Compatibility Mode for that application.  If that doesn't work, if they're old enough you might find that they run acceptably in a VM.  If you have Win10 Pro, you could use Hyper-V for this, otherwise there's Virtualbox -- although you'd still need a license for the OS within the VM.  Otherwise, if this is just for games, I'd suggest buying a cheap used system that already has an OEM Windows 7 license and using that.

mfx
mfx
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Thank you so much for the response and explanation.
I fud figure that it might be an issue. I've b older i7 egicg I simply need to sutce a x58 mono board for and gave pkenty if valid window licenses so will go for a second build at done point.
I was really toying with the idea so that's put to bed.
I've tried workarounds with the games mainly EA Battlefield series and older Cod series nit working on the new build.
I do have pro installed do may tip my toe into the virtual u suggested when I get time.


For now I'm happy I've got the new drive loaded.
Just need to workout how to increase the bios boot time. Think it's doing a full memory test but not a problem again I'm happy.
Thank you for your time and help. 

M

GO

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