Multiple Ways to Convert a Physical Machine to a Virtual Machine


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BigMac1
BigMac1
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There are at least 3 ways I can see to convert a physical machine to a virtual machine using Macrium Reflect, and a fourth way that doesn't use Reflect. I'm having a difficult time distinguishing among them. Please help me out.

1- In Reflect I can go to Other Tasks > Convert Image to VHD, which uses the ImgToVHD utility.
2- I can use Macrium ViBoot.
3- I can follow the knowledgebase article "Converting a Physical Machine to a Virtual Machine"

How do these methods differ from each other?

And why use Reflect at all if I can:

4- Go to Windows Disk Management > Actions > Create VHD

Surely I'm missing something (perhaps a good night's sleep.) What is the difference among these four methods?
Nick
Nick
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 1- In Reflect I can go to Other Tasks > Convert Image to VHD, which uses the ImgToVHD utility.

Creates a VHD from an Image. A VHD is not an VHDX and is limited to 2TB in size. You also need to create a VM, attach the VHD and run ReDeploy from the Windows PE media if necessary. 

 2- I can use Macrium ViBoot.

viBoot is 'Instant Virtualisation' and will automatically create a VM and boot an image file in seconds. It does not make any changes to the image file and does not create a VHD/X. ReDeploy is automatically run on the VM to ensure incompatible hardware from the source will boot in the VM. This is very quick and very simple but not permanent and can be used to confirm that your images are bootable. 

 I can follow the knowledgebase article "Converting a Physical Machine to a Virtual Machine"

Following these steps restores an image to a VM containing an existing VHD/X. You may still need to run ReDeploy from the rescue media. This is slightly more involved than (1) but more flexible in that you can restore disks > 2TB in size.  

4- Go to Windows Disk Management > Actions > Create VHD

Creates an empty VHD/X.  After this operation you need to create a VM and restore an image using Rescue media to get a bootable VM.



Kind Regards

Nick - Macrium Support

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Edited 13 December 2016 9:08 PM by Nick
BigMac1
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Thanks! Now I understand.

For my purpose ViBoot sounds right. I'm going to do a clean install of Windows 10 and I'd like my user accounts to be setup more or less as they are presently in Windows 8.1, to the extent that still makes sense in Windows 10. With ViBoot I can have Windows 8.1 running in a VM for reference without needing to create a VHDX.
GO

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