How to make a bootable clone without copying the whole disk?


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ptoye
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My hard drive has two partitions in use C: and D: as well as the MBR and system boot partition. I want to make a clone of the disk which is bootable and has just the C: partition. I can't see anything in the help files which tell me how to do this, except by copying the D: partition data to backup, getting rid of D: and the other partitions, cloning the whole disk and e-establishing the D: partition.

Or is there an easier way?

et_and_family
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You can clone your hard drive by following tutorial https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW7/Cloning+a+disk at step 4. drag the system partitions, including C: drive, from the Source to the Destination one at a time. Immediately after dragging the C: drive you can resize it if you wish by clicking on the 'Cloned partition properties' Do not drag D: drive if you do not want it on the destination harddrive.

If your destination hard drive already has partitions you do not want then before you do step 4. above select  each partition you do not want in the destination hard drive and click on 'Delete existing partition'.

There is more on resizing partitions in tutorial https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW7/Modifying+restored+paritition+properties at step 6.

Hope this helps

Edited 29 March 2018 7:56 PM by et_and_family
jphughan
jphughan
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In the upper-left corner of Reflect, click the “Image the partitions required to boot Windows” button. That will include all and only the partitions that fit that description, which will be more than just C.

EDIT: Sorry, missed that you were trying to clone. In that case click that button to see which partitions are necessary, then cancel that wizard and follow the steps above to set up a clone job where only those partitions are selected as the source.
Edited 29 March 2018 8:56 PM by jphughan
ptoye
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Thanks to both of you for the help. I still don't know whether this will put the MBR onto the new disk, or how to get it there if it doesn't.

jphughan
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I believe the MBR is copied, but even if it's not, then you could run the Fix Boot Problems mechanism from the Rescue Media in order to make your cloned instance bootable, unless you have a custom bootloader of some kind?

But @Nick this reminded me of two questions I meant to ask anyway: a) Is the MBR always copied on any clone operation regardless of which partition(s) are selected on the source, and b) Given that the image restore wizard offers a choice whether or not to restore the MBR, could a similar option be added to the clone wizard?  This might be handy if users are cloning partitions from multiple source disks onto the same destination disk, for example.  I helped another user here set up a series of jobs that cloned his OS disk and two other physical disks all onto a large (but much slower) emergency fallback disk.  In that scenario, ideally only the clone job for the OS disk's partitions would copy the MBR to the clone target.

Edited 30 March 2018 1:21 PM by jphughan
ptoye
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jphughan - 30 March 2018 1:19 PM
I believe the MBR is copied, but even if it's not, then you could run the Fix Boot Problems mechanism from the Rescue Media in order to make your cloned instance bootable, unless you have a custom bootloader of some kind?

But @Nick this reminded me of two questions I meant to ask anyway: a) Is the MBR always copied on any clone operation regardless of which partition(s) are selected on the source, and b) Given that the image restore wizard offers a choice whether or not to restore the MBR, could a similar option be added to the clone wizard?  This might be handy if users are cloning partitions from multiple source disks onto the same destination disk, for example.  I helped another user here set up a series of jobs that cloned his OS disk and two other physical disks all onto a large (but much slower) emergency fallback disk.  In that scenario, ideally only the clone job for the OS disk's partitions would copy the MBR to the clone target.

Thanks again. I cloned the relevant partitions and the MBR was copied too it seems - it booted OK.
 It really should be in the documentation. I assume it comes with the system reserved partition.



jphughan
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ptoye - 30 March 2018 3:58 PM

Thanks again. I cloned the relevant partitions and the MBR was copied too it seems - it booted OK.
 It really should be in the documentation. I assume it comes with the system reserved partition.



The MBR isn't in the System Reserved Partition, although if you have a System Reserved Partition, that suggests that your disk uses the GPT partition layout, not MBR, in which case you wouldn't have an MBR anyway because GPT disks don't use them, except to have a "Protective MBR" to keep them protected from applications that don't know how to work with GPT disks.  If your disk is set up for GPT, then it would use UEFI boot, and UEFI boot works completely differently.  Instead of looking scanning the MBR for active partitions and then checking a defined area of those partitions for executable code, UEFI systems scan the FAT and FAT32 partitions on the disk for a bootloader file at a defined location, which is \EFI\Boot\Bootx64.efi.  That file is located on your EFI/ESP partition rather than your Windows partition because NTFS support is only optional in the UEFI spec, not mandatory, and if the UEFI firmware can't read an NTFS file system, then it can't look for a bootloader file on that partition, which means the bootloader file has to be stored elsewhere.  It's also possible to register custom bootloader files at custom paths in the system's UEFI firmware, which Windows does for its Bootmgfw.efi file (also on the EFI/ESP partition) as part of the Windows Setup process.

Edited 20 July 2020 2:53 AM by jphughan
ptoye
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Thanks again. I'm not a Windows boot expert. It seems to be booting OK, and I assume that it's using the new disk rather than the old one. It's certainly a lot faster, It's quite an old machine - 2010 vintage running Windows 7.


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